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5

60 unoriginal pawn moves can be made in a game by quadrupling the pawns 4 times. One can use the same capture once in each column of 4. Then you can use the exact same move 1+3+3+3+3 times in each column. And finally in the black columns white can make a move (to row 3) and vice versa Total: 15*4 =60 Here is an example game. [FEN ""] 1. Nc3 Nc6 2. ...


3

Just a small addendum: As a Bf4 player who never plays London but his own obscure systems (which are extremely dangerous for both sides - in the days before computer preparation, I clobbered a few GMs with them I only play e3. My own experience is that the most doubly-edged Black plan is pestering b2 with his queen. e3 (developing, also keeping the option ...


3

The number of central pawns is one of the factor that matter in the evaluation of a position, but it's definitely not the only one. While I think both 3.e3 and 3.c3 are playable, 3.e3 helps your development, while 3.c3 does not. If Black takes on d4, White gets an amazing outpost on the e5 square. In fact, Black would wish he could put his e6 pawn on the &...


18

Chess strategy is complex and has several ingredients mingling at the same time. It is true that 3 c3 helps white mantaining two center pawns if black decides for a c:d4 pawn exchange. But black isn't forced to that and the move c3 has some incovenients. To list just two: blocks the c3 square which is the natural place for developing the Q-side knight; ...


5

Move 3 is a bit early for such positional evaluations, but some food for thoughts: after 3...cd 4.ed, e7-e6 will be played, rather sooner than later but then the pawn structure in the center is fixed, which makes it hard for Black to "exploit" his extra central pawn. Any expansion with ...f6 and ...e5 is out of question for at least the next 20 ...


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