59

In this game Kasparov is showing a perfect demonstration of the triangulation technique in order to Zugzwang the white king. To be in a Zugzwang means, any move loses or more generally, worsens your position, and one cannot simply pass the turn and maintain the position. In the diagrammed position, the key idea to spot is that white would be in Zugzwang ...


17

Short answer: Since after the bishop recapture on f8 (and not the rook recapture!) white is tactically and positionally completely busted, with 5 active black pieces against a completely exposed king in the centre and no foreseeable chance of consolidation in order to eventually benefit from the material advantage. First observations: 15...Bxf8 is with ...


17

This was a great game! Hou Yifan brilliantly outplayed her opponent Fabiano Caruana in a very positional middle game, and mind you using the Petroff's defence in the opening, which is Caruana's specialty by any stretch of the word! The endgame was very tricky, and Caruana proved his resilience and held the game to a draw in a very resourceful way, despite ...


13

I see no reason to ?! mark. 8. g3 is good book move and standard way to limit opponent's play with open h-file. The most flexible move by far is 8...Nbd7 after it. After 9.Bg2 dxc4 should be good. But again, 4...Bf5 is no refutation of slow slav and 5...Bg6 is in my opinion less challenging than 5...Be4, while there's nothing wrong with 8.g3. Don't expect ...


13

When you move one rook to the center, the other rook, obviously, cannot cross it. If you play Rfd1, you cannot then play Rae1. And if you play Rad1, you cannot then play Rfc1. So, part of this decision is planning ahead and thinking about which other file you are likely to want a rook on. Relatedly, if you play a move like Rae1, you are trapping your f-rook,...


10

You left out THE single biggest factor in the position, at least initially: The knight has zero mobility. That said, she did, indeed miss two opportunities to win involving a queening scenario, but they were very tricky for a human. I remember this endgame when they played it, and now, the winning idea comes back to me. [Event "Grenke Chess Classic 5th"] ...


9

The only opening move I really didn't like is 6…Nc6. Usually you don't want to put something in front of your c-pawn in these d-pawn openings. And incidentally it also seems to lose a piece (because of 8.cxd5 with Bb5 to follow). It also leads to all your positional problems: The pressure on d5, the slightly weakening move f6, the inability to free yourself ...


8

If you really must, because your friend bet a wager that he can beat you as black in this position, here are the imbalances, concrete and possible, that you must look out for (as white): [FEN ""] 1.e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd8 Black's open d-file Active LSB Kingside pawn majority Still, this is not without its weaknesses: A delay in development. White ...


8

Before we talk planning, you can see from the diagram arrows that the tactical line 12.Nxd3 followed by c4 is available. A trade of c&b pawns for Whites e&d pawns = the center is Blacks; not to mention the monster on b7 is unopposed. On to abstract thinking: "I considered moving a knight to g4 with the idea of exchanging with the dark-...


8

This is a stunning endgame. It is impressive how Kasparov perfectly used reserve tempi to reach the winning position in the diagram where triangulation is all that remains after Seirawan's 40. e4?? which was the last move of time-control. After this Seirawan is lost. Seirawan annotates this game in his book full of stories "Chess Duels : My Games with the ...


6

After 17 Bxc5 Bxc5 18 ed Qxd5 no pawn is lost due to the mate threat at g2. Black has two active bishops and threatens Rad8 with pressure on the d pawn. If white does not exchange pawns then black can play Qd7 and Rad8.


6

After 1. Rac1, Black has the intermediate move 1...Nxc3, attacking the rook on d1, which forces White to play 2. bxc3, and then the pawn on a3 is hanging. So Black would likely go 2...Nxe3 followed by 3...Bxa3. [FEN "r3kb1r/pp1q1pp1/2p1p3/3nPb2/3P1N1p/PBN1BQ1P/1Pn2PP1/R2R2K1 w - - 1 1"] 1. Rac1 Nxc3 2. bxc3 Nxe3 3. null Bxa3


6

When there is no concrete plan of action possible, the general plan should be to - Improve the position of your pieces Trade off bad pieces if possible Try to create weaknesses in your opponent's position Keep your king safe and see if the enemy's king position can be compromised.


5

You can only adjust your plan to your opponent when you have multiple moves that are equally or almost equally good objectively, since sometimes one of these moves might seem better than the others against a particular opponent. But making an objectively poor move in the hopes that your opponent will not find the refutation is asking for punishment. By far ...


