13

EDIT: record is now 20.0 moves! (See below.) If we like pawns undoubled... [title "16 non-doubled passed pawns in 21.0 moves"] [fen ""] [startply "42"] 1. g4 h5 2. g5 Rh6 3. gxh6 g5 4. h4 g4 5. b4 e5 6. f4 e4 7. Nf3 exf3 8. e4 f5 9. e5 Qg5 10. Nc3 a5 11. Ne4 fxe4 12. c4 a4 13. Qb3 axb3 14. a4 b5 15. a5 d5 16. c5 Bd6 17. cxd6 c5 18. Ra4 c4 19. d4 Na6 20. ...


11

16 passed pawns in 26 moves. [fen ""] [startply "52"] 1. b4 a5 2. b5 Na6 3. bxa6 b6 4. Ba3 c6 5. Bb4 axb4 6. a4 b5 7. a5 c5 8. d3 c4 9. Nd2 Qc7 10. Nb3 cxb3 11. c4 d5 12. c5 d4 13. Qd2 e5 14. Qc3 dxc3 15. d4 e4 16. e3 Bh3 17. Bd3 exd3 18. gxh3 h5 19. Ne2 h4 20. Ng3 hxg3 21. h4 g5 22. h5 g4 23. h4 g2 24. f4 Qe5 25. fxe5 f5 26. e4 f4 *


11

The two previous answers both suggested that this position is a draw, but I believe it's a win for White. Stockfish 5 evaluates the position at more than +10 if left to run for long enough (e.g., to depth 40), which sounds pretty decisive, but of course Stockfish isn't infallible. I generated a FinalGen tablebase for the position, but unfortunately it wasn'...


9

I used to think the following draw by repetition looked optimal for complicated reasons (detailed below), but now I doubt it. White may well have a winning strategy, involving putting Black in zugzwang on both sides. See Stephen's answer. [FEN "8/pppk4/8/8/8/8/4KPPP/8 w - - 0 1 "] 1. h4 a5 2. h5 Ke7 3. h6 Kf6 4. g4 a4 5. Kd2 Kg6 6. g5 a3 7. Kc2 b5 8. Kb3 ...


9

There's a great analysis of the game here: 2012 FIDE World Chess Championship: Anand vs. Gelfand - Game 1. According to the video, it is easy for white to get one of his rooks behind that pawn especially when both players are left with 1 rook, 1 bishop each.


8

As a complement to previous answers, notice that although this endgame should be a theoretical win for the bishops, it is not as straightforward a technical task as one might think. Even at the highest level, in a World Championship Match, Black has been able to save his skin. The stakes were very high, since this rapid game was played during the tiebreak ...


7

Of course, this should be a win. Here is how future GM Robert Cvek did it as a 2265-rated player starting at move 33. The position is not exactly the same, but it is pretty close. He struggled for a little bit in the beginning, but then, he managed to bring his king up using the bishops to block the rook checks as Initial Ignorance mentioned, and then it ...


7

I frequently face situations in the late middle game (perhaps only a one minor piece and a rook or two on each side, no queens) where I can force a position (via exchanges) where both players are materially equal but I have an isolated passed pawn on the 4th or 5th rank. I have heard that isolated pawns are bad (because they cannot be supported by other ...


7

There is no absolute result for this type of endgame-it all depends on the position of the pieces. In fact, any result is possible. Objectively, this particular position with black to move is a loss-you didn't make a mistake.I suggest you consult endgame tablebase, which announce a loss in 24 moves with best play by Black. Here is an example line. [FEN "8/...


6

After 5. Kc7 it is a draw, e.g [FEN "8/3n4/8/1P3k2/1P6/4K2P/8/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... Nb6 2. Kd4 Ke6 3. Kc5 Nd7+ 4. Kc6 Ne5+ 5. Kc7 Nd3 6. b6 Nb4


5

The key is to create weaknesses in Black's position, while also not exchanging off too much material. For example, if you exchanged down and got a K+B+B+h-pawn vs K+R, Black could sacrifice his rook for your dark-squared bishop, resulting in the wrong bishop drawn endgame. My strategy would be to fix Black's pawns on a certain colour complex, ideally ...


4

One attribute is generally an advantage and the other is a disadvantage. Isolated pawns are weaker than connected pawns because they cannot be supported by other pawns. Passed pawns are an advantage because of the threat to promote. When you combine the two, whether it is an advantage or disadvantage is dependent entirely on the position. You can have a ...


3

What I was taught was that a king and two connected passed pawns was "drawable" if the pawns were both on the SIXTH rank, with the pawnholder to move. Assuming that the two kings and rook were all in a position to support/oppose the pawns. If the pawn are both on the seventh rank, you might be able to win by "queening" one of them. Unless the opponent can ...


2

Read My System by Nimzowitch. You need to see examples where the isolated passed pawn is weak, and examples where it is strong. If your judgement on the matter can be consistently more accurate than that of your opponents, you will win a lot of games


2

Sure, it all depends. But usually the most important question is can the pawn be blockaded. For example you have isolated passed pawn on d4, Black puts N on d5 and laughs at you. To play against an isolated pawn, Nimzovitch said it best..First restrain, (get several pieces controlling the square in front of it),then blockade (put one of them on that square; ...


2

Why? Probably because of subjective pressure of the first game of World Championship match. From what I recall when watching this game - the commentators were also surprised that Gelfand offered/agreed to a draw. His advantage was also not only in the passed pawn (which could e either a strength or a weakness) but also in having two bishops.


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