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12

Though the previous answers have made some solid points, I think they have not yet given the main reason why algebraic notation has generally come to be preferred over descriptive notation: it is more absolute, less relative, than descriptive notation. What I mean is just this: in algebraic notation each square on the chessboard receives only one name, while ...


12

The two forms of notation you are referring to are called Descriptive Notation and Algebraic Notation respectively. Descriptive notation was the most used form from recent antiquity up until about 1970 in English speaking countries. Algebraic notation has been around since the 19th century, but didn't rise to its current prominence until the 20th century. ...


12

Best guess: the mistake occured before, on move 15 Entry errors are frequent when games are entered into a software, especially if they are not entered by one of the players. Here the operator must have made an error before move 19, reached an anomaly, and couldn't solve the mystery (or didn't have time to try, there are other games to be saved). In such ...


11

As of 2017.04.01, pgn-extract (version 17-38) does provide variation splitting functionality via its --splitvariants flag. So, if you want this in a Windows/Linux/Mac OS environment it is available. Disclosure: I am the author of pgn-extract.


11

Crafty Crafty is a strong chess programm and can be used with Winboard, Xboard and Scid. So it is available for all major operating systems. Scid Scid can maintain databases of chess games, you can analyse (end) games.The software is available for all major operating systems. Xboard Xboard is a user interface to the Internet Chess Server. It uses the X ...


10

From the specification: A basic SAN [Standard Algebraic Notation] move is given by listing the moving piece letter (omitted for pawns) followed by the destination square. Capture moves are denoted by the lower case letter "x" immediately prior to the destination square; pawn captures the file letter of the originating square of the capturing pawn ...


10

PyChess Is a chess client built in Python. You can use it's chess logic libraries without much trouble. http://code.google.com/p/pychess/source/browse/utilities/arena.py http://code.google.com/p/pychess/source/browse/utilities/blunders.py Are examples of how you you might use the libraries to control chess engines, but you can also use just the chess ...


9

Here is the author's page courtesy of archive.org. The zip file on that page includes the readme. Direct download of the zip file


9

Stockfish Stockfish (website and github) is an open source and very strong UCI engine. As such it can do all you are asking for, but usually requires a GUI in order to do so. You can however access all functionality via a command prompt/shell as well.


8

While it's not ambiguous (only Nfe3 is legal), it is better to be specific with Nfe3. Successful software can deal with both Ne3 and Nfe3, but not every pgn parser is perfect, and some beginners will appreciate the additional guidance.


8

Notepad ++ with option Language->Pascal highlights headers, move numbers, actual moves and comments with different colors. Works exactly as I would expect.


8

There is an extension for Vim (a great editor) that provides syntax highlighting for PGN. You can download Vim here. You can find the extension here.


8

From the PGN specification (http://www6.chessclub.com/help/PGN-spec): Neither the appearance nor the absence of either a check or checkmating indicator is used for disambiguation purposes. This means that if two (or more) pieces of the same type can move to the same square the differences in checking status of the moves does not allieviate the ...


8

PGN standards are described here. There are seven more-or-less required tags: [Event] [Site] [Date] [Round] [White] [Black] [Result] and many different supplemental tags, for example [WhiteElo] and [BlackElo] for the players' ratings, [Board] for the board number in team events, and [TimeControl] for information about the time-control used.


8

[Date "1910.01.07"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [White "Carl Schlechter"] [Black "Emanuel Lasker"] 1. e4 {Notes by J. R. Capablanca} e5 {This is Black's second move!} 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 * This is a sample PGN game. You'll just need { and } to enclose your comments. But you should use a chess program to do it for you. SCID is free and can do it for you.


8

Yes, ChessBase does more than just support them, it definitely uses them. Since I got here, due to how I write notation, de instead of dxe4, for example, I used to have problems getting the FEN board here to work. Now, I have figured it out, but I still input my answer into a ChessBase board first, including annotations, and then Home>Copy Game, paste it ...


7

Would this be what you are looking for? PGN-extract (A command line utility) http://www.cs.kent.ac.uk/people/staff/djb/pgn-extract/ I can see a flag in the feature doc that might help: -W[cm|epd|halg|lalg|elalg|san|uci] - specify the output format to use -Whalg is hyphenated long algebraic. -Wlalg is long algebraic -Welalg[PNBRQK] is enhanced long ...


7

I happen to be the author of the chessboard editor under discussion. Let me clarify the issue. This editor is supposed to enforce legal moves but it has a bug which prevents it from being able to make a pawn capture onto the final rank. Therefore it cannot notice that a black chessman controls the f1 square. If you place a black bishop on the a6-f1 diagonal ...


6

Ne3 is perfectly fine, every normal pgn viewer knows legal moves and will perform it correctly.


6

Found one, after googling for quite a while! Here is the diagram I just generated at the url http://www.chessvideos.tv/bimg/3etzqdenimww8.png Anand vs Gelfand Game 1 Grunfeld Defence, WCC 2012 The website to generate the diagram is http://www.chessvideos.tv/genboard.php [Edit] Found another one, this one is far better, it generates Animated gifs Anand ...


6

There is a detailed standard of PGN available, for instance here: PGN standard at the Wayback Machine. You will never see "e4 e6 f4" in a PGN file, since it is mandatory to mention the move number before white's move: "1.e4 e6 2.f4".


6

In order, 1) Not to my knowledge 2) Not to my knowledge 3) There are several things that make this sort of project non-trivial, even difficult. Not the least of which is following the piece, differentiating it from a hand gesture, for example. Also determining when the move stopped would be an interesting question for computer vision to solve. These kinds ...


6

Yes, there are two ways to add a text comment to a pgn file. The first is far more common: simply wrap the comment in {braces} 1. e4 {Best by test!} e5 The second is less common, but also a part of the official pgn spec1. An end of line comment is allowed if it is preceded by a semicolon 1. e4; Best by test! 1... e5 This is far more awkward to read ...


6

Yes there are easy ways to do this. I'm going to briefly show you one quick way of doing it in python, using the python-chess module. If the in-code comments are not enough, feel free to ask for clarifications or possible extensions of the code: To showcase a working example, I've taken a game between Adams and Kasparov, you can download the PGN from the ...


6

Lichess also uses them. When using the Study feature of Lichess, you can manually annotate a game with any of these symbols: If you then export your study or study chapter as a PGN file, it will include the annotations using NAG notation. Only the six traditional suffix annotations (!, ?, !!, ??, !?, ?!) are represented directly, without dollar signs, since ...


5

just found this: 8.2.3.4: Disambiguation Note that the above disambiguation is needed only to distinguish among moves of the same piece type to the same square; it is not used to distinguish among attacks of the same piece type to the same square. An example of this would be a position with two white knights, one on square c3 and one on ...


5

Chess engines normally don't read PGN. When they "start" they read a position that is encoded in a FEN notation. FEN is a powerful way to describe a chess position. From this position a sequence of moves can be given in a string. The most common way of communicating with a chess engine is via the UCI protocol: http://wbec-ridderkerk.nl/html/UCIProtocol.html ...


5

To answer your question if descriptive notation is dead, I would say YES. Even though it maybe more descriptive, it can be more confusing for newer players and the algebraic notation is so much more intuitive and simpler to understand. I have read books with the descriptive notation and sometimes I scratch my head.


5

That would be a rather complex task. Maybe a reasonable first step is to look into recognizing FEN position from a single image - for which more resources exists, for example: Create a FEN from a chess diagram picture Recommended pattern recognition technique for chess board


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