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27 votes
Accepted

How many pawns make up for a missing queen in the endgame?

The simple and obvious answer is that it all depends on the position of black's pawns and king. In general the further up the board the pawns the better for black provided the king is in contact with ...
Brian Towers's user avatar
  • 98.6k
20 votes
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Does blitz change the relative value of position vs material?

It just seemed obvious to me that gambits would work better with faster games, for the same reasons as given in the comments - it's harder to defend than attack, etc. I tried looking at several ...
D M's user avatar
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13 votes
Accepted

Why is this position considered to give white a significant advantage?

[FEN "r4rk1/2p1qppp/1p3n2/p7/2B4B/4P3/PPQN1Pbb/2KRR3 w - - 0 1"] 1. f3 {traps the bishop} Rad8 2. Re2 Bxf3 (2...Bd6 Rxg2 Kh8 Rh1 {the Black king is not safe at all}) 3. Bxf6 Qxf6 (3...gxf6 ...
B.Swan's user avatar
  • 3,488
13 votes
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How to objectively explain a positional advantage is worth a sacrifice (re: a specific example)

White has a lot of compensation for the sacrificed exchange, specifically: more space: the white central pawns are perfectly placed to limit the movement of the black knight and bishop play on the ...
user1583209's user avatar
  • 20.8k
12 votes
Accepted

Shortest sequence of moves to create biggest material imbalance

I got this, which is much shorter. [FEN ""] 1. a4 a5 2. b4 b5 3. c4 c5 4. d4 d5 5. e4 e5 6. f4 f5 7. g4 g5 8. h4 h5 9. bxa5 Bd6 10. axb5 Be6 11. dxc5 Nf6 12. cxd5 O-O 13. fxe5 Rf7 14. exf5 ...
orlp's user avatar
  • 558
10 votes

How many pawns make up for a missing queen in the endgame?

First of all, White wins in the diagram you provide, although it's not obvious at a glance how. White plays Qf2 first to stop the king from advancing. Black can't just sit there forever because the ...
D M's user avatar
  • 19.7k
10 votes
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When is a queen better than 3 minor pieces (or vice versa)?

The queen does a good job when there are a lot of weaknesses to attack, especially if the opponent's king is out in the open, so there are a lot of options for double attacks. The pieces are ...
BlindKungFuMaster's user avatar
9 votes

Are there any gambits which yield an advantage for the side down material?

While it's a gambit by Black, what about Tal's gambit? Black is scoring 55% in 228 grandmaster and elite correspondence games after 1 e4 c5; 2 f4 d5; 3 exd5 Nf6. I'd call Black doing better than 50% ...
C Monsour's user avatar
  • 191
8 votes

When is a queen stronger than two rooks?

As a general rule, two Rooks tend to be stronger than a Queen. Typical endgames like 2R+5P vs Q+5P are much better for the rooks who will coordinate to attack the opponent's weakest pawn. However, ...
Evargalo's user avatar
  • 16.4k
6 votes

Are there any gambits which yield an advantage for the side down material?

Games 61/62 of the 17th TCEC season featured such a gambit: [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c5 3. d5 Qb6 4. Nc3 White gambits the b2-pawn. After 4...Qxb2 5. Bd2, Stockfish evaluated the position as +0.61 ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 27.9k
6 votes

How to objectively explain a positional advantage is worth a sacrifice (re: a specific example)

This answers your question by showing the pull White has. White's advantage is real. But I think it is important to notice how resilient a defender can be. This is a great example of how difficult it ...
Tony Ennis's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

When is a bishop stronger than a rook?

The standard value for a piece that we learn early on (Queen=9 pawns, Rook=5 pawns, Bishop,Knight=3 pawns) is often a very good guidepost for people to make proper trades and find good tactical ...
Scounged's user avatar
  • 7,998
5 votes

Are there any gambits which yield an advantage for the side down material?

You can play the Queen's gambit if you go for 3.Nf3, actually offering your opponent a chance to stick to the pawn later on, so even if it's not a "real gambit" at move 2, you can turn it into one ...
David's user avatar
  • 16.3k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it ever advantageous to make a trade that loses material for the sake a positional advantage?

Yes! It is. One common example of giving up material for positional reasons is the exchange sacrifice. See Laszlo Szabo vs Tigran Petrosian. On move 14 Petrosian sacrifices the rook for the knight in ...
Awalrod's user avatar
  • 199
3 votes

When is a queen better than 3 minor pieces (or vice versa)?

