5

Yes, a double check is when two pieces give check at the same time. It doesn't matter how you got to that position. As to whether there's an error on that wiki, it's probably best to try to ask its author. Maybe they can provide the full list of positions for you to compare. I can think of two ways of giving double check while promoting. One is where you ...


5

The real speed in bitboards is created by precomputing the bitboards for every instance. This means that you already have the attacked squares for a rook on d4 and every other piece on every square. Even faster is to use magic bitboards, but that is too complicated for a forum. Although both are written in c, I suggest Crafty to understand bitboards ...


4

The bigger weights file corresponds to a larger Neural Network, which means more computation per node, but better evaluation per node.This is expected, and there is nothing that can make a bigger NN as fast as a smaller NN. The best solution is to use a small NN for blitz time control. I would personally recommend LD2 (available at Lc0.org/LD2)


2

It looks like your engine is using very simple for loop and arrays. Your code simply loop over again and again, possibly repeat each search iteration. That’s obviously not good. Chess engine can’t run fast if it has to loop like that. If the position had no check surely all CPU time wasted? My recommendation is change your data structure to a bitboard. ...


2

It may help to keep a list of each piece and the squares it attacks for the position. Then when a move occurs, you can reduce the work calculating for the pieces that don't move. Non-moving kings, knights, and pawns will attack the same squares as before. Non-moving queens, bishops, and rooks only need to be recalculated if a piece moved to or away from a ...


2

Yes, the case you mentioned would also qualify as a double check. But it also depends on what your definitions are. If the Perft result does consider that to not be a double check, it doesn't mean you have to abide by it.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible