13

This is a very common kind of endgame, where you have a pawn majority on one side and fight against a single pawn in the center. Winning this is not difficult, but let's first look at your game... You fixed the position of the queenside pawns by playing b6 (to which white cleverly replied b5 ran with your king towards the queenside Basically you should ...


12

With the exception of Hans Kmoch's attempt to give it a name, which never caught on (I have never seen anyone else use it anywhere), they really do not have a name that I have even seen. I probably have seen this referred to mostly as "two opposing pawns", but that is really just English rather than a specific chess term.


9

I'm not familiar with the book itself, but for learning pawn structures it isn't important to memorize every single thing. The key is to understand the general ideas behind each structure. E.g.: what are the main plans, which pawns are weaknesses, what squares work well as outposts for pieces, can the structure be changed as the game goes on, etc. Knowing ...


8

This is a very complicated subject since there are a lot of other factors that come into play so I will give some examples, but there are no general rules that apply in all circumstances. First, let's take this common opening structure from the Slav. In this equal position, black wanted in imbalance, and traded off the light-squared bishop, so in order to ...


8

I think what you're asking about is referred to as a "blocked pawn". There is another question here that asks basically the same question, except in reverse... A pawn can also be blocked by another of the opponent's pieces, rather than another pawn. In either case, it can't make any progress unless the pawn/piece blocking it somehow goes away, or unless ...


8

Typically you use a pawn storm to exchange pawns around the castled enemy king and thereby to open lines and diagonals for an attack. Most of the time you want a closed (to some extent) center in order to avoid counterplay in the center. In this sense your example 4 is not a typical use case for a pawn storm. It might make sense to push the pawns here as ...


7

A lot of chess is “what pawn break am I looking for, and how do I accomplish it?” These answer that in depth. “Complete Chess Strategy” volumes 1,2 and 3 by Ludek Pachman. (This teaches about many basic plans, and what you are striving for with your pieces and pawns, especially. This made a light go off in my head, and THIS is what made me a master.) “Pawn ...


7

I think you should avoid taking on e3, even though it is objectively winning, this gives your opponent a passed pawn on e-file and exposes your f3-pawn (which is a big headache for white), this complicates the game. If you don't take on e3 yourself, you opponent can force you with a5, is there a way to stop that? Yes, there is: play 1...a5 yourself, if 2....


6

Black is better here, but this is much more due to piece activity and coordination than to the pawn structure. Once upon a time (i.e. a century ago), it was thought that such structures gave a big advantage in endgames for the camp with 3 pawns on the queenside - because in the long term they can create an outer passed pawn. However, this has been debunked ...


6

I would say that type of formation leaves a lot of weak squares, as enemy pieces can occupy pretty much any dark square they want (mainly b4, d4, f4, h4) and start an attack from there with help from the pawns. These pieces will never ever be kicked away. White's light squared-bishop will also suffer because he has nowhere to go, so, for that strategy to be ...


6

The main purpose of a pawn storm is to exchange pawns and open lines. Therefore, in the ideal case you should push the pawn that can easily be exchanged. With a Black pawn on g6, it makes sense to play h4-h5. The only way White's g-pawn could be directly exchanged would be if Black had a pawn on h6 (as is the case in your first diagram). However, g4 can be ...


5

In this case, because you probably cannot maintain it, and it will become weak. The principles of not making too many pawn moves, and developing your k-side and pieces quickly take precedence. It may also be too early to determine that d5 will be the most useful move. [Title ""] [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. d5 e6 3. c4 (3. Nc3 Bb4 4. dxe6 fxe6) exd5 4. cxd5 ...


5

Here is a complete list of pawn structure books divided into two categories, opening, and general pawn play. "Chess Structures: A Grandmaster Guide" by GM Mauricio Flores Rios is the single best book on OPENING pawn structures currently out there, but it misses some. "Pawn Structure Chess" by GM Andy Soltis is VERY weak in the analysis, but the general ...


5

It's a very general question, no concrete examples (where you struggle to defend) are provided in your post, and as such one cannot really answer meaningfully. However, here are some rough hints that might help you: Pawn structure is a key factor in king safety. Any pawn move commitments on the side you've castled should be taken into account with extreme ...


5

It is, indeed, called a "pawn chain". It does not have any other special designation. There is no single best way to counter any specific pawn chain, as it is much more complex than that. Here is a bit on that. Pawn chains, and where you attack them, is the basis for all opening play. Where the pawns on both sides clash is called a pawn break. Knowing where ...


5

Every move has pros and cons. Move a pawn, for example, and you gain space, and control squares; but you also weaken squares. The trick is to accurately determine if you will be able to use your pros better than your opponent can use your new-found weaknesses against you. Always remember that a “weakness” is only a weakness if your opponent can get at it, ...


5

I'm assuming you're mainly referring to the central pawn mass - wanting to get a structure with a Black pawn on b3 seems too specific. In general, it's much harder to deliberately maneuver the game into a line where you are the person with the pawn on d4 (or if you're playing White, with the pawn on d5). This is because you need to get your opponent to ...


5

Interesting opponent you have there, to let you get to that pawn formation. And yes, I said let, because the two most often played moves in that variation (e5 and exd5) both render that pawn structure pretty much impossible. I used to play the White side of that a lot, myself, but I always responded to Black's ...d5 with d4 (love making Alekhine players play ...


4

The drawback of 2. d5 is that it moves a pawn twice before other pawns and pieces have moved. As Black, I would counter with 2... c6, attacking the d5 pawn a second time (1... Nf6 already attacked it once). If White exchanges, 3. d5xc6 Nxc6, White has lost a lot of time moving the pawn a third time, and allowing Black to develop both knights. If White ...


4

I don't remember where I read it, but this piece of general principle applies: In the opening, gaining space is great, but the priority is to develop your pieces. 2. d5 does indeed gain space, but it does nothing for development (White's pieces still have the same lines available to them). Furthermore, 2. d5 actually strains White's position because the d5-...


4

Apart from very obvious advice, e.g. an early castling. Believe me, I know my castling well. The first thing to note is that early castling is only recommended to complete beginners and in positions where the center is open. Castling too early in closed or semi-closed positions can be catastrophic. It is often wise to wait until you see which side your ...


4

According to this post, pawns that block each other are called a "ram".


4

It comes down to the VERY poor placement of the white pieces, in particular, that the Bd3 is vulnerable to being trapped by the advancing black queenside pawns. Taking with the knight also allows you to open the center with d5 in some lines (which also will make the Qd1 uncomfortable since it lacks space), taking advantage of your better-placed pieces, and ...


4

In the various standard variations of QGD, the answers to this question are somewhat different, but you should keep in mind Black's main goals. Black's main problem is that they don't have enough good places for all of their bishops and knights. The worst piece is the light-square bishop, but the other minor pieces are also problematic. Hence Black's main ...


4

I'd play h4 in positions 3 and 4, without losing the g4 tmepo. As for 1 and 2, I'd follow the same criteria except if Black's ...h5 reaction is strong enough to give me a reason to play g4


4

Are you sure about the FEN, particularly the black pawn on b3? Also a white pawn is missing. Ignoring the a-b and g-h pawns and focusing on the central pawns.... It is very unusual to get that much space as a black player. So no, unless your opponent plays particularly passively, you are not going to get such structure in any opening. The structure ...


3

It shouldn't be so much a question of why, but rather how to approach understanding a move like 2.d5. Otherwise one can endlessly ask questions of this nature and you cannot realistically be expected to learn every single of them independently. So shift your focus onto learning to adopt the strategic mindset and how to reason about opening theory. This will ...


3

Something very similar is doubtless encoded into AlphaZero and Leela's neural network evaluators, which are very positional. Most conventional Minimax engines, by contrast, are stronger at tactics and can therefore search very deeply. Pawn structure is indeed a factor in most of the top engines' evaluation. This might take the relatively simple form of ...


3

There is at least one case where your method will fail: pawns on f2, g3, h2 and h3. The structure is illegal, but drawing triangles from every pawn will not show this. To catch this, you'd have to draw the triangle from every square of the chessboard (h4 in this case demonstrates the illegality). So as you said, draw triangles, but instead of starting ...


3

...c5 followed by ...Qa5 is indeed a very important trick in the Pirc defense in order to reach a dragonlike pawn structure. However, it can only work after you have developed your bishop to g7, adding pressure on the dark squares. Compare rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 c5 6. dxc5 ...


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