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17

White intends to play c5, which will gain space on the queenside and severely cramp black's position (The b6 knight has no good square). On the other hand, e5 weakens white's control over d5 and f5 (e.g. Black can then go ...Ne7-f5). Black could also take advantage of the weak c4 and d5 squares with ...Na5 and ...Bc6. Keeping the pawn on e4 seems better. ...


7

It is, indeed, called a "pawn chain". It does not have any other special designation. There is no single best way to counter any specific pawn chain, as it is much more complex than that. Here is a bit on that. Pawn chains, and where you attack them, is the basis for all opening play. Where the pawns on both sides clash is called a pawn break. Knowing where ...


6

Regarding your last question: 3) Is there anyway I can easily find collections of quadrupled pawn game anywhere online? No need to look online, you can do this on your own. I've found 3 additional examples after parsing through roughly 300000 games of a TWIC DB: 1) [fen ""] [Event "FSIM May"] [Site "Budapest HUN"] [Date "1996.05.13"] [Round "11"...


6

I would say that type of formation leaves a lot of weak squares, as enemy pieces can occupy pretty much any dark square they want (mainly b4, d4, f4, h4) and start an attack from there with help from the pawns. These pieces will never ever be kicked away. White's light squared-bishop will also suffer because he has nowhere to go, so, for that strategy to be ...


6

The pawn structure in the Caro-Kann Classical Variation and the Scandinavian can be the exact same. The optimal pawn breaks are either pushing the c6 pawn to c5 or pushing the e6 pawn to e5. The differences are in the positions of the pieces, which is why far more people play the Caro-Kann than the Scandinavian. In the Scandinavian, black spends many tempi ...


6

Once you play d4 you are usually leaving the pure English opening and transposing to a queen-pawn opening. Objectively there are positions where it is absolutely better to transpose to a queen-pawn opening but you can certainly build a repertoire around playing the pawn to d3 -- it may just be easier for Black to equalize in some lines. The formation of c4,...


6

Such scenarios arise occasionally in the late endgame. For example, this position is a win for white (LiChess): [fen "1k6/8/8/7p/P2P2pK/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] while a similar position (where white has fewer pawn islands) is a draw (LiChess): [fen "1k6/8/8/7p/PP4pK/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] In the first case, if black's king captures a pawn, the other white pawn ...


5

More pawn islands is an endgame disadvantage, even a late endgame disadvantage because it means that the side with more pawn islands has more weaknesses to defend. The obvious advantage to more pawn islands is where one side has made pawn captures creating doubled pawns and half open files which can be used for an attack. These can give a temporary ...


5

Black is better here, but this is much more due to piece activity and coordination than to the pawn structure. Once upon a time (i.e. a century ago), it was thought that such structures gave a big advantage in endgames for the camp with 3 pawns on the queenside - because in the long term they can create an outer passed pawn. However, this has been debunked ...


5

It's a very general question, no concrete examples (where you struggle to defend) are provided in your post, and as such one cannot really answer meaningfully. However, here are some rough hints that might help you: Pawn structure is a key factor in king safety. Any pawn move commitments on the side you've castled should be taken into account with extreme ...


5

In this case, because you probably cannot maintain it, and it will become weak. The principles of not making too many pawn moves, and developing your k-side and pieces quickly take precedence. It may also be too early to determine that d5 will be the most useful move. [Title ""] [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. d5 e6 3. c4 (3. Nc3 Bb4 4. dxe6 fxe6) exd5 4. cxd5 ...


4

Apart from very obvious advice, e.g. an early castling. Believe me, I know my castling well. The first thing to note is that early castling is only recommended to complete beginners and in positions where the center is open. Castling too early in closed or semi-closed positions can be catastrophic. It is often wise to wait until you see which side your ...


4

I thought it would be interesting to try a variation of @Phonon's approach and treat the search as essentially a pattern-matching task using regular expressions. So, after performing the same expansion of a FEN and isolating the central six ranks, I passed the resulting string to the search function of Python's re package, looking for occurrences of pawn ...


4

It shouldn't be so much a question of why, but rather how to approach understanding a move like 2.d5. Otherwise one can endlessly ask questions of this nature and you cannot realistically be expected to learn every single of them independently. So shift your focus onto learning to adopt the strategic mindset and how to reason about opening theory. This will ...


3

It depends on your opponent's play and your own tastes. Neither are objectively better on their own merits. Yes, c4-d3-e4 does control the light squares, but it grossly weakens the central dark squares (especially d4). Your setup with c4,d4,e3 goes for broad central control, but is rather slow (sometimes allowing Black to strike first with ...d5). There's ...


