28

The c6 knight is pinned by the bishop on b5. Note that if the c6 knight were to move it would leave Black's king in check, which renders any such move illegal. Therefore it is ok in this case to write "Ne7" instead of "Nge7", since the pin means that there is no ambiguity as to which knight moves.


26

I would read it as "Pawn takes something on a1 and promotes to a Queen". Strictly according to the Laws of Chess the = sign should not be there (see article C.11). C.11 In the case of the promotion of a pawn, the actual pawn move is indicated, followed immediately by the abbreviation of the new piece. Examples: d8Q, exf8N, b1B, g1R. However this is a ...


23

Would it be sufficient here to write Ne4+ (meaning Nce4) only (i.e. without the "c" but with "+"), as Nfe4 would not be check? It depends on exactly what you mean by "sufficient". By "normal" definitions of "sufficient" the answer is obviously "yes". "Ne4+" disambiguates and leaves the human reader in no doubt which knight was moved. However it doesn't ...


20

Both recording checks and draw offers are personal preference, and neither is required in your notation. I actually do record both checks as "+" or "++", and draw offers as "(d)". I know I am not the only one to note draw offers as I have friends, who do the same. I also record times. The purpose of the notation is so you, or the arbiter, can play back ...


19

According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: Appendix C. Algebraic notation C.12 The offer of a draw shall be marked as (=) As with a number of the laws regarding recording of the moves this is not strictly enforced by arbiters. I did once play in a tournament in which a very junior arbiter delivered a short harangue to us players telling us to record draw ...


18

The FIDE Laws of Chess 2018 are unambiguous: you should write Nce4, and the + sign is optional and not disambiguating. Ne4+ is not sufficient. Appendix C (algebraic notation), article C.10 basically tells you to write Nce4 to distinguish it from Nfe4. It does not mention check or other ways to disambiguate. Article C.13 notes that writing "+" to indicate ...


14

Your two knights are on d2 and f2. Ndxe4, Nfxe4, Your two knights are on f2 and f6. N2xe4, N6xe4 Your three knights are on d2, f2 and f6 (you promoted a pawn) Ndxe4, Nf2xe4, N6xe4


14

Adding on to Brian Towers' answer, there is a quick way you can script this (assuming you are on Linux or another POSIX system with the tr command): cat gamelog.txt | tr 'abcdefgh12345678' 'hgfedcba87654321' > gamelog_reversed.txt Edit: as @wimi said, this will mess up move numbers, so be careful about that. You may want to use cut and paste to seperate ...


13

If you have two rooks, standing on different files (one of them on the d-file), that could capture on d2, then Rdxd2 is the correct notation. If you have two rooks on the d-file, and both can take on d2, then use the rank number to disambiguate, for instance R1xd2. This is according to the Algebraic System required by FIDE's Laws of Chess (see appendix C, ...


12

Best guess: the mistake occured before, on move 15 Entry errors are frequent when games are entered into a software, especially if they are not entered by one of the players. Here the operator must have made an error before move 19, reached an anomaly, and couldn't solve the mystery (or didn't have time to try, there are other games to be saved). In such ...


11

It hasn't always been so, but these days (at least according to FIDE rules) it's illegal to write your move down before making it, outside of some situations in which a draw is being claimed or the game is being adjourned. Here are the exact details as to when a move should be recorded (with the most relevant part italicized): 8.1. In the course of play ...


11

From the specification: A basic SAN [Standard Algebraic Notation] move is given by listing the moving piece letter (omitted for pawns) followed by the destination square. Capture moves are denoted by the lower case letter "x" immediately prior to the destination square; pawn captures the file letter of the originating square of the capturing pawn ...


11

That's descriptive notation. Click that to go to the wiki page. It is an obsolete notation, having been replaced by algebraic or figurine algebraic notation. B x KP means, Bishop (B) takes (x) Kings (K) Pawn (P). Q-R5 - Queen (Q) Moves To (-) Rook's (R) Fifth square (5) Then there are ways to show castling, etc. EDIT - doubled pawns. Descriptive ...


11

If you set the board up correctly, i.e. "white on the right and queen on her own colour", then you need to flip the letters like this: a ↔ h b ↔ g c ↔ f d ↔ e and the numbers like this: 1 ↔ 8 2 ↔ 7 3 ↔ 6 4 ↔ 5 So, if white's first move was to push the pawn in front of the king 2 squares you will have written "d5" or "...


