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18

The main function of a second is to provide timely analysis and advice to the principal player, both before and during the match. If the second is being pestered by the chess press because their identity is known then it becomes more difficult for them to do their job properly. It is an added unwanted distraction. Second, the second will have particular ...


13

5...Nxe4 leads to the Open Spanish. It's a respectable opening with some very long lines, as is typical of the Ruy Lopez. One thing it does not do though is win a pawn, because White can easily win it back after 6. Re1 (the main line is actually 6. d4 because Black cannot hold on to the pawn anyway). The knight is threatened and will eventually be forced to ...


8

White does not lose a pawn here as e4 was indirectly defended via castling. For example, after ...Nxe4 6. Re1 Nf6 white can take the e5 pawn to restore material balance.


6

6...Ne8 and 6...d5 are the main moves played followed by 6...Nh5 and 6...d6 The move ...h6 can seriously weaken the b1-h7 diagonal. Going down the main line might help explain what this Knight is doing on e8: 6...Ne8 7.e4 b6 8.Bd3 Ba6 9.Nh3 Nc6 10.0-0 Na5 11.Qe2 c5 12.e5 f6 From this diagram you can imagine if 6...h6 was played instead. Once White gets e4-...


5

If your search is still ongoing, I have a chess tree with all the openings for you. There is also printable pdf version on https://named-openings-galore.com/


4

William: (1) Taking is the Open Spanish, which is perfectly playable for Black. (2) But, as others have noted, Black doesn't keep the pawn. (3) If Black tries to keep the pawn, he can get himself into trouble along the e-file. A relevant game to look at is Fischer-Trifunovic 1961. Another is Daskalov-Belchev 1975. Be sure to look at them with an engine, so ...


3

According to Wikipedia, it is the Marshall defense, played by Frank Marshall in the 1920s, until he gave it up after losing to Alekhine in 1925 at Baden Baden.


3

I asked a GM and surmise the following answer. Basically all GMs have an "opening repertoire" which includes every opening. Some of them they'll know especially well, e.g. a player who specializes in the Alekhine's Defense will also know the opening to high depth, but even those who never play the Alekhine's Defense as Black will still know some ...


3

The score of openings is more often a combination of the strength of players which play it, the situations in which the openings are played, and of course the objective merit of the opening. Looking at the database you will often see sidelines which have much higher scores than mainlines, often these are trendy lines which are played by players who are up to ...


2

There is a poster on the /chess/ thread in 4chan.org/tg/ who started this opening and shilled it relentlessly. It's just one dude who has enough time to post about it constantly and pay streamers to play it lol. The guy who made it has even streamed on Twitch but I can't remember his username. There's nothing legitimate to it and the opening itself is a ...


2

I asked a GM and apparently the reason for top GMs not playing 1. g3 is because it's not as good as the main moves at pressing for an advantage. This is confirmed by the cloud analysis on Lichess: After 1. e4 White has an advantage of +0.3 After 1. d4 White has an advantage of +0.2 After 1. Nf3 White has an advantage of +0.2 After 1. c4 White has an ...


1

1. d4 d5 2. c4 form the start of the Queen's Gambit family of openings. Black's reply ...Nf6 is weak enough to possibly not deserve a name (at least none comes to mind at the moment). Black's typical reply is either ...e6, heading towards the Orthodox Queen's Gambit Declined family tree, ...c6 leading to the Slav tree, or ... dxc4 and the Queen's Gambit ...


1

The "Aged Gibbon Gambit" certainly deserves a mention here too. It occurs when g4 is played against Old Indian defense. [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.g4


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