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3

For example, after 1. e4 e5 you could play 2. f4 or 2. Nf3, and the computer will tell you they're both top moves in this position without marking either of them as an inaccuracy or a mistake. That's because there is a line of code in the program which says something like: If (move is in book) then set move value = accurate else call regular evaluation ...


1

Generally though, the more pieces are on the board, the harder it is for engines to find a big advantage because there are many possible moves which make it harder for the engine to predict the outcome and alter the positional score greatly. The answer really is that in some middlegames (closed positions) will often allow you to make many moves since not too ...


2

Due to prior knowledge, I scoured these three chessgames.com collections that I knew of. I found two games that match. They do fit the bill of having the promoted knight protecting a rook. However, they're quite longer than 20 moves, are in the endgame, and have different material balances from what you think. It does help that they are recent games, ...


2

Having a space advantage means you have more room to navigate your pieces. Space may allow you to attack on both sides of the board, or attack on one side then switch to the other; the cramped defender simple can't navigate as well. You may be able to dominate an open file as it is easier for you to double or triple heavy pieces. In late middlegame to ...


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