11

Other than the algebraic nomenclature: Two off the top of my head are Correspondence chess used 1:1 to 8:8 to label the squares. Descriptive notation predated algebraic: 1. P-K4 P-K4 2. KN-B3 QN-B3 and so on.


10

Anything less than or equal to G/29 does not require you to record moves, according to USCF. Otherwise known as Blitz and Quick, they have a separate rating for those time controls. Reference: An Introduction to USCF-Rated Tournaments [PDF] So, yes, you do need to record your moves in a G/30, because that is considered Standard time control. There is a ...


10

The castling notation was invented by Johann Allgaier and used for the first time in his 1811 2nd edition of his Neue theoretisch-praktische Anweisung zum Schachspiel. He didn't explain why he came up with it. Allgaier (and algebraic notation in general) used digit-0. The use of letter-O is an anglo-saxon oddity.


10

Can anyone please explain to me what these symbols mean? These are the abbreviations for the pieces in Dutch. I believe they are almost the same as the German ones (with the exception of the knight = Springer (jumper) in German and = paard (horse) in Dutch (Pferd = horse in German), which are - T = Turm (= Castle, Rook) P = Pferd (= Horse, Knight) L = ...


9

I can think of several reasons: The players will want to know how many moves have been played in the game (as you often get extra time after moves 40 and 60), how many moves have been played before the last pawn move or capture etc. Currently the players may not consult any other material than the score sheets during a game, but even if the rule was changed,...


9

Well, it isn't legal for two reasons, One, lets say that the opponent gave you an handshake. That would mean that the recorded moves are null, and it may cause some troubles with the arbiters. Two, Article 8.1: In the course of play each player is required to record his own moves and those of his opponent in the correct manner, move after move, as ...


8

From the PGN specification (http://www6.chessclub.com/help/PGN-spec): Neither the appearance nor the absence of either a check or checkmating indicator is used for disambiguation purposes. This means that if two (or more) pieces of the same type can move to the same square the differences in checking status of the moves does not allieviate the ...


8

AFAIK, Edward Lasker (not Emmanuel) Lasker was the only master player resident in the USA to publish in Algebraic before the 1970s, substituting English initials for the German he would have used before immigrating. Not only are Bobby Fischer's books in Descriptive, so are his scoresheets. I don't know about 18th Century usage, but I have read 19th Century ...


8

While it's not ambiguous (only Nfe3 is legal), it is better to be specific with Nfe3. Successful software can deal with both Ne3 and Nfe3, but not every pgn parser is perfect, and some beginners will appreciate the additional guidance.


8

According to the online manual for the app, After each engine's move, the output [d/s]eval indicates a search depth d, a selective search depth s, and an evaluation in centipawns eval from white's perspective. For instance, the output [4/8]-103 indicates that the engine searched 4 plies ahead, with some variations even 8 plies ahead, and thinks that black ...


7

I have a scoresheet I created for my own use here: https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B4uNw3C8V0SDZjZneGVUVTVaNlU/edit?usp=sharing I have pdf versions in various colors and the MS Publisher file I used to create it. So if you have MS Publisher you can modify it. The readme.txt file in that folder has descriptions of the files.


7

It's 2019-12 now and 5 years after the original question. Does any such thing exist (webcam/video to pgn converter)? A prototype maybe? see https://github.com/WolfgangFahl/play-chess-with-a-webcam/issues/19 https://github.com/WolfgangFahl/play-chess-with-a-webcam/issues/22 which are both closed by now. See http://lichess.bitplan.com for a game ...


7

A notation like Kg1 would give the impression that only the king is moved. At the very least, it is not obvious that castling moves the rook as well.


7

Well, after your update I come to the conclusion that these signs are used by the author to mark the omission of the notation of the respective move by White. This is not a common usage of them, and I have never seen it before. It should be documented somewhere at the beginning or end of the book. But I'd not be surprised if it's not, since it doesn't ...


7

For an online tool, lichess is good. You can enter your game and have it analysed by a computer engine. The analysed game will have annotations in plain language ("mistake/blunder/inaccuracy") and of course contain the computer evaluation score after each move. Once you have a game analysed on lichess, they have another good feature called: "Learn from ...


7

Looks like it's just algebraic notation using Dutch as the language, most likely given the author's nationality and that the rest of the article looks like Dutch - not the whole of the world speaks English! You can translate it yourself using the table at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algebraic_notation_(chess)


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