51

It is not a question of ethics, but more about being courteous. Chess is a game where it is impossible to separate the joy of the game from the competitiveness/ego aspect so by declaring a forced win in N moves, you are effectively asking your opponent to resign immediately even though he hasn't seen the forced win yet owing to his lesser faculties/skill ...


48

Is it rude to ask my opponent to resign an online game when they have a lost endgame? Yes, it is rude, although you are in good company. In one Olympiad Victor Korchnoi is alleged to have asked his opponent - "Do you speak English?" When they said "Yes" he replied "Then please resign". I may be misquoting. He may not have said "please" :-) Strictly ...


47

Assuming you also have plenty of time on your clock, make a break: have a drink, or check your mail, or pay a visit to the bathroom, or grab a book (even if it's an openings book, it doesn't count at cheating in that position ;) ), or go verify if your baby hasn't hurt herself with that knife she was trying to grab when you were too busy calculating your ...


35

I think the reason becomes more apparent when you consider why the rule is in place for OTB games - an opponent constantly moving their hands around the board and moving the pieces around can be very distracting while the other player is likely still trying to concentrate on the position. By contrast, in online chess both players are using their own ...


35

The behavior you describe is bad sportsmanship and goes against the policies of chess.com. See the chess.com fair play policy and this blog post about the new abuse report system which includes an option specifically for "poor sportsmanship / stalling in games".


34

This is actually a very complex question, and not one which has been solved in a satisfying way, to my knowledge. Essentially, we're asking for an algorithm to perform a kind of reverse Turing-test, to differentiate between human players and computers. First, client-side checks will always have weaknesses, unless you are in complete control of the client ...


34

Brian Towers answered the question, but to help you understand why people don't resign, I recommend you watch this lecture by GM Finegold Blunders, with GM Ben Finegold. The gist of it is: Never resign, and look for resources no matter how bad your position is. And when you are winning, don't let your guard down.


33

Chess.com's site rules have the following to say: You can NEVER use chess programs (Chessmaster, Fritz, etc) to analyze current ongoing games unless specifically permitted (such as a computer tournament, etc). The only type of computer assistance allowed is games databases for opening lines in Turn-based Chess and Vote Chess. [...] So it boils down to ...


30

That's called a mouse-slip, and it's part of playing online. Watch some of Carlsen's online play (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJlOlufG-JM) and you'll see even he mouse-slips on occasion. Common etiquette seems to be to continue playing out the game and try to be more precise next time.


30

It's always rude to ask your opponent to resign. They should resign of their own accord once they're convinced that you're overwhelmingly likely to win the game. In my case, that always meant you'd have to convince me that you knew how to play the endgame in question and that both of us knew how you would win it. If your opponent hasn't resigned yet, it ...


27

The majority of the users find that insulting. Is it really insulting to [...] I can answer the question based on this excerpt alone. The answer is yes.


27

I agree that it would break the FIDE rules against note taking, but this is not a FIDE tournament; it is online blitz on Lichess, so FIDE rules need not apply. You'd have to look at the Lichess terms of service instead. They say Cheating. We define this as using any external assistance to strengthen your knowledge and, or, calculation ability to gain ...


25

How could you cheat? This is what the Lichess terms of service say about it: Cheating. We define this as using any external assistance to strengthen your knowledge and, or, calculation ability to gain an unfair advantage over your opponent. Some examples would include computer engine assistance, opening books (except for correspondence games), ...


24

Chess.com has become a hot spot, with live and correspondence chess, along with tactical problems, articles, etc. The live chess is OK, but not the best. ICC or playchess are the best for live chess, FICS if you want free, but it doesn't have as many titled players or features. Those sites will also have video's, live commentary of top level tournaments, ...


22

Imagine a variation of chess without the rules about check and checkmate, where a player wins simply when he captures his opponent's king. In this variation, Kxd5 loses the game to exd5. Turns out, that's more or less how real chess works. The objective is to capture the opponent's king. If your king is under attack, you must deal with that threat. If there'...


21

In blitz, you can tell by how much time they're using. People using engines use a consistent amount of time for every move, instead of blitzing through the opening and slowing down to a crawl in the middlegame like most normal players. In particular, they can't play the opening fast, because they have to update their computer board after every opening move....