3

I found the game in the chess365.com database. Here's the link. Here is the search that I used to find it. Here's the game in the replayer. [FEN ""] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 Bd7 7. Be2 Qa5 8. Bxf6 gxf6 9. Nb3 Qg5 10. Nd5 Rc8 11. O-O Rg8 12. g3 f5 13. f4 Qg7 14. e5 dxe5 15. Nc5 Nd4 16. Nxd7 Nxc2 ...


3

There is at least one case where your method will fail: pawns on f2, g3, h2 and h3. The structure is illegal, but drawing triangles from every pawn will not show this. To catch this, you'd have to draw the triangle from every square of the chessboard (h4 in this case demonstrates the illegality). So as you said, draw triangles, but instead of starting ...


3

To answer your question, there are no good openings that revolve around this "crab" pawn structure. This is because this structure takes a lot of pawn moves, decreases the mobility of your bishops, and creates weakness on the kingside. It would even be difficult to come up with a respectable variation of any opening that has this pawn structure (perhaps the ...


3

The pawn structures are the same, which means the typical pawn breaks are also the same. Black often tries for ...c5 and sometimes ...e5, while White always has a thematic d5 break in mind. However, in the Scandinavian Black must waste a few tempi moving his queen. This means that White's plan more often involves early attacks as opposed to the Caro-kann.


3

To answer your first question, in these structures, white has more space and because of that, he can put his pieces in more advanced positions. Black's king is usually on the kingside in these positions which makes the e5 square a great square for a knight. If the knight was on c5, then black could play b6 and kick the knight out. When the knight lands on e5,...


3

I don't remember where I read it, but this piece of general principle applies: In the opening, gaining space is great, but the priority is to develop your pieces. 2. d5 does indeed gain space, but it does nothing for development (White's pieces still have the same lines available to them). Furthermore, 2. d5 actually strains White's position because the d5-...


3

The drawback of 2. d5 is that it moves a pawn twice before other pawns and pieces have moved. As Black, I would counter with 2... c6, attacking the d5 pawn a second time (1... Nf6 already attacked it once). If White exchanges, 3. d5xc6 Nxc6, White has lost a lot of time moving the pawn a third time, and allowing Black to develop both knights. If White ...


2

Read My System by Nimzowitch. You need to see examples where the isolated passed pawn is weak, and examples where it is strong. If your judgement on the matter can be consistently more accurate than that of your opponents, you will win a lot of games


2

This is an old question, but it brings up a very relevant chess point that no one above has touched on: In any position, allowing the area of the board you are playing in to become locked is usually positional suicide. Once your area is locked, the only hope is a sacrifice to open it...in this case, it will never come to fruition. The computer only gives ...


2

over 2 years too late to the party, but Axel Smith's 'Pump Up Your Rating' has a wonderful section dedicated to pawn levers. Such a great book!


2

In general, the player with more central control has the means to start a successful attack on the opponent's king. This is just a fact of chess, but I'll list a few reasons for it: The player who controls the centre can use the central squares for efficiently maneuvering his pieces across the board. This plays well with a fast attack. Central control ...


2

There is a lot of material available, both in books and on the internet, about how to play isolated Queens pawn positions for both sides, but you ask one very simple question that has a short answer. You ask if there is any basis in the pawn structure for White to launch a King-side attack. There is, but is a bit indirect. If white plays passively, he may ...


2

I guess one case would be the outside passed pawn in a pawn endgame. i.e. if white has two kingside pawns and an a-pawn, and black has three kingside pawns. In that situation white will be winning usually. I wouldn't really think about pawn islands there though - it's a useful paradigm for evaluating pawn structures but it's not the only one.


2

I found a game on Tim Krabbe’s site Journal Entry #278) that gives a unique example of 6 pawns on the same file, 3 for each side! Here is the game. The 6 pawns in a row occurs on move 21. This is the record, and the limit, for most pawns on the same file by both sides in a professional chess game. [Title "Sevcikova - Blichova, ch girls u12 Slovakia, 1999, ...


2

Assuming black to move, black is definitely better, but he still must make sure that his Be6 cannot be driven to the unfavorable c8 square, or that too many trades occur along the d-file. I concur with Evargalo that the slight pull is primarily due to activity, and due to control of the only open file. In addition, white's queenside can be attacked soon. In ...


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