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48

I am not an expert on stockfish source code, but my understanding is the following. Humans: It is true, that the 1 piece equals 3 pawns approach is pretty accurate, surprisingly so. However as you are probably aware, when evaluating a position, we consider many other aspects as well, such as piece activity, space, king safety, etc. The difference however ...


38

The answer by MikroDel gives the commonly-used "Reinfeld values" of pawn=1, bishop=knight=3, rook=5, and queen=9 (kings are essentially worth an infinite number of points, because the game ends if it is lost). While this is a good guide, chess is rarely that simple. Many books will give the value of bishops as 3.5 instead of 3, simply because they ...


30

blundering a full piece or being a full piece down are typical expressions in English chess literature. With the little word "full", the author wants to make clear that the player has not only lost the piece, but that they also received no consolation material in return, i.e. one or two pawns. An alternative expression is "blundering a ...


30

I am not an arbiter, but here's what the rules say: Rule 4.3 (emphasis added) if the player having the move touches on the chessboard, with the intention of moving or capturing I think it should be clear to any reasonable person that picking up a piece that was knocked down by a spectator does not imply intent to move. Perhaps the arbiter went with an ...


22

PyChess has about 20 fonts and SVGs bundled in its source code:


22

Individual pieces: Pawn - 1 point Knight - 3 points Bishop - 3 points Rook - 5 points Queen - 9 points Piece combinations: Rook and Knight - 7.5 points Rook and Bishop - 8 points Pair of Rooks - 10 points Three minor pieces - 10 points Rook and two minor pieces - 11 points N.B. The values may vary because of circumstances, but these are the basic values.


20

Each player has a white square on their near right corner. The queen goes on the square of her own color; as a result, the kings and queens face each other. rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1


20

The numbers refer to rules in the FIDE laws of chess. 6.2. A player must press his clock with the same hand with which he made his move. It is forbidden for a player to keep his finger on the clock or to ‘hover’ over it. The rule that you have to press the clock with the same hand that you use to move the pieces is there to prevent players from pressing ...


20

The short answer Yes, they do, although very few GMs do and by a margin of less than 10%. This does not seem to be due only to random factors (see long answer). An example is GM Joseph Gallagher. As you can see in his FIDE profile page, he has the following games record (as for 15 Dec. 2020): White +124 =118 -73, score = 58.1% Black +126 =124 -67, score = ...


19

Pawn - 1 point Bishop, Knight - 3 Pawns Rook - 5 Pawns Queen - 9 Pawns The evaluation depends on the position. In some situation you will find it equal or good to give you Rook and Pawn (6 Pawns) for Bishop and Knight (6 Pawns). But it is also possible that two light pieces are more valuable than Rook and Pawn. The value of pieces given to you will be a good ...


19

The relevant section from the rules would be Article 7.4.1: If a player displaces one or more pieces, he shall re-establish the correct position in his own time. The rules do not specify a certain procedure, but what I have seen happening in practice is: Player A knocks a piece over on his opponent's time. Player B is now allowed to press the clock to ...


18

Yes, press the clock with the same hand you use to move pieces is an actual rule in official tournaments (see Article 6.2.b of the FIDE Laws of chess). Concerning the placement of the clock before the game, "the arbiter shall decide where the chessclock is placed" (see Article 6.5 in the same link as above). However the arbiter doesn't always give a ...


18

When FIDE tournament rules apply: If you displace one or more pieces – knocking off the board, intentionally or unintentionally, is a displacement – you have to re-establish the correct position on your own time (Art. 7.4.1). While it is not specifically mentioned, I would say that you have to do this at once; if you wait, that could be regarded as an ...


18

It starts with the board being setup correctly, and that means a light square in the right-hand corner. Then, the queens each go on their own color. [FEN ""]


17

According to the Laws of Chess: 7.4.1 If a player displaces one or more pieces, he shall re-establish the correct position in his own time. Of course, in this situation, it is not the player who displaced one or more pieces. I believe that another rule would therefore be in effect: 7.6 If, during a game it is found that any piece has been displaced ...


15

You might look for a chess set font. Here are several. Licensing information is included. It looks like they have been scanned from old books in some cases.


