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53

This sort of thing is what the Preface of the Laws of Chess is for: PREFACE The Laws of Chess cannot cover all possible situations that may arise during a game, nor can they regulate all administrative questions. Where cases are not precisely regulated by an Article of the Laws, it should be possible to reach a correct decision by studying ...


17

White intends to play c5, which will gain space on the queenside and severely cramp black's position (The b6 knight has no good square). On the other hand, e5 weakens white's control over d5 and f5 (e.g. Black can then go ...Ne7-f5). Black could also take advantage of the weak c4 and d5 squares with ...Na5 and ...Bc6. Keeping the pawn on e4 seems better. ...


16

There is no loophole. Rules 3.7.1 to 3.7.4 allow pawns to move forwards along the same file, or diagonally forwards onto an adjacent file. The only argument here seems to be that "forwards" is not explicitly defined but it is implicitly defined by 3.7.5.1 which beings with the following quote: "When a player, having the move, plays a pawn to the rank ...


14

I disagree that it is primarily about development. This is a very common theme, and it comes down to the fact that e5 is not easily defended by a pawn (aka "artificially isolated"). Bg4 soon will trade one of the pe5's defenders, and it will need constant watching. It is not a big deal that you will be trading the Bc8 on f3 since white already traded on c6 ...


14

This is a good question, as much as some may be instinctively frustrated by it, because finding room for improvement in rulesets is useful and can prevent future issues where arbitration is required. My understanding is that "front" is defined by the piece's colour, not it's rotational orientation. This is consistent with the definition of "last rank" in ...


12

e5 does nothing for you and helps your opponent. Why? First, it does nothing for your development. Much better would be d3 which releases the c1 bishop and protects the e pawn. If your opponent plays de then you retake de and he is left with doubled isolated pawns on the c file and an isolated pawn on the a file. If he doesn't then exchange queens he also ...


12

No matter how a chess piece is shaped, FIDE rules do not define "front" or any other direction relative to the orientation of the piece. Chess pieces do not have a front, rear, direction of advance, and so forth. Only the board has these.


9

Here's what I came up with. Bishop took me 3 moves: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.e4 f5 2.Be2 g5 3.Bh5# * Knight took me 3 moves as Black: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.e4 Nc6 2.Ne2 Nd4 3.g3 Nf3# * Pawn took me 5 moves: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - ...


9

The main ideas behind d4 serve several purposes. It threatens dxe5 winning material. It opens up your pieces, like the Bc1, in particular. It gains space since the trade on d4 leaves white with a pawn that is more central than black's d6 pawn. And probably most important, and this is typical of many double-king-pawn openings, and that is that it is easier ...


9

The official PDF of the FIDE Laws of Chess includes illustrations of the legal moves for each piece. These clearly show the white pawn moving "up" the file (including the two-square move from the starting rank), and the black pawn moving "down" (only one square, because it's shown away from the starting rank). Moving the pawn along a rank is explicitly ...


8

c4 is the usual beginner's mistake of releasing the tension unnecessarily. With the pawn on c5 you exert some pressure on d4 which can be increased with moves like Ne7-c6. When the pawn moves to c4 that pressure disappears. If you played Ne7 instead then taking the c5 pawn is bad for white. You are not going to retake immediately but instead play Nc6. This ...


6

In the pawns only, you don't need to move so many pawns. Getting the major pieces involved early seems to be fastest: [FEN ""] 1.e4 c5 2.Qh5 Qa5 3.Qxh7 Qxa2 4.Qxg7 Qxb2 5.Rxa7 Rxh2 6.Rxb7 Rxg2 7.Rxd7 Rxf2 8.Rxe7+ Kd8 9.Qxf7 Rxd2 10.Qf5 Qxc2 11.Qxc5 Qxe4+ * I was unable to find a faster version of the piece only.


6

Such scenarios arise occasionally in the late endgame. For example, this position is a win for white (LiChess): [fen "1k6/8/8/7p/P2P2pK/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] while a similar position (where white has fewer pawn islands) is a draw (LiChess): [fen "1k6/8/8/7p/PP4pK/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] In the first case, if black's king captures a pawn, the other white pawn ...


6

Regarding your last question: 3) Is there anyway I can easily find collections of quadrupled pawn game anywhere online? No need to look online, you can do this on your own. I've found 3 additional examples after parsing through roughly 300000 games of a TWIC DB: 1) [fen ""] [Event "FSIM May"] [Site "Budapest HUN"] [Date "1996.05.13"] [Round "11"...


6

I would say that type of formation leaves a lot of weak squares, as enemy pieces can occupy pretty much any dark square they want (mainly b4, d4, f4, h4) and start an attack from there with help from the pawns. These pieces will never ever be kicked away. White's light squared-bishop will also suffer because he has nowhere to go, so, for that strategy to be ...


