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27

Stockfish evaluation is not the only criterion to determine whether a move is sound or not. The main issue with committing so early to 3.b3 (against this particular Black setup) is that there are no downsides to delaying that move. In other words, even if you want to play some setup with b3, there's no reason do it right now. Instead, other moves that ...


18

There are 3 main reasons for this move to be inaccurate. It doesn't place any pressure on black's position. It weakens c3, allowing black to "force" your knight to the more passive square d2. It removes the Qb3 move, which punishes the early development of black's LSB. All of these allows black to develop more easily and equalize.


10

One should be very careful with the win percentage parameter. Probably here b3 was mostly played by lower-rated players trying to avoid theoretical lines and confuse the higher-rated opponent. Another example of the same fallacy: I don't remember losing in the exchange french with black. Of course, it's not because 3. exd5 exd5 is so great for black, it was ...


7

First things first, I don't believe thinking in terms of computer evaluation is useful at all for humans. We don't look at a position and go "Well, I guess that's about a +0.54". Instead, I'd focus on the key elements of the position. By move 15, Black has a weak pawn on d6 that will probably stay weak for the entire game, while the d5 square is a ...


4

Although I in principle agree with other answers, I'd like to double down on one particular idea which did not work in your game. Clearly, after c5 you played Bg5 and Bxf6 to establish a knight on d5. This looks very reasonable. Yet, you first take on f6 and then play Nc3, allowing Bxc3 after which you have no knight left, and the weakness of the d5 square ...


4

Your idea was completely correct: Exchange on f6 and implant a monster on d5. Unfortunately, that knight only says "Boo." and doesn't guarantee you a quick win at all. And if you let Black trade it (you still could have played Re2 instead of Nc3, and try to play N-a3-c2-e3-d5, possibly prepared by g3 and f4 if the B tries to annoy you from g5), ...


4

1.g3 and 1.Nf3 are very similar moves and are extremely likely to transpose into each other. So the main answer to this is that people prefer the move order starting with 1.Nf3. One reason to prefer Nf3 is that it takes away the option of 1. ... e5, the other reason is that it's more flexible because you can choose whether to fianchetto the bishop or to ...


4

The first section of this answer is more subjective but I hope still insightful. The KID isn't necessarily the best choice for a must-win game but it is a good choice for a fighting game and for creating chances to win as black. This is because it often creates a game where White will need to make many difficult choices and there are chances for White to go ...


4

There are several top level games in this variation from the 1990's, including Yusapov-Kasparov, which Garry won; and some games where Karpov played it as White. You can explore the database further for examples. Typically, Black either pressures d4 more with c6 and Qb6, or he gets ready to give up the center (exd4) when he would play Nc5, a5, Re8 type of ...


3

Since you're asking about rather aggressive reply, the a6-Rb8-b5 variation might be of interest. In the other answer it's referred to as Gallagher; I have no clue who this Gallagher is, but the line is known as either Panno or Yugoslav variation (which might be odd since Panno has nothing to do with Yugoslavia). This line is recommended by Bologan, and ...


3

A good try for a dynamic game is 3.e3, against which Black has two main replies: 3...c5 and 3...Nc6. Against 3...c5 you could opt for either 4.exd4 or 4.b4, being a tempo up in the Modern Benoni or Blumenfeld gambit respectively. Both of these openings are known to be quite dynamic, so if you're ahead an extra tempo it can only help you. In the case of 3......


3

TL;DR: Yes, it is playable to leave the pawn hanging. In the event of it being captured, you will either regain it quickly, or enjoy strong compensation if Black hangs on to it. And if Black doesn't take on c4, then you will soon be protecting it in some fashion (or opting to exchange it). After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.g3 d5, I'd recommend playing 4.Bg2 before ...


3

OK, I disagree on two counts :-) First, I do think computer evaluations are useful, provided you use them sensibly and accurately. Sensibly: agonising over +0.54 for this move versus +0.61 for that move is pointless. But if the evaluation has gone from +2 to =0, that's a pretty significant change, and it's a clear sign that something went wrong between ...


2

I can't speak on the usefulness of ECO for serious study. However, I can tell you that https://www.openingtree.com/ (which is not a printed reference, but is relevant to the title) is much easier than a book to search: just play the moves, and the most common lines with white/draw/black percentages are displayed. You can search by Lichess players, chess.com ...


2

The difference is whose move defined the opening. If, after 1. e4, black responds with e6, the opening is defined as a French Defense. If, after 1. e4 e5, white plays Bc4, the opening is defined as the Bishop's Opening. However the most common openings, such as the Queen's Gambit, aren't considered either an opening or a defense. (Note: The Sicilian ...


2

Yes, it could be a standard setup, specially when your opponent let you grab huge space in the center, in general nothing is wrong with it, but if you want you can pay attention to some details like this: 1- it is important if you have moved your c-pawn or not, if yes, then as it's been told int may seem like KID set up( King Indian), in that case since ...


2

I don't know a specific name to it, but what concerns the downsides of this setup, I could think of two. Of course, it is very situational, but since in the example black opted for a kings-indian setup, it is that 1) the bishop on d3 is rarely useful against the fianchetto (pawn on g6 is well protected), and 2) it blocks the d-file which sometimes can lead ...


2

If you can en passant any enemy piece and the engine doesn't know about it, you don't need to trick Stockfish into bringing its queen out early. You can play almost any way you want and let the game come to you eventually. I guess a quick example can come from the Alekhine Defence. After 1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5, if I understood correctly you can put yourself a ...


2

The answer to your question may come from game statistics or knowledge of openings. With regard to statistics, the "universe" of games can generate different responses if they are Grandmasters, FIDE, international, national or amateur tournaments. The former have more in mind that the order of plays allows them to reach the position they want to ...


2

White has a development advantage with an extra piece in the field and therefore should be able to capture some type of initiative despite the symmetrical pawn structure. I suggest playing through some top games in the line to see how things play out.


2

Not really a pawn sacrifice, since you can retake your pawn with Qa4, but definitely a reasonable way to continue. 4.Bg2, with similar ideas, appears to be the more popular option according to databases though, but both moves will transpose into each other pretty much every time.


2

books: Nunn is a very good author. Maybe try something by J. Silman too, see if you like it. There are many books for beginners, you might need to spend time to find the one you like the most (always a good idea to check that the author is at least an IM though). I'd say opening prep is not very critical for you, just yet; most games will probably start ...


1

what is the best tradeoff between learning some lines really deep vs learning many variations but not as deep? There are several cut-offs you can use: Cut short the depth in a particular line when it becomes "calm". So, both sides have developed and there are no immediate tricky tactics. As a first cut on breadth, make sure you include critical ...


1

I don't know these books myself, but John Nunn is an excellent author and tactics are an important topic, you can't really go wrong with those. If you want some variation in your training, maybe now's the time to start with endgames. They may look boring (to most) at first glance, but if you dive deeper, you will notice more and more how rich and educative ...


1

White's position looks pretty active. It's basically a zero-risk opening that offers many chances to play for a win. For example, White can continue with a quick Nc3 (speculating with Nd5 ideas that will give the d8 bishop a hard time to join the game again), Be3 and 0-0-0


1

you mentioned the main ones, Alekhine is the good one, with Pirc and Modern also black let's white to over extent and hopes to attack it later, and some side-lines or Caro-Kann and French with Nc3, but the idea to rely on unsound opening is not advisable in general, it is better to learn some standard lines and get a playable position with chances for both ...


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