7

I am asking because if I wanted to teach somebody openings, I should obviously just first teach them principles, but what about these opening traps? Exactly. There are many opening traps and if you don't know them they are very easy to fall into. For instance it is easy for a beginner playing the Ruy Lopez to fall for a trap which is so old it is called the ...


6

Adding to Philip's answer, I more remember it from the Scandinavian, because there the bQ gets out early anyway and it takes much less patzer moves to irreversibly trap it this way. Example: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qe5+ {or Qe6+, still 70 games up to here on Lichess} 4.Be2 Qf6? 5....


5

In my first 10 years of playing chess I never studied openings. I studied middle game, positional play, and endings. Falling for traps is a great way to learn about them, very memorable. I did play through many master games and so had a feel of openings from that. Against strong opposition I often ended up in cramped positions struggling for activity out ...


5

A configuration of pieces like this can occur in many Sicilian sidelines, or with colors reversed in the English. For example 1. e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.Nc3 Qb6 5.Nd5, or 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Bb4 3.Qb3 Nc6 4.g3 Nd4. I am not aware that it has a name, or is even of much importance. Although the Knight makes a slightly surprizing advance that seems to gain a ...


5

In online chess, this is commonly referred to as the 'Lefong' inspired by FM Lefong Hua of Canada. Here is a clip with Magnus referencing it.


4

Study Opening principles. At least get the basic foundation (first 5 moves ) of common openings. The biggest problem with opening tricks is that if you know how to counter them, you will have a decisive advantage. At the 1400 level, players will seldom do random gambits and openings. The most common you will see from white is Queen or King's gambit, evans ...


4

This is just a series of bad moves by black. The video linked to by koedem says it's a new "trap," and quite frankly, it requires white to resign after dropping the queen to qualify as a trap. If white continues 8. Nxc7+, when the dust settles, white still has a slight advantage, having traded a queen for a rook, two pawns and a bishop. (In this ...


4

Stockfish 10+ (depth 20) disagrees with the other answer, because it thinks that White's opening here is sound and evaluates the final position as +1.4. I would be very interested to see anyone play as Black starting from that position and beat Stockfish 10+. If nobody can, how can one consider White to have played badly?


4

As a practical matter, if you're playing to win, and you encounter a gambit you haven't seen before, don't take the material. Play defensively. This will be sub-optimal by engine standards, but will usually lead to a position that is easier to play. This is particularly true in your case, where you expect to outplay your lower rated opponent given enough ...


3

According to Wikipedia, it is the Marshall defense, played by Frank Marshall in the 1920s, until he gave it up after losing to Alekhine in 1925 at Baden Baden.


3

This youtube video on the Stafford gambit discusses possibilities after 5. e5 in some detail, and suggests your 5... Ne4 line, continuing with 7... f6. Your suggestion of 8. Nd2 certainly looks better than the next move considered there. Obviously if the main strength of an opening is that it produces traps then when your opponent knows how to avoid the ...


2

I think ! is far too generous for 8...Qh4?! worsening an already dubious line. 9. g3 Qf6 as you have then 10. Bf3! (10. f3?! objectively and ?? practically. Voluntary stripping the King before any piece coordination) bringing the light squares fully under control with a long term attack, able to retreat to g2, breaking the Black Queen's last hope of ...


2

one improvement could be on move 11. Rg1 rather than 11.f.g4, though they are both good, also on move 15. Na3 doesn't make sense, 15Bd4 with the idea of Qd3 is more playable, aslo g5 could be considered too, but I'd agree with the comments by Pablo, it is not worth your time and it is a dubious gambit, just play either Nc3 and get a playable game, there are ...


2

Just a side note. Because your opponent makes a non book move does not mean it can be punished. This was a big realization for me because I always wanted to punish non book moves. Especially, if you are playing Black. White has a wide range of moves to choose from. Some may give him a .25 advantage while another is only .10. It is clear that you cannot ...


2

I agree that AimChess is a paid service that seeks to give you customized answers using some fancy machine learning algorithms and normal engine play. However, I think you can recreate most of this yourself from some combination of openingtree.com, the default opening book, and lichess insights. Specifically, I'd first look at openingtree and your insights ...


2

Yes. Certainly. AimChess does exactly that. You may want to pay for it.


2

Sometimes violating opening principles is one's best way of playing for an advantage. Even if you are not the one playing for advantage, opponent might be. The first opening that comes to mind is the Two Knights Defense: [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 {Black's played completely ...


2

Well, study your opening more. At this level, your opponent isn't capable of creatively playing a new gambit. It's not hard to find some material of known gambits of your particular opening.


1

1. d4 d5 2. c4 form the start of the Queen's Gambit family of openings. Black's reply ...Nf6 is weak enough to possibly not deserve a name (at least none comes to mind at the moment). Black's typical reply is either ...e6, heading towards the Orthodox Queen's Gambit Declined family tree, ...c6 leading to the Slav tree, or ... dxc4 and the Queen's Gambit ...


1

From your post, I get the idea you might feel uncomfortable playing wild gambit positions. I would say: try to get a position you feel comfortable in. I feel most gambits your opponent will play, will be unsound, but then you will have to know some theory for that. Old benoni: just play 2.d5 and play on from there. The position will be quite closed and white ...


1

If you want to play a London System and avoid the Elephant gambit then start with 1. Nf3, and after 1... d5 2. d4 gets you into familiar lines.


1

I am sorry, but you can not create any novel chess opening traps because all were already discovered in a certain range of moves. Also, I want to mention @RemcoGerlich's comment that even if there was an undiscovered opening trap then a computer couldn't recognize that it is a trap. Instead, you could try to use an engine to look up moves that lose but are ...


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