6

First, although it is hard to disagree with the computer there, it is interesting that 8...c4 scores quite well for black in the Mega 2019 database (only a 43.8% for white). The first obvious thing that comes to mind is that anytime you change the base of attack on the pawn chain like that it does two related things (right now the base of attack is at d4 ...


6

The shortest explanation I can think of: if you play 1.e4 and 2.e5, presumably you want that pawn there for a reason. If you then immediately trade it off, you've lost whatever you were trying to achieve, like maybe space or central control. In the case with ...c5-c4 followed by b2-b3: again presumably you want that pawn to be there for some reason (...


6

To be frank, you hit the nail on the head: "White lost two moves to go to e5 only to be exchanged". After some explanation, in the last paragraph, I will give some basic lines as to why exchanging is probably best already. White is not developing, and since he cannot maintain the pawn on e5 easily, it is not good. That whole line starting with 2.e5 is also ...


6

Warning: I am only 1800 rated in lichess. I believe one reason for playing 3.d4 is that after the exchange on d4. White has a majority of pawns in the kingside which is one of the reasons to later mount an attack on the kingside. If Black tries to hold on to the square d5 with Nc6(Nd7), White can then play Bb5 putting under attack once again the d5 pawn. ...


5

Black is better here, but this is much more due to piece activity and coordination than to the pawn structure. Once upon a time (i.e. a century ago), it was thought that such structures gave a big advantage in endgames for the camp with 3 pawns on the queenside - because in the long term they can create an outer passed pawn. However, this has been debunked ...


5

More pawn islands is an endgame disadvantage, even a late endgame disadvantage because it means that the side with more pawn islands has more weaknesses to defend. The obvious advantage to more pawn islands is where one side has made pawn captures creating doubled pawns and half open files which can be used for an attack. These can give a temporary ...


4

Thanks to @DM once more for inspiration. I actually managed to beat his 11 moves for the Pawn Massacre. I got it down to 10 moves by opening with a pawn capture and having one less check. Sorry mate. I’ll keep yours as the answer though out of respect. [FEN ""] 1. e4 d5 exd5 Qxd5 Qh5 Qxa2 Qxh7 Qxb2 Qxg7 Rxh2 Rxa7 Rxg2 Rxb7 Rxf2 Rxc7 Rxd2 Rxe7+ Kd8 Qxf7 Qxc2


4

After some research I could not find any "official" definition by a chess association/federation. This doesn't really surprise me, as there really is no need for a definition of "e.p. checkmate" to ensure correct play. However the general internet consensus on the usage of the term seems to agree on the following requirements: The game has to end with ...


4

That kind of tension in the center is very double-edged. On the long term, the pawn exchanges in the center should favor Black: he will get a stronghold on d5 for a knight and the e5-pawn might turn into a weakness in the endgame. Also, exchanges of major pieces down the newly opened c- and d-files will reduce White's attacking chances on the kingside. In ...


4

Here's an example of 29 successive captures (White's 3rd to White's 17th). It is the solution (from White's 3rd onwards) of a massacre proof-game found by Gerd Wilts & Norbert Geissler: [Title "Gerd Wilts & Norbert Geissler; PDB P0005398"] [StartPly "4"] [fen "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.d3 d6 2. Bg5 Bg4 3. Bxe7 ...


4

I thought it would be interesting to try a variation of @Phonon's approach and treat the search as essentially a pattern-matching task using regular expressions. So, after performing the same expansion of a FEN and isolating the central six ranks, I passed the resulting string to the search function of Python's re package, looking for occurrences of pawn ...


4

White has for sure achieved various advantages: The white knight at d4 is well centred Black's pawn at d6 blocks the bishop on f8 from developing Black will probably complete development by putting bishop on e7, knight from b8 to d7 and castling, which is a solid but cramped position for a long time From a practical standpoint white's position is easier to ...


3

I found the game in the chess365.com database. Here's the link. Here is the search that I used to find it. Here's the game in the replayer. [FEN ""] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 Bd7 7. Be2 Qa5 8. Bxf6 gxf6 9. Nb3 Qg5 10. Nd5 Rc8 11. O-O Rg8 12. g3 f5 13. f4 Qg7 14. e5 dxe5 15. Nc5 Nd4 16. Nxd7 Nxc2 ...


3

To answer your first question, in these structures, white has more space and because of that, he can put his pieces in more advanced positions. Black's king is usually on the kingside in these positions which makes the e5 square a great square for a knight. If the knight was on c5, then black could play b6 and kick the knight out. When the knight lands on e5,...


3

The "on the same file" language already takes care of this. 2.4 The eight vertical columns of squares are called ‘files’ Moving based on some notional "facing'" of the pawn would take the pawn off the file.


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