5

Taking into account your earlier version of this question (with number of moves to think ahead, etc), I think you might be a bit confused about the terms. Basically chess is played using two methods: tactics/calculation positional play/strategy Tactics/calculation ... is when you actually calculate concrete variations, i.e. something like: if I make this ...


5

Instead of 15... Rxf8 like in your line, black could play 15... Bxf8. Bxf8 attacks the queen, so the queen has to move. 16. Qa4 let c3 uncovered and makes 16... Nxc3 with an upcoming Re8+ possible, 16. Qc1 (the only other square for the queen) should pretty much be lost after 16... Nxc3 (the queen can't take because of Bb4). On 17. Rd2 Re8+ looks strong, and ...


4

"The Art of The Middle Game" by Keres and Kotov comes to mind. And an older book,"Strategy and Tactics in Chess" by Max Euwe, was long considered a classic in this area. Of course study always has to be combined with practice.


4

It's hard to ask for plan when opponent is on the move. This is my understanding without help of engine. White is now exchange up but 2 pawns down. However, Black's 3 isolated pawns look worrying. White needs to keep his knight in contact with e2 to stop the pawn advancing. My plan for white would be to put knight on e2, activate both rooks to attack the ...


4

A plan without (extensive) analysis can only be given in very stable structures. Here, the position is pretty tactical and volatile. White might be able to round up the e3-pawn with Nd1 and h3. Then black has to calculate hard to not wind up in a very bad endgame. So here my "plan" during a game would look like this: Use any tactical trick you can find to ...


4

Try taking a look at books that discuss the structures arising out of various openings. Andrew Soltis' Pawn Structure Chess and Mauricio Flores Rios' Chess Structures both provide good overviews of the appropriate pawn breaks, piece placements, and defensive resources. Of the two, I'd say Rios' book is the more rigorous and comprehensive. It's certainly ...


4

This position is still very far from having a definitive character that would dictate the nature of best play. That is still perhaps twenty moves away. If you are already thinking that you have an advantage and just need to find a way in, you will not be playing objectively. Your position is fine, you will be able to develop easily, you have two Bishops, but ...


4

I would say that the only obvious target for black (meaning a plan that's almost build into the opening) is applying pressure to the white d pawn, assuming white does play d4. Then of course he should try to break with either c5 or e5. I can recommend checking out IM John Bartholomew, he's got a Youtube channel and he's a huge fan of the Scandi Qd8 line, I ...


4

This is an open-end question. My recommendation is join serious face-to-face tournaments where you play games at the classical time control. Playing blitz is fun, but not a good idea for learning chess.


4

In order to develop a study plan you'd basically have to figure out your strengths/weaknesses and formulate a goal that you want to achieve. In practice this means that a stronger player would have to analyze your games, but also (particularly at higher level) look at other things such as psychological factors, fitness, etc. Ideally that coach would spend ...


4

Best is 2.Qh8+ Ke7, after which White has a choice: Go for 3.Qh7+ Kf6 4.Qxb7 Kxg5, when White has won a queen for a knight with a completely winning position. Go for 3.Re1+, which is slightly more complicated but leads to a forced mate according to Stockfish: [FEN "4r2Q/pq2k3/1p4p1/2p2nNp/2Pp4/3P4/PP3PPP/R5K1 w - - 0 3"] 3.Re1+ Ne3 4.Qg7+ Kd6 5.Qxb7 Re7 ...


3

Let's check forcing moves first. 1... Qxf2 is definitely draw. [FEN "8/8/8/2p1p3/2Pp2P1/1knP4/3q1QK2/5B2 b - - 0 1"] 1... Qxf2 2. Kxf2 e4 (2...Kc2 { transposes to main line}) {Nd1, or Na4 too slow, so e4 is the only option. Kc2 transposes to this line.} 3. Kg3! (3. g5? Kc2 {Both sides queen, but black remains with extra pawns, winning for black}) (3. dxe4?...


3

Your game plan and actual moves don't really align. You place a bishop on b7 but never make any effort to activate that bishop by opening the a8-h1 diagonal. You also spend a significant amount of time without developing your black square bishop and thus not castling. This means you are exposing yourself to threats to your king which is how you got into ...


3

Since your opponent is most likely to castle short, you have to choose lines where long castling (for you) is reasonable. With white I would suggest 1. e4, and against 1... e5 the Center Game 1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. Qxd4 Nc6 4. Qe3. [Title "Center Game"] [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. Qxd4 Nc6 4. Qe3 Against 1... c5 you can play the Open Sicilian (2. Nf3 ...


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