24

The Colle is definitely not an aggressive opening in the classical sense. If you like the positions that you get with the Colle, by all means, play it to your heart's content. The Colle is a very conservative opening because white plays d4 and then really doesn't make any other moves to occupy the center. Playing for theoretical equality as white might be ...


21

First of all, the isolated pawn is a dynamic strength, and a static weakness. But what does this mean? This means that he represents a pawn weakness, but compensates this weakness in some other way. In short, Black should strive towards endgame, while White must obtain some sort of pressure/attack in order to compensate for his weak d-pawn. Why is this ...


17

White intends to play c5, which will gain space on the queenside and severely cramp black's position (The b6 knight has no good square). On the other hand, e5 weakens white's control over d5 and f5 (e.g. Black can then go ...Ne7-f5). Black could also take advantage of the weak c4 and d5 squares with ...Na5 and ...Bc6. Keeping the pawn on e4 seems better. ...


15

A pawn break is a pawn move designed to free the player's position. Generally speaking, a pawn move is only called a pawn break when the moving pawn is on a file adjacent to two enemy pawns facing each other, and the pawn moves forward to the same rank as the player's other pawn. Since a picture is worth a thousand words... White can play either 1. c3 or ...


14

Here are a very few principles which are key: Centralize/activate/use your king. In the endgame he is one of your strongest pieces, and needs to be utilized. When you have the advantage, exchange pieces, and don't exchange pawns. Every exchange of pawns means one less potential promotion for the side with the advantage. Passed pawns must be pushed, and ...


14

It's a mistake to view the pawns themselves as overextended targets that you might get to "pick off" as you say in your post. After all, Black's main objective with the pawn storm is probably to open up lines to attack your king, and so your snapping up such overextended pawns really only furthers Black's goal. As already pointed out in comments in this ...


14

Black usually reaches the Stonewall formation from the Dutch Defense (though QGD is an option as well, if he/she postpones Nf6) and involves putting pawns on c6, d5, e6 and f5. These pawns guarantee a strong grip on the light squares in the center (especially e4, which is often occupied by a knight later on), but weaken the dark squares. Another problem for ...


13

The question is extremely open, as these pawns may be moved for many reasons depending on the position you are facing. In a general sketch, you may consider five kind of a and h pawn moves: To create some luft for the king, that is, avoid once and for all the back rank threats. [FEN "r5k1/5ppp/8/8/8/8/5PPP/1R4K1 w - - 0 1"] In this position, neither rook ...


13

This is a very common kind of endgame, where you have a pawn majority on one side and fight against a single pawn in the center. Winning this is not difficult, but let's first look at your game... You fixed the position of the queenside pawns by playing b6 (to which white cleverly replied b5 ran with your king towards the queenside Basically you should ...


12

It seems like there are really 3 parts to your question: When and how should pawn breaks be made? How should rooks be placed to support pawn pushes? How should plans be made around pawn breaks? As a disclaimer, these questions are incredibly complicated, so take this answer as a starting point. Entire books have been written about pawn play. ...


12

From the Wikipedia article that you linked to: The downsides to the Stonewall are the hole on e4, and the fact that the dark squared bishop on c1 is completely blocked by its own pawns. If Black defends correctly against White's attack, these strategic deficiencies can become quite serious. Because of this, the Stonewall Attack is almost never seen in ...


12

According to Tim Krabbé, Kovacs - Barth, Balatonbereny 1994 was the game with the longest living quadrupled pawns (23 moves). That would imply that he (an authority when it comes to chess records) doesn't know of any games with quintupled pawns.


12

With the exception of Hans Kmoch's attempt to give it a name, which never caught on (I have never seen anyone else use it anywhere), they really do not have a name that I have even seen. I probably have seen this referred to mostly as "two opposing pawns", but that is really just English rather than a specific chess term.


11

It's definitely not a good idea. If it were one, there would be a real opening for it. One problem with moving all your white-squared pawns 1 space forward, is that you lose so many moves developing your pieces. However, this is the 'small' disadvantage. The big one is, that all of your white squares are very weak. Look at this position: [fen ""] 1. a3 e5 ...


11

Wikipedia mentions Alekhine-Nenarokov 1907 and van der Wiel-Hort 1981 as two (and by no means the only) games with quadrupled pawns. I can find no mention of quintupled pawns.


10

It looks like a reasonable system to me as the structure, and the ideas behind the moves look fairly easy to understand. As for being aggressive, it's the type of aggression that slowly builds up with an aim towards the kingside, successfully doing this might be the hard part of this system. If you don't follow through and restrict Black in some way, there ...


10

What is the idea behind 4... c5? Basically the same ideas as behind playing c4 in the Queen's gambit: challenging the center, potentially exchanging the c-pawn for a valuable central pawn, opening the c file for a rook, giving the knight a square on c6 (which is often a better square for the knight if the pawn has moved to c5 already) potentially ...


9

In order to make progress, one or both of you need to break through that wall. Each of you seem to have the best chances on the side near the opponent's King--you have a passer on the kingside; your opponent has a lot of pressure on your queenside. First, look at his threats. ...b5-b4 seems to force the issue on the queenside by kicking your Knight and ...


9

This is a dead draw. There are no sensible piece sacrifices for either side. There is no plan that isn't easily parried (Black could gang up on the a5-pawn with Qd8 and Bc7, but white just doubles the rooks on a1 and a2. White could try to invade with the knight to b6 and d5, but black would just go Bxa4 when the knight turns up on a4.) Black isn't ...


9

A good opening for Black seldom is a great choice for White even with a tempo up. Grandmaster Alex Yermolinsky discusses reasons for this in his book "The Road to Chess Improvement". One of the main reasons is that the opening goals are not the same for both sides in the opening, and schemes that are suitable for defense or counterattack are much less ...


9

I'm not familiar with the book itself, but for learning pawn structures it isn't important to memorize every single thing. The key is to understand the general ideas behind each structure. E.g.: what are the main plans, which pawns are weaknesses, what squares work well as outposts for pieces, can the structure be changed as the game goes on, etc. Knowing ...


8

In one sense, I would simply say, "Yes, the pawn structure would be the first indicator that one has entered/transposed into a given opening." But since there's no other answer here as of yet, I'm going to take the liberty to say a bit more, pushing a little further than the question as you asked it. Not to put too fine a point on it, but here's one way to ...


8

The issue with your opening strategy is that you neglect the development of your pieces. While you are pushing your pawns, your opponent will bring their pieces into the game. In general, the three most important guidelines of the opening are: Controlling the center. The closer a piece is to the center, the more influential it becomes. Developing your ...


8

Isolated double pawns like in your example are considered to be both a static and a dynamic weakness. It is a static weakness since the pawns can no longer defend each other or be defended by other pawns. It is a dynamic weakness since the front pawn is blocking the advance of the pawn behind. It is strategically important for the opposing player to control ...


8

EDITED IN RESPONSE TO COMMENT MADE BY MEMBER DagOskarMadsen: Endgame remains a draw, but there was a mistake in my analysis-I hereby thank member DagOskarMadsen for pointing it out. I have updated my answer with the proper drawing move, and have left the bad variation as a sideline and marked it with ?? so it can be noticed more easily. I have also more ...


8

White cannot break this Great Wall of China in this position. In fact, White is slightly worse and here's why - 1. Pawn chain Black's pawn structure is better than White's. The pawn on e6 is the base of Black's pawn chain and it is almost impossible for White to have any attack on that. True, White could possibly bring a knight to f4, but that's not ...


8

This is a very complicated subject since there are a lot of other factors that come into play so I will give some examples, but there are no general rules that apply in all circumstances. First, let's take this common opening structure from the Slav. In this equal position, black wanted in imbalance, and traded off the light-squared bishop, so in order to ...


8

I think what you're asking about is referred to as a "blocked pawn". There is another question here that asks basically the same question, except in reverse... A pawn can also be blocked by another of the opponent's pieces, rather than another pawn. In either case, it can't make any progress unless the pawn/piece blocking it somehow goes away, or unless ...


8

Typically you use a pawn storm to exchange pawns around the castled enemy king and thereby to open lines and diagonals for an attack. Most of the time you want a closed (to some extent) center in order to avoid counterplay in the center. In this sense your example 4 is not a typical use case for a pawn storm. It might make sense to push the pawns here as ...


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