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9

I see a couple of reasons not to do this: It's a lot harder to distinguish the pieces. For example, bishops and pawns look really similar, and the black queen and king look similar too. When you watch a game as an on-site spectator, you don't view it top-down either. Even better: the players themselves don't view the board top-down, but from an angle. Video ...


5

You can do this For free at https://lichess.org. Go to the "Play" tab, and select "Tournaments." Assuming that you have a lichess account, (all they need for that is your e-mail, and they do not spam it) you will see an option to create a tournament. Once you select that option, you will be able to specify the start position in the tournament (this ...


4

Lichess has everything you need. Free and open source. It's the second or third popular website after chess.com (possibly chess24 not sure). Many strong players. No installation as it’s a web app.


3

I would suggest going to lichess.org and creating one or more studies for this. You can choose to make these public or private or only visible to those you give the link to. Within a study, you can upload the PGN of your games as separate chapters. You will need an account to make studies, but creating an account and using any of the study features is ...


2

I used http://www.pychess.org/download/ and https://sourceforge.net/projects/scidvspc/. Linux chess applications are generally free and open source.


2

The puzzle here offers a light-weight alternative, Apronus. It's quite simple: paste the PGN, click the 'Absorb' button and then 'Link to share'.


1

There are four major ways people learn-reading books , doing it for practice, hearing it explained, or watching demonstrations Not everybody learns best with the same approach. The answer is that it depends. People can choose what method works best for them.


1

You can play correspondence chess (and I believe set up tournaments) on chess.com. While the site is free, paid members do get more features. I'm not sure if any of these features would be relevant to a correspondence tournament though.


1

You may want to use the echecsemail website. You can create round-robin tournaments for up to 9 players. For bigger player-pools, you'll have to split them in groups (or maybe talk to the admins). They also offer the possibility of choosing an alternative starting position (for opening practice purposes mainly) I hope those kids speak French, though!


1

When you play in a tournament (especially a FIDE rated one) and submit a carbon copy of your notation, that's how the game can end up in some database (such as chess-db). Chess players wouldn't be allowed to upload whatever they want to well known database sites since then they could deliberately mislead people who look them up to prepare for them. You can ...


1

If all you want to do is share your games with others via the internet then the easiest way is to create your own database of your games and upload the file to your cloud storage area, be it Dropbox, Google Drive or Microsoft One Drive. Then you can share read-only links to the file. This is the only free method of doing this that I know. If you are ...


1

Using theory sources like books just saves you having to do the theoretical research yourself. So it'll help you win more correspondence games, but not necessarily improve your skills. On the one hand, using theory books teaches you what high-quality opening play looks like. On the other hand, you're not really thinking yourself. I would recommend spending ...


1

What you get from the books/databases during your correspondece games is the same as what you get when you read them generally. You can make use of Opening lines, which become more important as the games get slower and slower Tactics, which you may encounter during your games Positional concepts and maneuvers, which play the most important part of a ...


1

I find that https://365chess.com has an AMAZING range of games - it's the only place I've been able to find some really old games. For basic analysis, I use the https://lichess.org analysis board because the overall experience on the site is so great. Seriously. It's amazing.


1

The project https://github.com/noobpwnftw/chessdb provides an API for getting engine evaluations including also the PV, with the FEN of a position as input. E.g., try an example from the readme: https://www.chessdb.cn/cdb.php?action=querypv&board=rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR%20w%20KQkq%20-%200%201&json=1 The response I got is: {"...


1

It is pointless to have a rest API for random position evals which have to be precomputed for near-instant response. In that case you might as well ask for an opening book. There are a few sites that with opening book querying tools, which are pretty close.


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