15

I suppose what is comes down to is that the way 3.8.2 is written can be argued to have a syntactic ambiguity. 3.8.2 can mean either "This is a move of the king, and either rook of the same colour, along the player’s first rank," or "This is a move of the king and either rook of the same colour along the player’s first rank." There's no ...


15

Is there any glaring flaw in this rules lawyer case, or is it solid until FIDE fixes it? Yes, there is a glaring flaw in your case. The rook and king have to be on the same rank. This is clear from the text of the rule and the diagrams which follow. Here is the text from the latest FIDE Laws of Chess: 3.8.2 by ‘castling’. This is a move of the king and ...


13

Intuitive plan Notice that black's last check is pushing the white king one row away from their passed e-pawn. Once black promotes the b-pawn, white will have to give up the rook for it. After which white's king is simply not in position to cover the advance of the e-pawn and therefore additional tempi will have to be spent with king moves to try and reach ...


12

So if your opponent promotes a pawn to a Queen and accidentally places your Queen on the board instead of his own, can you claim a win because of an illegal move? No, you can't. There is no illegal move until the player either presses the clock or makes another move (after the opponent has moved). Here is what the FIDE Laws of Chess have to say: 3.7....


10

In short, the plan you proposed is possible, but it is just too slow, even if black allows it, which is not mandatory. If black permits it, here is a simple win that, although I checked it with a computer, I could see it in my head fairly easily, which means those two could see it that much more easily. [FEN "8/8/1R4p1/4P1P1/2r2K1p/7P/1p6/2k5 w - - 0 1"] ...


9

I found a few references, but the best one was this article on chessbase.com that seems to attribute it to Yuri Dorogov, who was born in in 1947. From that article, it is still not 100% clear if Dorogov created the puzzle and story, or was just the name of the person the creator used in the story, but Dorogov is a real person. This is a quote from the ...


8

In Tim Krabbe’s chess records, Krabbe gives a game where the Black player promoted four of their pawns, the most one player has ever gotten in a professional game, and only one where it has happened. It is also notable for being one of few games with 6 promotions. The game can also be viewed here at ChessDB.com. [Title "Alena Kubikova-Vaclav Novy, 9th Open,...


7

Well, according to endgame tablebases, g8=R is a loss in 63 ply and g8=Q is a draw. So g8=Q is definitely better... https://syzygy-tables.info/?fen=8/3k2PB/q7/8/4K3/8/8/8_w_-_-_0_1


7

There is no valid human reason. The difference between Kc4 (mate in 12), and Kc2 (mate in 10) is fairly irrelevant. It simply appended the "?!" based on the algorithm that 10 is slightly worse than 12. Either way, it is, indeed, a simple win from there. By the way, my plan would be Rd7, then bring the king to h1/g1, and only then, bring the rook over via ...


6

While it may appear that White can whisk around Black's rook and promote, there is a indeed problem that you have missed: Black can promote first! White's king is currently in check from Black's rook, so the monarch must be moved to either the f3 or e3, cutting the king off from half of the board. Since White lost a tempo moving their king, Black now ...


5

Since the board is mirrored, the pawn is on b7 and the rook on a8. But b7xa8 promoting to a piece is a valid move. I'm not sure which program/website this is, but it could be that a popup is asking to which piece White wants to promote, and something/your browser is blocking this popup, and your friend cannot complete the move.


4

I first saw saw this problem in Chess Life from 1972, p. 308.


3

In this case, g8=Q is certainly better, since it makes black have to struggle for the draw, and g8=R would make white struggle for the draw.


3

Black plays from 7th and 8th rank, his king starting from e8, so the white pawn is on b7. There is no (FIDE) rule that forbids a combination of taking and promotion. b7xa8D (or whatever) is a legal move. When playing online at some minor platform, you will often find that the rules of chess are badly implemented. I know of no single platform that plays ...


3

@SmallChess is right. This position is absolutely hopeless for White, and there is a very human strategy for Black, which consists here in not exchanging pieces, but hunting the white king. This strategy will force White to exchange pieces unfavorably or White will lose material to avoid being mate. The principle behind this strategy is simple "with three ...


3

The simplest and the smoothest rule for play is to say that if a player has multiple kings, they are not royal, i.e. they aren't subject to check and can just be captured. When a player is reduced to having only one king to lead his army, the normal rules apply. The mate-one-to-win rule means it is disadvantageous to promote to a king, while mate-all-to-win ...


