Hot answers tagged

51

While it's not generally given as part of the explicit definition, the term "gambit" usually refers to an offer of material that can be accepted. If it can't be accepted, then it's a trap. You can look through chess traps and see that many of them involve apparently giving up material.


42

There is no need for an early queen trade. Just develop your pieces, if possible by attacking the queen. Here is an example from the Wayward Queen Attack also known as Patzer Opening. [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. Qf3 Nf6 5. Ne2 Bg7 6. Nbc3 O-O 7. d3 d6 2.Qh5 threatens to take e5, so we defend it by developing a piece: Nc6 (d6 is also possible)...


41

This calls for some scripting, so here's my first hasty attempt at it ;) Here's a quick way you can do the search on your own in python, using stockfish 10 and only the python-chess package. All open-source and free-software! Briefly, what the script will do: Consider all 960 positions, one at a time For each position, it scans over all legal white moves ...


39

Peter Svidler answered this in a recent video for Chess24: Why do the majority of GMs and almost all super-GMs play 1…e5 or 1…c5 in answer to 1.e4 rather than the French Defence (1…e6)? Peter: I think the answer is twofold. Firstly, both the Spanish and the Sicilian offer you a much broader scope to choose from. If you play 1…e5 you’re not ...


38

It was one game in online rapid. You cannot deduce from one game that 1.Nh3 is sound or not sound. Carlsen was actually MUCH worse out of the opening, and just outplayed Dreev later. It really means nothing other than Carlsen is currently much stronger. Most likely 1.Nh3 is not good, and this is unusual for a first move: Stockfish already evals this as -.62 ...


33

I believe your question essentially boils down to the topic of whether it is possible to completely "solve" chess. Wikipedia has an excellent article on the topic which should give you a good overview. To summarise, the number of possible game variations in chess is estimated to be 10^120. This is a staggeringly huge number, for comparison, consider that ...


33

Trying to encourage a queen trade in this sort of situation is usually the wrong strategy. The exaggerated version of the answer is this. Your opponent has just proved that they don't know how to use their queen properly. Instead of saying, "That's OK. I'll trade off the queens so this isn't a problem for you", you should say "I'll keep exploiting this ...


33

As Akavall said correctly, it is the Damiano Defense, and is named after Pedro Damiano (1480–1544). Since he answered the basic question about the name, I would not normally, but there is an additional part to the question, so I am going to add that 2...f6? is virtually a forced loss, no matter how you play it, and here is the analysis. So, no you cannot ...


31

In such a case, I would consider an editing blunder. Can you give the moves that lead to that position ? I would not be surprised, for instance, if the comment was written with respect to the same line where ...Bb7 is played instead of ...Bb6. r2qr1k1/1bp2pp1/p1n4p/1pbnp3/P7/1BPP1N2/1P3PPP/R1BQRNK1 w - - 0 14 In this position 14.axb5 leads to nothing but ...


27

Probably the most aggressive opening without being unplayable in chess is Double Muzio Gambit in King's Gambit, which suicide-bombs two minor pieces at f7 for a wildest possible opening attack: [FEN ""] [Title "Double Muzio Gambit"] 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O! {Strongest continuation, Muzio gambit! White sacrifices a piece for better ...


27

Sure black's a6-b5 come with tempo, but let's say at a very basic level, if you just compare pieces, structure and development progress, you can see that white is: Ready to castle whereas black hasn't yet developed either kingside pieces, so at least 2 tempi away from castling. This translates into white having a safer king 1-2 tempi earlier, which means ...


27

This is kind of out there (virtually nobody plays it as white and even fewer allow it as black) but there is a rather crazy queen sacrifice line in the Grand Prix: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 "] 1.e4 c5 2.f4 d5 3.Nf3 dxe4 4.Ng5 Nf6 5.Bc4 Bg4!? 6.Bxf7+ Kd7 7.Qxg4+ Nxg4 8.Be6+ Kc6 9.Bxg4 5...Bg4!? by black is quite rare and ...


27

There are no checkmates from 0-3 ply. 4 ply: 8 checkmates, 197,281 total nodes 5 ply: 347 checkmates, 4,865,609 total nodes 6 ply: 10,828 checkmates, 119,060,324 total nodes 7 ply: 435,767 checkmates, 3,195,901,860 total nodes 8 ply: 9,852,036 checkmates, 84,998,978,956 total nodes 9 ply: 400,191,963 checkmates, 2,439,530,234,167 total nodes "checkmates" ...


27

Stockfish evaluation is not the only criterion to determine whether a move is sound or not. The main issue with committing so early to 3.b3 (against this particular Black setup) is that there are no downsides to delaying that move. In other words, even if you want to play some setup with b3, there's no reason do it right now. Instead, other moves that ...


