8

No, you cannot force white to play c4 and end up in a KID. However, if you want to avoid the Pirc, you have several options after 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3. ... d5 is the most popular and you usually end up in easy to play positions. E.g. you can fianchetto your bishop to g7, attack the center with c5, etc.. You need to be prepared for the Hübsch/Blackmar-Diemer ...


7

1. e4 g6 could certainly transpose into a Pirc but it is not the first two standard moves. If you look at the ECO entry for B07, B08, B09 you will see the standard variations for the Pirc/Modern. I would say the link you give is wrong. ECO B07 1. e4 d6 without 2. d4 2. d4 without 2... Nf6 2... Nf6 without 3. Nc3 3. Nc3 without 3... g6 3... g6 without ...


5

Playing ...d5 isn't your typical Pirc idea, although it can be played under the right circumstances. In the diagram, White's d3-bishop and f3-knight are vulnerable to a potential ...e4 push. In addition, your g4-bishop provides some tactical possibilities by pinning the knight. Concretely speaking, everything just works nicely for an immediate challenge in ...


5

In most early-stage Pircs, black is slightly worse, so of course, the computer will prefer any move that equalizes, or in this case, gives you a slight advantage. White is not well-placed in the center due to the pin on the Nf3, and the Bd3 interferes with the Qd1's protection of the center (d4) too. Black can effectively "blow-up" the center here, which ...


4

It comes down to the VERY poor placement of the white pieces, in particular, that the Bd3 is vulnerable to being trapped by the advancing black queenside pawns. Taking with the knight also allows you to open the center with d5 in some lines (which also will make the Qd1 uncomfortable since it lacks space), taking advantage of your better-placed pieces, and ...


4

Yeah, seems like black just blundered a pawn with c5. Probably you just mixed up the variation and you really wanted to play: rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. f4 Bg7 5. Nf3 c5 That is quite a common variation, I looked at 6.dc Qa5 7.Qd4 for white a while back, if I remember correctly. So maybe you ...


4

Its likely a transposition to the Pribyl defense. 1. e4 d6 2. d4 nf6 3. nc3 c6 where black plays e5 at some point. Its covered in a few books about 1 .. d6 lines where black does not play g6. Also it can transpose to the Old-Indian defense when white plays c4.


3

...c5 followed by ...Qa5 is indeed a very important trick in the Pirc defense in order to reach a dragonlike pawn structure. However, it can only work after you have developed your bishop to g7, adding pressure on the dark squares. Compare rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 c5 6. dxc5 ...


3

after 1.d4,Nf6 2.Nc3 one can use 2...d5. Since White cannot easily play c4, he cannot apply pressure on the d pawn (as in queen's gambit for example). As a result, Black has a very easy opening.


2

There is a line of the Pirc, the Ufimtsev-Pytel Variation, that includes these moves after 1.e4 and 2.d4: [FEN ""] [White "Pirc Defense"] [Black "Ufimtsev-Pytel Variation"] 1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 (2... c6 3.Nc3 (3.c4! {taking advantage of Black's move order to install another center pawn} Nf6 4.Nc3 {may transpose to a Classical KID after ...g6 and ...Bg7, with ...


2

The Pirc and the Modern Defense are very closely related. In the Pirc, black fianchettoes his king's bishop and plays ...Nf6; ...d6 is necessary to prepare ...Nf6, because otherwise white can chase the knight away with e4-e5. There are several setups white can choose, but black's defines the Pirc defence: [fen "rnbqk2r/ppp1ppbp/3p1np1/8/3PP3/2N2N2/PPP2PPP/...


2

Engines don't like philosophy behind KID and if they are forced to play KID, they play c6 there all day long too. Here it's quite similar. You can play for both plans but I see nothing wrong with the f5 ideas. It seems to be much better version of main line KID.


2

Planning to play the Old Indian (Be7 for black) against the London System has no bite since white can control e5 more easily. The Be7 does not aim at e5, of course, but as important, it inhibits Re8, and its control of e5 also. So minus two pieces helping play e5, and you are not likely to get that freeing move in. You would also have to play (after d6) e6 ...


1

I wouldn't recommend London against 1...d6 or 1...g6. They can do 1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 g6 3.Bf4 Bg7 4.e3 Nd7 5.h3 (or whatever) e5 which is if anything more comfortable for black imho. Black normally has to do some contortions such as Nfd7 to get e5 in whereas now he gets it in one go. Play 2.e4 and learn some small amount of theory in one of the main lines (...


1

If you like playing the London system, then it is playable: 1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 Nd7 3.Bf4. Now if Black plays 3...g6 then you just go for 4.e3, 5.h3, 6.Be2, etc. And as Brian noted, 3...e5 is poor. However, if you don't like the London then you need another line. If you want to remain completely in d4 waters then you could go for: 1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 Nd7 3.c4 e5 4....


1

When this happens, can I play the London System, possibly with d4-Bf4, and so forth? Simple answer is "Yes, provided you play 3. Nf3" [fen ""] 1. d4 d6 2. Bf4 Nd7 3. Nf3 e5 4. dxe5 dxe5 5. Nxe5 Just leaves black a pawn down for no compensation. So, black can't play 3 ... e5


1

If you are aiming to use this tree for practical use at 2000 level, you should start in the Pirc tabiya position after 1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6. That's where it all starts, with main choices being 4.f4, 4.Be2, 4.Be3, 4.Nf3, 4.f3. (edit: Also 4.Bg5, 4.Bc4 and even 4.Bf4 as pointed in comments. And also 4.g3 and 4.h3) That way, you will not be confused by ...


1

I play like this with the white pieces [FEN ""] 1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4.h3 Bg7 5.Nf3 O-O 6.Bd3 As far as I understand, black already has a "dragon structure" because the dragon pawn chain is h7-g6-f7-e7-d6 and has nothing to do with the c-pawn. It is true that the Dragon variation is found in the Sicilian system. But the dragon pawn structure has ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible