21

Some things that have helped me get better are: Counter-intuitively, continue to work hard on your slow game. The best speed game players in the world just happen to be the best slow game players. When playing slow games, you are giving your brain more "soak time" to absorb patterns and really grind into positions, giving your analysis ("I takes, he takes, ...


18

They may have made a fatal mistake and think that in another game they can win. It happens sometimes. You could make a mistake, or miss a mating pattern, and suddenly you've lost the game although you thought you were in the lead. In this case, many people may ask for a rematch because they think that they should have won and want to redeem themselves. If ...


11

Blitz is a bit of a different chess "animal". In order to play blitz well, you need a few things, and that is great tactical vision, good time management, and some positional skill so you can make decent moves quickly in quieter positions. It also helps to be young because you think faster when you are young. The first part to getting better is obvious, and ...


10

The king does not cross b1 (only the rook does). It also does not end up standing on b1 following the castling. Hence, the quoted rule is not violated.


9

If the enemy king is cut off at the edge of the board, it is possible to mate him using only premoves. For example: [StartPly "1"] [FEN "2k5/Q7/8/8/8/8/8/K7 w - - 0 1"] 1.Ka2 Kd8 2.Ka3 Kc8 3.Ka4 Kd8 4.Ka5 Kc8 5.Ka6 Kd8 6.Qb7 Ke8 7.Kb6 Kd8 8.Qc7+ Ke8 9.Kc6 Kf8 10.Qd7 Kg8 11.Kd6 Kf8 12.Qe7+ Kg8 13.Ke6 Kh8 14.Kf6 (14.Qf7??=) Kg8 15.Qg7# Just make sure ...


8

In some special cases you can "premove" to a forced mate even against a King in the center: 8/8/8/8/3k4/7Q/3K4/8 w - - 0 0 1. Qe6! Kc5 2. Kc3! Kb5 3. Qd6! Ka5 4. Qb4+ Ka6 5. Kc4 Ka7 6. Qb5 Ka8 7. Kc5 Ka7 8.Kc6 Ka8 9. Qb7# (Black's only option is 3...Ka4 when 4 Qb4 is already mate. The alternative 1 Qf5!? Kc4 2 Qe5 Kb4(b3) 3 Qd5(+) or 3 Qc3+ might not be ...


8

I think with the black king on f7 it's also possible. For example, in the following position: [FEN "8/5k2/3Q4/8/8/3K4/8/8 w - - 0 1"] this sequence of moves for white checkmates always: Ke4 Kf5 (go to f5 in two moves) Qd7 Kf6 Qh3 Qc8 Qa8 Qh1# I made this gif to explain why: In green it is shown where the black king could be (to consider all possibilities)...


7

Concerning the last question, no, you will not run out of opponents. I've been playing on chess.com for about seven years, and when I play blitz I'm almost exclusively interested in having a bit of fun. If you have ever had a small match of a few games against someone online, you quickly realize that many of the games resemble a lot since it is common to ...


7

I am an active member on online chess server http://www.chessfriends.com. I played there more than 5800 games. My stats as white are exactly same as black. I prefer playing 1 minute games, but sometimes I play 3 minute or 5 minute games. My experience is, that playing bullet or blitz games improve my tactics skills a lot. I have 2300 Fide rating, and I am ...


6

Know your openings! You didn't mention time control, but it doesn't matter, you just may not allow yourself to waste precious time on opening. Avoid sharp, theoretical lines if you can not memorize them fully. I usually avoid such openings because if you face a novelty/variation you haven't seen so far, there goes precious time on thinking for a move that ...


6

In bullet chess (1 min or less), you basically don't have time for thinking and will pre-move or make moves instantaneously often making assumptions about your opponent's moves. In such situation playing the best moves becomes less important; basically you just need to move fast without blundering too much. Playing chess at such short times becomes more ...


6

I am not an expert, but I would say blitz is 'art' part of chess. It requires a few skills to be good. Time management is obviously very important as there is not much time in a blitz game. I have few tips about time management, and you should know that most important ones are not to waste so much time in opening, not to waste too much time in forced moves ...


5

Just to show it's possible, here is a position, without the opponent king trapped at the edge of the board, where you can premove the entire sequence. [FEN "8/6k1/4Q3/8/8/8/8/K7 w - - 0 1"] Move the king to g5, play Qd7(+), and then continue as in Maxwell86's answer.


5

In online chess, this is commonly referred to as the 'Lefong' inspired by FM Lefong Hua of Canada. Here is a clip with Magnus referencing it.