21

Yes, resigning a clearly lost game is indeed considered good behaviour. Sometimes not resigning is considered unsportsmanlike! It makes no difference on the result of the game whether you resign, are checkmated, or lose on time - a loss is a loss. In any rating system I've ever heard of, the method of losing doesn't make a difference. It's just that people ...


21

Honestly it's rude to ask your opponent to resign in any position. The one exception may be them deliberately letting their clock run to 0 in a completely lost position, but in this case they're being deliberately malicious and you can't really hope to reason with them. Even though you're absolutely justified in thinking your opponent should resign, that ...


20

Most chess sites use some variant of the Elo rating system If you have a much higher rating than your opponent, the expectation is that you will win. So if you do win, then we haven't gained that much information, so the change in rating for both you and your opponent will be small. If your opponent wins, there will be a much larger change in rating as ...


19

The Encyclopedia of Chess Openings (or ECO) is a classification system for the opening moves in chess. Instead of the traditional names for the openings, ECO has developed a coding system that has also been adopted by other chess publications. There are five main categories, "A" to "E", each of which is divided into 100 subcategories. Here is more info and ...


18

If we remove the component of flawed, human players from the equation and consider just the game of chess itself as it is spelled out by the rules, then chess is purely a game of skill with no room for chance. That is, it is in principle possible for there to be a perfect chess player that plays optimally against every possible move sequence by an opponent, ...


18

I followed @itub's suggestion and filed a report against the particular user. Here's the answer I got from Chess.com support: [...] Certainly, this is not what we want on our site! I have sent this member to our investigative department for a close watch on this account. They will be monitored and if they continue this behavior, we will have to ...


18

In general, less common openings tend to give weaker opponents issues, since they have yet to properly grasp many fundamental ideas of opening play and middlegame strategy, and if they don't know the concrete lines they may very well end up completely lost from a nonstandard opening position. But a nonstandard opening doesn't make you into a stronger player ...


17

Those are just the rules of the game. You could absolutely try to make the case that moving into check in such a situation should be legal, but playing by those rules wouldn't be chess anymore (it would be some variant). You could also ask why stalemate is a draw and not a win, even though the latter result would make more sense in a real battle. These are ...


17

I will answer from a different perspective: why Racing Kings (RK) has a rule to allow black a chance to draw, and why the same logic doesn't apply to chess. What is Racing Kings (RK)? Background for those unfamiliar with RK: Both sides start with all pieces (no pawns), arranged on the first 2 ranks of the chessboard, white on the right, black on the left. ...


16

Number of screen switches and speed of play are meaningless. If you use these to complain to the organizers of an online chess playing website they will laugh at you. There are two ways to tell if someone is cheating. The first is the "smoking gun". Consider this game section - [White "Allwermann,Clemens (1900) "] [Black "Kalinitschev,Sergey (2505) ...


16

Well, simply put, they chose to follow the USCF "Article 14: The Drawn Game rule 14E: Insufficient material to win on time, 14E3: King and two knights." While it is not a forced mate, there is a mating position that is possible, thus they could have easily followed the FIDE rule, and allowed the side with the knights to continue playing. It was probably a ...


15

It was my pleasure and recognition to see somebody asking to recommend some books how to play with BLACK. They were suggesting 3 books. All of them happened to be mine: Black is OK! (1988), Black is still OK! Black is OK forever! It shows the good taste of the members... Gratefully I draw your attention to some more. Winning with the Gruenfeld (Batsford,...


15

There is a rules in chess called Threefold repetition rule. This rule states that you can claim a draw if you are about to repeat the the position for a third time. This subsumes a situation called perpetual check which also leads to a draw. So what you did in your game wasn't a case of extortion or abusing a flaw in the game - it was completely by the ...


14

I would say this is not only insulting but unethical. Chess is a game that is intended to be a test of thought and concentration. It is unfair for a player to disrupt his opponents thought processes by drawing attention to any particular line of play as it may distract him from pursuing his intended strategy. Now you may think that the play is forced from ...


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