14

There's a great analysis/article about this by GM Larry Kaufman available here. To summarize: Pawn = 1 Knight = Bishop = 3.25 Bishop Pair = 7(+0.25 for each bishop.) Rook = 5 Queen = 9.75 There's also a lot more detail in the article about what situations favor which groups of pieces. For example, when B+N is better than R+P, or when Q+P is better than R+R,...


14

I believe that the chess pieces are supposed to constitute an army - I'll try to give a breakdown of how each individual name evolved. Xianqi, or Chinese Chess, originally developed in India before spreading across the world. Xianqi is the Chinese interpretation of the ancient game, and the pieces do really sound like those that would be in an army - ...


14

I don't think "full piece" means anything beyond "piece" but "full" was added for emphasis. This is to highlight the magnitude of the blunder, since many blunders are smaller than a piece; for example, one can blunder a pawn or the Exchange (rook for knight or bishop), or trade a piece for a pawn or two. The commonly used terms to distinguish queen/rook vs ...


14

When did this happen? Because there is no reasonable interpretation of the current rules by which a TD should have upheld the touch-move claim. I went back and looked at the 3rd Edition rulebook, and it doesn't say that a piece has to be "on the chessboard" to count for touch-move. So in 1987, a TD who was being a "strict constructionist" about the rules ...


14

First the board must be correct. Put the white square in the right hand corner nearest to you. Then put the queens on their color in the center of the board on the row closest to you. White queen on white. Black queen on Black. Finally put the kings next to the queens in the center of the board. That link you gave is not that useful. For the rest of ...


13

Unicode has chess piece icons in it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_symbols_in_Unicode This means you could look for a font which includes the chess symbol unicode block and has a license which fits your purpose. Most fonts are in TrueType format which is already vector-based and can be converted to SVG with Apache SVG Font Converter. This would mean ...


13

White scores about 54%, which is quite different from White winning 54% of all game, more so considering how draws occur more often between stronger players. None of the top players score better as Black, and I doubt there are grandmasters who do. If that were the case, it'd definitely be due to a small sample. I used to have a better score as Black back ...


12

You need to understand that the point system is only a rough guideline meant to assist you in evaluating positions or in deciding on potential exchanges. Many factors, particularly the pawn structure, influences how valuable pieces are. Rooks tend to be better in open positions with fewer pieces/pawns on the board, bishops can get hindered in closed ...


10

It's possible to use logistic regression (a statistical method) to estimate the predictive values. This way, you wouldn't need anyone to try the game at all. http://www.sumsar.net/blog/2015/06/big-data-and-chess has the details. I personally tried the method, and it was a good start. The method estimates the value of each piece by predicting how they ...


10

Ralph Betza tried to do this and he wrote a series of six articles about this, starting with this one: http://www.chessvariants.com/piececlopedia.dir/ideal-and-practical-values.html Ideas to determine the piece values include the following factors average mobility (clearly the dominant factor, but hard to bring it down to numbers) colourboundness type of ...


10

Please note that those values are "abstract", later to be modified by the specifics of the position. For example, even though a knight appears 0.8 pawns less valuable than a bishop, it could be that bigger bonuses are awarded to well-placed knights than for well-placed bishops, turning the balance around. It's also worth noting that the "3 pawns equal a ...


9

This answer is extended from my comment to Ross Milikan's answer to your question Numerical FEN writing. There is a website devoted to counting the number of legal positions up to equivalence with given number of pieces. Currently they have results for positions with 2 to 8 pieces. 2: 462 3: 368,079 4: 125,...


9

Though one cannot trade one's king for other considerations -- and in this sense the king cannot be evaluated -- the king still has a practical strength as an attacking and defending piece in the many concrete positions in which no immediate mate is in view -- especially during the endgame. This strength can indeed be evaluated. World Champion Emanuel ...


9

Trading for the sake of trading is bound to be in your opponent's favour more often than not. Generally speaking, recapturing often activates the piece that can capture back. Consider two rooks on an open file, both protected by another, pretty passive rook on the a-file. The side that trades loses control of the open file and is stuck with the a-file rook, ...


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