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This is a very complicated subject since there are a lot of other factors that come into play so I will give some examples, but there are no general rules that apply in all circumstances. First, let's take this common opening structure from the Slav. In this equal position, black wanted in imbalance, and traded off the light-squared bishop, so in order to ...


8

A lot of chess is “what pawn break am I looking for, and how do I accomplish it?” These answer that in depth. “Complete Chess Strategy” volumes 1,2 and 3 by Ludek Pachman. (This teaches about many basic plans, and what you are striving for with your pieces and pawns, especially. This made a light go off in my head, and THIS is what made me a master.) “Pawn ...


6

@Marcelo, it really depends on what you mean by "preparing". If you mean that VERY specifically "what specific moves" in every case, that is too general, and there are no such books. If you mean that as "how do I play for a pawn break", in general, then you are really just asking about pawn play, and pawn structures. Here is a fairly complete list of ...


4

Here is a complete list of pawn structure books divided into two categories, opening, and general pawn play. "Chess Structures: A Grandmaster Guide" by GM Mauricio Flores Rios is the single best book on OPENING pawn structures currently out there, but it misses some. "Pawn Structure Chess" by GM Andy Soltis is VERY weak in the analysis, but the general ...


4

More often than not, the Bishop pair will compensate for doubled pawns in an endgame. Your unopposed bishop would have to be pretty bad (and therefore your overall position) if it's influence did not compensate. In general doubled-pawns are not that bad if you have active piece play. Look at the games from the Kasparov-Short world championship match. ...


2

But it is hard to believe there is no chess book just about preparatory moves, especially with the pawns. This is the very soul of chess in my opinion The reason is that it is a small subject. That is not to say that there are not several excellent chapters in different books dealing with this subject. Far away the best such is the very first chapter ...


1

I think the chess youtuber with the channel that goes by the name of Hanging Pawns has a lot of good explanations about structure/openings. I downloaded a very nice book about it, but I suspect that I'm not yet on the appropriate level to concentrate on it, the book is called: Chess Structures: A Grandmaster Guide - by Mauricio Flores Rios.


1

It depends on the position, but a bishop is generally considered strong of play is on both sides of the boards and it's an open board. I would think that a sample position would help to understand what are you trying to point out.


1

You are saying that you do not see why White should attack on the Kingside as "White does not have a majority of pawns in the kingside.". This assumes that attacking means starting a sort of pawn storm in every case, but that is not correct. It may sound weird, but in Isolani positions, you have better attacking prospects mostly because your pawn does not ...


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