3

Not all the games are by strong players, let alone, players, who are well-known, but here is a complete list in the Mega 2019 database. If you would like to see a particular game, or two, I can post the PGN, and add it to this answer. This one is interesting since one of players is famous, and both promotions happened so early in the game. [Event "...


3

It can be a useful under promotion in opening traps. For instance there is a known trap line in the Albin Counter Gambit with a winning knight promotion. It's called the Lasker trap: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albin_Countergambit [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w Qkq - 0 1"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e5 3. dxe5 d4 4. e3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 dxe3 6. Bxb4 ...


3

ChessBase allows you to search for positions with promotions to each piece, with or without check. In the Mega 2019 database, there are 8,266,473 games. In those games, there are 486,622 promotions to queen; 7,223 promotions to knight; 1,486 promotions to bishop; and 9,606 promotions to rook. Of the 7,223 promotions to knight, 5,733 came with check, or 79.3%...


2

Often engines will promote to a knight if the promoted piece is going to be immediately captured. This is just because the promotions are equally good and thus it's chosen randomly. Sometimes it just.. doesn't matter, so why not promote to a knight? Plus, it's nice to say you promoted to a knight in a chess game.


2

I have found examples of the open cases from Laska's answer, with the first one being an old composition and the second one amodern one. To answer the question directly, the occurrence percentages of these cases happening are also 0%. Case #1 [Title "Gyula Breyer, Magyar Sakkvilag, 1918, White To Play And Win"] [FEN "1N1bknbr/2p1Pn1p/2K1Rp1p/...


2

Imagine there'd be no other pawns on the board, except for the b2 pawn and the e5 pawn. Then ask yourself the question: is black's position won? If the answer is yes, there is no need for calculation, right? The answer is yes, because of an elementary (yet crucial) manoeuvre: keeping the black rook on the fourth rank, thereby cutting off the enemy king. ...


2

On Lichess, inaccuracies are denoted ?!, mistakes by ? and blunders by ??. You can click on the `x inaccuracies/x mistakes/ x blunders' to move between these. The move was inaccurate since it reduced a forced mate from 16 moves (Kc3) to 13 moves. Lichess marks inaccuracies for large checkmate sequences, since humans aren't expected to find these.


2

The move is legal. If it were blacks move the computer would block it. If White were in check the computer would too. LIke @Glorfindel said the popup probably asked for which piece so blocking it stopped the move. But in that case you should still not have been able to push straight instead of capturing. Do tell us what program/website that was! I do not ...


2

The position looks clearly winning for Black, and I don't think it makes much of a difference whether you exchange knights or not. It might make your task simpler, but Black's knight could be a bit stronger than White's. To win all you really have to do is push one of your pawns, with the support of the king. Your other pieces can be used to block checks, ...


1

Yes, if it prolongs and "shortens" the game if you're losing or winning respectively. And there are tablebases for 7 pcs or less. Which means chess is solved with 7 pcs on the board.


1

I finally got around to reading the book Chess To Enjoy by Andrew Soltis after I found that I could borrow it on the Internet Archive. The problem appears on page 207, and the last name "Dorogov" is mentioned, which means that the suspected composer Yuri Dorogov is named in the story attached to the problem, with the usual alien vs person situation. On page ...


1

That would be an illegal move, so rule 7.5.1 should apply - when it is found that an illegal move has been completed, the position before that move shall be reinstated. And yes, you can claim a win due to the illegal move (assuming that in the given situation an illegal move loses - usually when the opponent already made another illegal move before), just as ...


1

Here are some more extreme situations to consider. The first two diagrams are merely for completeness. [Title "Grigory Popov, Super Problem (Website) 2009, Mate In 10 Moves"] [FEN "R2rr2n/PP1PPPPP/2pn4/b1N1kp2/4Np2/3K4/2p5/1q6 w - - 0 1"] 1. gxh8=Q+ Rxh8 2. e8=Q+ Nxe8 3. fxe8=Q+ Rhxe8 4. b8=Q+ Qxb8 5. axb8=Q+ Rxb8 6. dxe8=Q+ Rxe8 7. Rxe8+ Kd5 8. Re5+ Kxe5 ...


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