18 votes

What to do when your opponent doesn't play along in the opening?

It sounds like you're a beginner. As such, you should be focusing more on tactics than openings. First, just because they play a move that's not in your book, doesn't mean it's "wrong". It may be an ...
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  • 3,924
14 votes

How should I play after, or refute, the Tennison Gambit?

It looks like your position fell apart pretty early on, a symptom of poor opening theory. Your King and Queen were exposed to attack within the first few moves, and White ruthlessly exploited that ...
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  • 1,659
13 votes
Accepted

Wrong lines of play to illuminate right lines

A healthy approach towards learning openings is to retain the key ideas involved, and not to necessarily memorise move by move unless it's an extremely precise sequence in a very theoretical line (as ...
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  • 11.8k
11 votes
Accepted

How do you get to this trap position?

Your proposal is a plausible way to get to that position. I wouldn't call the Scandinavian "bad" just because it moves a piece twice. It's perfectly playable. When the trap was played in the ...
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  • 15.2k
11 votes

Tricky continuation to the Fried Liver "refuted"

I mean, this is the main line and for a reason. But I would be very surprised if most people's repertoire ended here, this is where it begins. The line goes 6.Bb5+ c6 7.dxc6 bxc6 And now White has a ...
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  • 2,530
10 votes

What to do when your opponent doesn't play along in the opening?

Is it best for me to stop and eat clock time figuring out why the wrong move is wrong? No, you should learn before the match what the responses to deviations are. If you don't know why deviations are ...
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10 votes
Accepted

Does this trap have a name?

The pattern starting from Nxf7 does not correspond to any known (opening) trap. It's to be expected as this does not really qualify as a trap for the following reasons: The path up to the critical ...
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  • 11.8k
10 votes

Simplest plan to stop my queen from getting trapped

I don't think that this is an easy win at all. In fact it is not clear who is the trapper and who is the "trappee". To close the trap, White has no need even to develop. He can simply play ...
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  • 7,468
9 votes
Accepted

How can you deal with gambits/traps opening, assuming you don't know the theory of the opening yet?

There are two approaches, accept the gambit or decline the gambit. Accept the gambit. Follow the usual best practices for calculating paying special attention to safety checks. Decline the gambit. ...
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  • 3,868
8 votes

Is this knight sacrifice a good idea?

The sacrifice is quite dubious. Besides the answers with 10.Nxe5, 10. Rxe5 is simply two knights for a rook and there is no attack for Black.
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  • 6,081
8 votes
Accepted

What to do when your opponent doesn't play along in the opening?

Nothing is ever certain, but when you are in position that was played in thousand of high class games, any deviation is virtually always dubious move. On the other hand in position which was played in ...
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  • 3,256
8 votes
Accepted

Traps in the Owen's opening

[fen "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 "] 1. e4 b6 2. d4 Bb7 3. Bd3 f5 4. exf5 Bxg2 5. Qh5+ g6 6. fxg6 Nf6 7. gxh7+ Nxh5 8. Bg6++ One possible trap for black is in the ...
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  • 762
7 votes

Wrong lines of play to illuminate right lines

In essence this is why databases are used. No book has room for such data. Basically if someone leaves your preparation, you need to pause and ask "what is wrong with that move", or when studying ...
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  • 6,081
7 votes

Can a beginner's "opening repertoire" consist of only "opening principles"?

I am asking because if I wanted to teach somebody openings, I should obviously just first teach them principles, but what about these opening traps? Exactly. There are many opening traps and if you ...
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  • 75.7k
6 votes
Accepted

How should I play after, or refute, the Tennison Gambit?

There is a saying that "the best way to refute a gambit is to accept it", attributed to Steinitz. While sayings in chess often have exceptions, I think it does apply to this particular case. If you go ...
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  • 10.2k
6 votes

How do you get to this trap position?

The initial way you gave is the overwhelming favorite way to get to that in the Mega Database. Out of the 72 games, that move order occurred 59 times (three times, white played Nf3, and only after did ...
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  • 31.9k
6 votes

Which opening contains this trap?

Adding to Philip's answer, I more remember it from the Scandinavian, because there the bQ gets out early anyway and it takes much less patzer moves to irreversibly trap it this way. Example: [FEN &...
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5 votes

Is this knight sacrifice a good idea?

This is really a question for the engines, but it's hard to believe that Black has enough compensation here for his creatively sacrificed material. White could also return a fraction of the material ...
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5 votes

Traps in the Owen's opening

Owen's Defense is a bit passive, but quite solid opening, so there aren't that many traps to watch out for. Here is a primitive one: [FEN ""] [Title "Owen's Defense"] [Startply "5"] 1. e4 b6 2. Nf3 ...
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5 votes

What to do when your opponent doesn't play along in the opening?

Just a side note. Because your opponent makes a non book move does not mean it can be punished. This was a big realization for me because I always wanted to punish non book moves. Especially, if you ...
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  • 149
5 votes
Accepted

Is there a name for this common online trap in the Modern Defence?

In online chess, this is commonly referred to as the 'Lefong' inspired by FM Lefong Hua of Canada. Here is a clip with Magnus referencing it.
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  • 165
5 votes

Can a beginner's "opening repertoire" consist of only "opening principles"?

In my first 10 years of playing chess I never studied openings. I studied middle game, positional play, and endings. Falling for traps is a great way to learn about them, very memorable. I did play ...
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  • 3,868
5 votes

Which opening contains this trap?

A configuration of pieces like this can occur in many Sicilian sidelines, or with colors reversed in the English. For example 1. e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.Nc3 Qb6 5.Nd5, or 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Bb4 3.Qb3 ...
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  • 7,468
4 votes

What to do when your opponent doesn't play along in the opening?

Because it is a game and a contest/struggle. The opponent makes moves that are good for him not the moves in the favorite line you memorized. Stop figuring out why his move is 'wrong' and figure out ...
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4 votes

How do you get to this trap position?

[FEN ""] 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qd8 Above is a playable line of the Scandinavian defense. 3...Qa5 and maybe also 3...Qd6 are more popular, but Qd8 isn't horrible. The tactical trick itself is ...
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4 votes

Poor gambit for white

I'm an FM so I guess I'm experienced. For Black's POV, the 12...e6 variation you gave is the best way to play. It pretty much stops White's attack and Black's just up a piece. If he really wanted to ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Tricky continuation to the Fried Liver "refuted"

I believe you should go for 9.h4 in the main line: [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5 d5 5.exd5 Na5 6.Bb5+ c6 7.dxc6 bxc6 8.Bd3 Nd5 9.h4 White is trying to keep his pieces on ...
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4 votes

What is this opening trap I keep encountering in the Englund Gambit?

This is just a series of bad moves by black. The video linked to by koedem says it's a new "trap," and quite frankly, it requires white to resign after dropping the queen to qualify as a ...
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