26

It would certainly allow for more attacks due to kings being stuck in the center, but fundamentally changing the game, which in a way dumbs it down, is not good. It would be less complex. I also do not want to think that I spent 40 years of my life studying something only to have it changed. I do not want the rug pulled out from under me like that.


25

My short answer: no, computers are not destroying chess. And now here comes a really long version ... Your first question: It is true the engines have level up the game, but can we also conclude that engines at a certain level are destroying the human cognitive process of figuring out moves by themselves over the board (mainly at opening phase)? As ...


25

The Bong-Cloud opening is a joke opening that is meant to give your opponent a chance, and also it is meant to show contempt for your opponent. You play it because you think you are much stronger than they are. It is, obviously, not a good opening. GM Hikaru Nakamura is one of the jokesters, who plays this from time to time. There are multiple YouTube videos ...


24

Good heavens. Play it! The Sicilian is not a defense for the lazy or defensive player - the Black side will need to be booked up, tactically sharp, and more than anything will need to understand why it works, and how to make it work. Regarding that GMs can't play it, that's nonsense. It's a deadly tool in their arsenal. This opening's hypermodern ideas ...


24

A commonly known knight sacrifice by white is the Fried Liver Attack: [FEN ""] [ECO "C57"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5?! (5... Na5 {The main line.} 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 {Black has compensation in form of initiative for the pawn.}) 6. Nxf7!? (6. d4 {The Lolli variation.}) Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6 8. Nc3 White has a strong attack against ...


24

"Reversed" Openings in general A black defense and its white mirror counterpart will often play out quite differently (compare the rather sharp Sicilian Defense and the rather quiet English Opening). The right to move matters, in both ways. By moving, you give away information to your opponent - the set of variations you can choose from shrinks with every ...


24

In short, after some investigation, I do not believe that white was a 2200 player is the real answer. First, I found it odd that it says he was exactly 2200. This is the only tournament I can find that he ever played, and it was an Olympiad, which had to be FIDE rated. He was also from Brazil, which was not a strong chess region in the world at that time. It ...


23

This question is a good first stop for students of the opening. Comparing the two: 1.e4 rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/4P3/8/PPPP1PPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq e3 0 1 Less influence over the centre: 1.e4 doesn't stop the freeing pawn moves 1...c5 (Sicilian Defence), 1...d5 (except at top level, Scandinavian Defence), 1...e5 or 1...f5 (was Black going to weaken his king ...


23

2018 update: It seems lichess.org offers a lot of the features you're looking for. On lichess, go to tools then choose Analysis board: The editor allows you to import FEN, PGN or edit the board yourself. You have access to two proper opening databases, one extracted from the games played on lichess and one from the masters games (top players). It's not ...


23

Why is the French defence not played at the highest level? If you consider any statistically small (~20) sample of chess players, regardless of standard, then you will get clustering of openings chosen. This has very little to do with soundness or otherwise and much to do with fashion and temperament. Just look at someone like Nakamura. So I wonder why ...


23

It's not a ridiculous question. Before discussing your precise example, let's cover some basic grounds: Purely from an optimal play perspective: having more space translates into having more activity and thus more options for your pieces, and that's really the key point here. The more space your pawn structure provides, the more maneuvering possibilities ...


23

The Cochrane Gambit: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nxf7 This is relatively sound gambit, Topalov has played it against Kramnik. The Traxler Gambit: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 Bc5 5. Nxf7 Bxf2 6. Kf1 Qe7 7. Nxh8 White does have an option of taking on f7 with the bishiop 5. Bxf7 which leads to only a pawn sacrifice and less ...


23

Well, I want to give you a third master's opinion, and most coaches teach the London because they can teach students an opening that the students can, for the most part, be mindless for the first 10 moves (d4,Nf3,Bf4,e3,Bd3,0-0,c3,Nbd2,Qe2,Re1, etc.) or so, against almost any black response. Of course, in chess you can never totally ignore what the opponent ...


22

At a basic level, what we want from an opening and a defense, is: we want to be fighting for the center squares (1), we're trying to develop our pieces and get good squares for them (2), and thirdly, we want to have a safe king (3). This is as modest a expectation as one can have for a good opening. Now roughly speaking, there are two types of defenses (say ...


22

Against 1.c4. This will allow white to exchange their c-pawn for black d-pawn and later gain a tempo. 2. cxd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3, or 2...Nf6 at some point will be followed with e4 with tempo. All in all, white can take control of the center. According to lichess' database 1.c4 d5 is very rarely played. However, the move is probably not losing; stockfish gives it: 0....


21

There is not opening that usually paves the way for a queen trade. There are plenty of specific lines that allow for it, but it takes cooperation from your opponent. The first line that comes to mind is hugely popular at the GM level: The Berlin in the Ruy Lopez. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible