17

If this helps, I'm developing an interactive tree graph with chess traps and openings at http://www.chesstree.net. Currently, it shows common openings, how often they are used, and their win-loss ratios. You can also search openings and save your custom openings with comments. It also has a batch of traps in it, although their presentation is yet somewhat ...


11

Perhaps you were looking for something like this: http://www.chessfornovices.com/chessopeningsconclusion.html


9

You really have a couple of questions here. First, when it comes to memorization in chess, it has been shown that the more positions you have seen, the more likely you are to remember other positions. I remember once that GM Susan Polgar was given some random chess positions, and she remembered the "normal" ones exceptionally well, however, when the ...


8

Chess theory in this sense refers to opening variations / opening analysis. Every strong player has a repertoire of opening lines that he likes to play and in which he knows pretty well which moves are the best. Some players analyse the opening exhaustively and try to find tricky lines before they sit down to play. This is helped by the fact that they can ...


8

My experience shows me that in order to apply chess strategies during the game, remembering them alone is often not the main issue. There is a gap between just remembering a strategy and being able to apply it during your game. If you want to improve your knowledge of imbalances, I suggest that you set up a few training positions from a book (or from your ...


7

Yes, definitely. Try to feel 0 through 10 in the air, like you're doing grocery list calculations. For most people, across all cultures, we have a number line that starts small on the left and gets bigger to the right. Synaesthetes actually see numbers in this way. I definitely have a kinesthetic sense for chess. I'd like to think I'm not very unique in ...


6

You can build your own with e.g. a mind map tool (http://www.xmind.net/) together with a complete listing of chess openings (e.g. at http://www.chess.com/openings/).


6

It won't help much. You won't understand why they are choosing the moves they are making. The easiest and fastest way to improve is to go to your local chess club. They will pair you with opponents of your skill level. The better players will help you.


6

Playing blindfold is not going to be easy, as @Annatar states. Only if you practice much (and accept that you're going to fail the first few times), you will succeed and over time it will probably become easier. That said, here are some hints: Start with short games. It's easier to replay a 15 move miniature than a 80 move endgame with lots of rook ...


5

I remember them as DIMPS (development, initiative, minor, pawn, space).


5

I went through a number of chess books where advice on memorisation techniques might be expected, but I did not find anything that resembles Bouwmeester's proposed technique. Below is what I found; the books are listed in chronological order, except for Soltis. Maizelis (1960) Ilya Maizelis: The Soviet Chess Primer (English translation, 2014; original ...


5

IMPLODeS I - Initiative M - Material P - Pawn Structure L - Lines O - Officers (referring to the Knights and Bishops i.e. Minor Pieces) De - Development S - Space


5

Minor Pieces Pawn Structures Space Material Files and squares Development Initiative You shouldn't try to memorizing the Silman's Imbalances material but instead understand them so you will naturally use them in your play. Here is how I would use these imbalances during the game: Opening Stage: Development and Initiative usually exists here so focus on ...


5

I'm going to be a bit contrarian and say that it may be more beneficial than the other answers here seem to imply. The reasoning is simple - what is the easiest way to remember a series of moves? Not by simply remembering which piece moved where, but by understanding what the purpose of each move is. And if you know the purpose of each move, your mind may ...


4

Yes, it should have some impact, especially on players who learn strategic patterns of typical middlegame positions via visualizing themes like "play on dark squares in King's Indian Defense". Even replaying opening variations you are familiar with - would take slightly more effort. Writing those opening moves down on a scoresheet would feel strange too ...


4

On Chess.com you can use the mobile app, then click the three bars (menu) and then click 'vision'; this is basically a game where you look at blank board and it says 'g8' then you hit g8 with your thumb then it goes 'c3'etc etc. You are doing this against time you get a score and all at the end of the time but it does help memorizing the spaces, I've found. ...


4

There is no credible evidence that supplements benefit cognitive functioning in people who don't have clinical disorders. The only people making those claims are people trying to sell you something. As mentioned above, the only indicated rationale for such treatment is with a nutritional disorder, or some other type of clinical problem. http://www.ncbi....


4

I am the author of the software that you might be needing. For example, it is possible to set up an exercise like this https://szachydzieciom.pl/?page_id=5216&lang=en#6 where the task is to replay blindfold from the score the famous opera game. The score need not be shown, it's just an option. It need not be blindfold, either, it's just an option. I can ...


4

World champion Lasker said that he did not memorize anything that he could deduce for himself. You need to know the BASIC tactical positions and mates but you do not need to memorize thousands of positions. If you have seen the position and understand the motif then you will be able to do it in similar positions in your games. As to world champions and ...


3

Categorize them! 1: Easy to assess - Material, King Safety, Development 2: More difficult - Pawn Structure, Space 3: Difficult - Statics vs Dynamics, Initiative, Key files/Squares/Diagonals.


3

The list of imbalances Silman provides in Reassess Your Chess runs: Superior Minor Piece Pawn Structure Doubled Isolated Backward Passed Space Material Control of key lines and squares Development Initiative You can see that a) There are 2 elements beginning with an "S", and b) There are no priorities offered Since this is the case, you ...


3

This is unlikely to work for adults. For children it has been shown that giving vitamin supplements produces an overall average increase in IQ over a large population. If this experiment is repeated over a population which is restricted to only include those who are already getting their daily requirement then no increase is seen. So, if you are a child ...


3

I like the online chesstempo beta opening manager and trainer. I have read on the facebook page of chess position trainer, that chess position trainer 6 is coming this year. I aspect a lot from this software. Lucas Chess has some interesting repertoire making functions. Like importing best moves or all best moves from a bin book, for one collar. You can ...


2

It's hard to beat Morphy when it comes to a dominance over contemporaries that leads to short, memorable games that culminate in utterly violent punishment of the failure to develop one's pieces. And while it's also hard to top the opera box game from the OP for a seamless destruction of a poorly developed army, the following two dismantlings are quite nice ...


2

Morphy is great! I also am fond of the 1956 game Donald Byrne vs Robert James Fischer (when Fischer was 13 years old!) known as "The Game of the Century". Link But of course there are many games that are great. Chessbase has an app for the Android or iPhone with a database of many of the great games to look at - just $5.


2

Bookup/Chess Openings Wizard, Chess Opening Trainer (which had a PC version too) and Chess Position Trainer are some of the main options, but just for completeness sake: Chessbase lets you add 'training annotation' to moves in a game, so when you switch on training, it will hide the continuation, and quiz you. Lucas Chess now lets you set up a Personal ...


2

The very commercial Bookup (also goes by the name Chess Openings Wizard) is probably the big contender for the PC. I believe there are a few phone apps that help with this as well like the Chess Opening Trainer (iPhone)


2

You can use Listudy (disclaimer I own that site) for exactly that. I created Listudy to train my own repertoire by playing against it. For this spaced repetition is used so the training is always working on the moves you're weakest on. You can upload your own repertoire in form of a PGN or import studies from Lichess. You can look here for example studies: ...


2

My mnemonic is (MPSMFSDI): "My Playing Skills Must Find Simple Dramatic Improvement"- Minor pieces/ Pawn Structure/ Space/ Material/ Files and../ Squares/ Development/ Initiative/ Though the how, what, why and where to APPLY these, in spite of owning Silman's books is far more difficult to implement, and I just can't seem to win any games using these ...


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