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2

Strange as it may seem, you want to start a Kingside attack. This puts black in a quandary. He can stop the attack by exchanging pieces, but then he will be without counterplay in the ending. A lot of technique in a winning positions has to do with the "principle of two weaknesses". If you Google this phrase you will find a lot of very useful stuff. This is ...


0

As others mentioned, a4?? gives away white's advantage. You will likely have to return the piece to stop the passed pawns after this move. I'm going to suggest a different alternative approach than others have suggested. I think 1. Rxd4 Rb7 2. Rxc4 dxc4 is fine. The key move now is 3. Rc2. Black cannot play 3. ... b4 because of 4. Rxc4. If they attempt to ...


19

One basic endgame rule of thumb that could help here, is that 2 connected passed pawns on the 6th rank are worth about as much as a rook, and 2 connected passed pawns on the 7th rank beat a rook. By playing 3. a4, you allowed the black b pawn to pass, and connect with the already passed black c pawn. This is disastrous - you've basically given your opponent ...


28

You unblocking your opponent's passed d-pawn with 2. Rxc4 is what went wrong from a pragmatic perspective. You are up a piece. The only way black wins this position is by promoting pawns so that you're not up a piece anymore (e.g. pushing that 2-to-1 queenside pawn majority). This can be easily stopped with the following approach: Keep your rook where ...


9

In the final position, the black pieces are pointed toward the king side, so logic says that you should attack there. The two obstacles are the bishop pinning the f-pawn and the control provided by the doubled e-pawns. Stockfish pushes the a-pawn to chase away the bishop and uses the queen to apply pressure on e3. Pressuring and exploiting white's dark-...


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