4

To add something else to the other answers: I almost always offer a rematch and almost always accept a rematch but I sometimes need to run away to the toilet or to talk to someone at home or whatever else that needs attention. It is absurd to expect the readiness to accept any rematch.


4

My recommendation would be to join your local USCF club and play blitz there. Learn to use the clock, learn etiquette, learn your weaknesses, get tips from better players. I'm not sure you have to record your moves in blitz. Above all, have fun.


4

My first thought was that black had won a piece by move 12, and should have been able to win without getting into such heavy complications. For instance, a move like 15...Qc7? is just a bad move from a strategic standpoint. It's not necessarily losing or anything, but black doesn't know for sure where the queen is supposed to go, whereas black knows for sure ...


4

Was it smart of me to accept it since he was up by +1 and he only had 40 seconds left The final position was a dead draw, so there was nothing wrong taking the draw offer. However, you would probably win the game by time if you had continue (assuming you had more than 40 seconds on the clock and no increment). Moved your king aimlessly, and pushed for h5-h4 ...


3

In this case, I will have to quote from the FICS FAQ (http://www.freechess.org/Help/HelpFiles/fics_faq.html): 39.My rating is over/under inflated. Don't worry! Ratings are all relative anyway, not absolute. Compare your FICS rating only to other FICS players, not to ratings from other groups. Comparing your rating on FICS to a person's ...


3

This seems to be a 2 in 1 question. How do you (prepare) perform well in a (FIDE) rated blitz tournament? Will there be a difference between online blitz and over the board blitz? In general, blitz is compared to games with a longer time control. With this view in mind, blitz games are a lot about having a good control over the time left on your clock. ...


3

I read this question the other day, and as a habitual drag-drop player (in spite of already knowing that click-click would at least be more precise) I couldn't really give a convincing answer why I do it. I was playing some chess just now, however, and noticed one thing that does separate the two. Similar to what I mentioned in this answer, when using the ...


3

Is there any research/poll that supports your claim for drag&drop being more common choice? Personally, I use click-click, and most people I know also prefer this option. It's just as fast as drag&drop and it's much less prone to slip, as you already stated. And that's especially true when using smartphone instead of the mouse. :) Perhaps, apart ...


3

The first step would be to go over the rules for blitz play in FIDE, this is online at: http://www.fide.com/component/handbook/?id=125&view=article If you have no experience with a physical chess clock, I would recommend practicing with one before the event. You want the action of making a move and pressing the clock automatic, forgetting to stop your ...


3

Almost always the 30 move option is better. There are 2 key reasons: - You only lose 0.1 seconds per premove (on most servers), compared to 0.5 - 1.0 seconds. - Your opponent loses more time since you limit their thinking period by moving instantly. In my opinion, this is the primary reason why a situation like K+R vs K largely favors the K+R player ...


3

There are multiple factors involved. To improve blitz you must first improve your regular chess. Clock management. You must make every move at the rate necessary to finish the game without flagging and never take more time for any move that that average. Learn to move at your time quota and not faster nor slower. Your brain. It has a maximum speed ...


2

There are plenty of openings you could use in blitz, but I think the slow solid and positional openings need more thinking, thus you could lose. I would suggest playing like Mikhail Tal. That is, make sacrifices without calculating the move too much, and try to complicate the position for your opponent. I have used this in many of my games. Complicating the ...


2

On the playchess server you can list all the games being currently played. The most matches played are always the 3|0 ones, followed by 5|0, 1|0, 4|0, 3|2, 5|2 (dunno the exact order).


2

GameKnot GameKnot's live chess uses time control ranges for matchmaking, so there's no single default. I've bolded the time controls that fall within the default matchmaking window below. Available Time Controls (Minutes | Increment in Seconds): 3|0 5|0 10|0 3|3 3|5 3|10 5|10 5|15 5|20 10|20 10|30 10|60 I don't know of any non-experimental way to get ...


2

What defines, "standard time controls"? Do you want the most commonly played time controls? Do you want the time controls which are suggested per each server? To me, a more interesting analysis is to plot the percentage of games played vs time control and find the time controls with the largest spikes (popularity). But, I'm not sure how to get that ...


2

There are tons of first 4 moves that involve ridiculously unsound sacrifices, but most of these usually involve Bxf7+ and have no place in opening theory. These 'openings' are largely based on a gross overvaluation of castling rights: you can just slowly castle by hand, especially since the attacker usually has no other pieces developed yet (e.g. after 1.e4 ...


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