A lot depends on whether there are other pieces involved and the pawn structure. If you mean positions with Q alone vs three minor pieces then relative king safety comes into play. The side with the Q ...
cousin_pete's user avatar
  • 1,302
3 votes
Accepted

How is a game of chess won?

If you don't count forfeits (including time forfeits) then yes, the two possibilities for losing a game are resignation or checkmate. There may be other reasons for resignation than material or ...
D M's user avatar
  • 19.7k
3 votes

How to objectively explain a positional advantage is worth a sacrifice (re: a specific example)

By material, white is down three pawns. (R+P vs B) -3 White has the bishop pair, which is ~pawn 1 White has more space ~ 1/2 pawn 1/2 White has great lead in ...
Fred Knight's user avatar
  • 3,142
2 votes

What is sufficient mating material?

AFAIK sufficient mating material is considered as such if a "helpmate" can be demonstrated in any number of moves. Put another way, it is as if the player that ran out of time is out of the game, and ...
yonil's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes

Are there any gambits which yield an advantage for the side down material?

A variation of the Caro Kann, Advance: Tal Variation called Caveman Variation is a "gambit" where White can gambit mere pawns, or whole pieces, but probably will mate. If Black should go for ...
B.Swan's user avatar
  • 3,488
2 votes

When is a queen better than 3 minor pieces (or vice versa)?

According to the Syzygy tablebase, the position is likelier to be winning for the queen than for the minor pieces. in KQ v KBBN, 48.9% of positions are wins for KQ, a further 2.3% are frustrated wins ...
Rosie F's user avatar
  • 6,425
2 votes

When is a queen better than 3 minor pieces (or vice versa)?

Generally speaking the queen is going to be better when the opponent's king is exposed to checks and/or when the position is "loose" ie pieces and pawns hanging, pawn weaknesses etc. If the ...
Savage47's user avatar
  • 4,269
2 votes

Maximum futile material (in illegal position) neither winning nor forcing stalemate

I don't think this position can be improved, but feel free to show me the contrary (note that the double check is retroillegal too, but who cares in an illegal position!): [FEN "Krkqqqqq/q1pqqqqq/...
Hauke Reddmann's user avatar
2 votes

When material is counterproductive (construction task)

Many solutions indeed exist. The hard part is actually finding one. All pieces must be intertwined. With a few promoted bishops, I have managed to find one. It can be reached in 55 moves. [FEN "&...
Rewan Demontay's user avatar
1 vote

Is it ever advantageous to make a trade that loses material for the sake a positional advantage?

Yes. Here is a trivial example: [FEN "4k3/8/1p1p1p1p/pPpPpPpP/P1P1P1P1/8/8/R2QK2R w - - 0 1"] White to move can't make progress except by sacrificing their queen against one of Black's pawns....
Polytropos's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Maximum futile material (in illegal position) neither winning nor forcing stalemate

If I count right we actually do a bit better than Hauke Reddmann's construction by giving White a pawn and the initiative: [FEN "kqqqqqqq/Pqqqqqqq/qqqqqqqq/qqqqqqqq/qqqqqqqq/qqqqqqqq/qqqqqqrb/...
Noam D. Elkies's user avatar
1 vote

Are there any gambits which yield an advantage for the side down material?

Yes, for example, the Polugaevsky gambit has a positive evaluation for White and it was used by AlphaZero against Stockfish back in 2017, producing an absolutely stunning game. Btw, 21. Bg5!! is not a ...
db_max's user avatar
  • 847
1 vote

Are there any gambits which yield an advantage for the side down material?

the fried liver is one of the 2 only real gambit stockfish likes, or the queens gambit. it appears that the benko gambit is one gambit that have big pressure against whites Q side
DanishGambiter's user avatar
1 vote

How to exploit the advantage of a bishop over a knight?

What are some guidelines for playing in this situation, or top player games that give a clear demonstration of possible plans? It is probably worth starting off by recommending two books. ...
Brian Towers's user avatar
  • 98.6k
1 vote

When is a queen stronger than two rooks?

If there are a lot of pawns left on the board.. a slight edge exists to the Queen. If there is an extra minor piece for both sides(Knight would be a perfect complement for queen) it can win. If rooks ...
sider's user avatar
  • 11

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