26

I would read it as "Pawn takes something on a1 and promotes to a Queen". Strictly according to the Laws of Chess the = sign should not be there (see article C.11). C.11 In the case of the promotion of a pawn, the actual pawn move is indicated, followed immediately by the abbreviation of the new piece. Examples: d8Q, exf8N, b1B, g1R. However this is a ...


22

What does “+-” mean in algebraic notation? This symbol means "White has decisive advantage", which means that White's advantage is big enough to secure him victory. As for symbol -+ it means "Black has decisive advantage". What does this notation mean? This notation is introduced to bypass the language barrier so any reader ( Japanese, English, Arabian, ...


22

Would it be sufficient here to write Ne4+ (meaning Nce4) only (i.e. without the "c" but with "+"), as Nfe4 would not be check? It depends on exactly what you mean by "sufficient". By "normal" definitions of "sufficient" the answer is obviously "yes". "Ne4+" disambiguates and leaves the human reader in no doubt which knight was moved. However it doesn't ...


18

The FIDE Laws of Chess 2018 are unambiguous: you should write Nce4, and the + sign is optional and not disambiguating. Ne4+ is not sufficient. Appendix C (algebraic notation), article C.10 basically tells you to write Nce4 to distinguish it from Nfe4. It does not mention check or other ways to disambiguate. Article C.13 notes that writing "+" to indicate ...


13

If you have two rooks, standing on different files (one of them on the d-file), that could capture on d2, then Rdxd2 is the correct notation. If you have two rooks on the d-file, and both can take on d2, then use the rank number to disambiguate, for instance R1xd2. This is according to the Algebraic System required by FIDE's Laws of Chess (see appendix C, ...


13

Your two knights are on d2 and f2. Ndxe4, Nfxe4, Your two knights are on f2 and f6. N2xe4, N6xe4 Your three knights are on d2, f2 and f6 (you promoted a pawn) Ndxe4, Nf2xe4, N6xe4


12

Though the previous answers have made some solid points, I think they have not yet given the main reason why algebraic notation has generally come to be preferred over descriptive notation: it is more absolute, less relative, than descriptive notation. What I mean is just this: in algebraic notation each square on the chessboard receives only one name, while ...


12

The two forms of notation you are referring to are called Descriptive Notation and Algebraic Notation respectively. Descriptive notation was the most used form from recent antiquity up until about 1970 in English speaking countries. Algebraic notation has been around since the 19th century, but didn't rise to its current prominence until the 20th century. ...


11

It hasn't always been so, but these days (at least according to FIDE rules) it's illegal to write your move down before making it, outside of some situations in which a draw is being claimed or the game is being adjourned. Here are the exact details as to when a move should be recorded (with the most relevant part italicized): 8.1. In the course of play ...


11

The castling notation was invented by Johann Allgaier and used for the first time in his 1811 2nd edition of his Neue theoretisch-praktische Anweisung zum Schachspiel. He didn't explain why he came up with it. Allgaier (and algebraic notation in general) used digit-0. The use of letter-O is an anglo-saxon oddity.


10

From the specification: A basic SAN [Standard Algebraic Notation] move is given by listing the moving piece letter (omitted for pawns) followed by the destination square. Capture moves are denoted by the lower case letter "x" immediately prior to the destination square; pawn captures the file letter of the originating square of the capturing pawn ...


10

That's descriptive notation. Click that to go to the wiki page. It is an obsolete notation, having been replaced by algebraic or figurine algebraic notation. B x KP means, Bishop (B) takes (x) Kings (K) Pawn (P). Q-R5 - Queen (Q) Moves To (-) Rook's (R) Fifth square (5) Then there are ways to show castling, etc. EDIT - doubled pawns. Descriptive ...


10

Can anyone please explain to me what these symbols mean? These are the abbreviations for the pieces in Dutch. I believe they are almost the same as the German ones (with the exception of the knight = Springer (jumper) in German and = paard (horse) in Dutch (Pferd = horse in German), which are - T = Turm (= Castle, Rook) P = Pferd (= Horse, Knight) L = ...


9

Anything less than or equal to G/29 does not require you to record moves, according to USCF. Otherwise known as Blitz and Quick, they have a separate rating for those time controls. Reference: An Introduction to USCF-Rated Tournaments [PDF] So, yes, you do need to record your moves in a G/30, because that is considered Standard time control. There is a ...


9

I can think of several reasons: The players will want to know how many moves have been played in the game (as you often get extra time after moves 40 and 60), how many moves have been played before the last pawn move or capture etc. Currently the players may not consult any other material than the score sheets during a game, but even if the rule was changed,...


9

Well, it isn't legal for two reasons, One, lets say that the opponent gave you an handshake. That would mean that the recorded moves are null, and it may cause some troubles with the arbiters. Two, Article 8.1: In the course of play each player is required to record his own moves and those of his opponent in the correct manner, move after move, as ...


8

While it's not ambiguous (only Nfe3 is legal), it is better to be specific with Nfe3. Successful software can deal with both Ne3 and Nfe3, but not every pgn parser is perfect, and some beginners will appreciate the additional guidance.


8

From the PGN specification (http://www6.chessclub.com/help/PGN-spec): Neither the appearance nor the absence of either a check or checkmating indicator is used for disambiguation purposes. This means that if two (or more) pieces of the same type can move to the same square the differences in checking status of the moves does not allieviate the ...


7

According to the online manual for the app, After each engine's move, the output [d/s]eval indicates a search depth d, a selective search depth s, and an evaluation in centipawns eval from white's perspective. For instance, the output [4/8]-103 indicates that the engine searched 4 plies ahead, with some variations even 8 plies ahead, and thinks that black ...


7

AFAIK, Edward Lasker (not Emmanuel) Lasker was the only master player resident in the USA to publish in Algebraic before the 1970s, substituting English initials for the German he would have used before immigrating. Not only are Bobby Fischer's books in Descriptive, so are his scoresheets. I don't know about 18th Century usage, but I have read 19th Century ...


7

I have a scoresheet I created for my own use here: https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B4uNw3C8V0SDZjZneGVUVTVaNlU/edit?usp=sharing I have pdf versions in various colors and the MS Publisher file I used to create it. So if you have MS Publisher you can modify it. The readme.txt file in that folder has descriptions of the files.


7

I think that improving your analysis and visualization skills is very important. I posted a question on this topic recently as well (How can one improve their over-the-board analysis skills?). But your question is more specific and I think you need to NOT try and study the Reassess Your Chess book in your head. The material he covers is too complex to be ...


7

In order, 1) Not to my knowledge 2) Not to my knowledge 3) There are several things that make this sort of project non-trivial, even difficult. Not the least of which is following the piece, differentiating it from a hand gesture, for example. Also determining when the move stopped would be an interesting question for computer vision to solve. These kinds ...


7

A notation like Kg1 would give the impression that only the king is moved. At the very least, it is not obvious that castling moves the rook as well.


7

Looks like it's just algebraic notation using Dutch as the language, most likely given the author's nationality and that the rest of the article looks like Dutch - not the whole of the world speaks English! You can translate it yourself using the table at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algebraic_notation_(chess)


6

That would be a rather complex task. Maybe a reasonable first step is to look into recognizing FEN position from a single image - for which more resources exists, for example: Create a FEN from a chess diagram picture Recommended pattern recognition technique for chess board


6

Yes, there are several. Your question is very vague, though. Arena is an OK choice if you're on Windows; otherwise Lichess is an online option. All of these are free, but there are many more, both free and costly ones (but I don't have enough reputation for more links, and I don't know exactly what you're after). The computer-readable format of algebraic ...


6

Since you're talking about programming, you're presumably looking for a storage scheme more compact in computer memory space than FEN. Besides going out to research how it's done in large tablebases, two possibilities come to my mind immediately. Normal FEN For the sake of this discussion, "normal" FEN is just a typical text string represented with 1-byte (...


6

de and fe are normal pawn captures. There is no contradiction in writing de and NxB and Nxe5. The "x" is optional. It would be unusual and inconsistent to write 4. BxNc6 and 4. ... Nc6 in the following - 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. BxNc6 Nc6 but if we put it in fen then it works - [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nge7 4. BxNc6 Nc6 Note what ...


6

Lichess.org allows (free) registered players to upload games and have stockfish analyse them. The site lets you adjust what score difference the computer will consider an inaccuracy, mistake, and error. Many (almost all) chess forums allow you to post a game and ask the other players to comment on the games.


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