8

How? Yourself :-) This should not discourage you from getting the help of an engine - afterwards §. Also, to me it seems critical to what end you are analyzing master games. There are many answers to this question, almost as many as masters. You analyze a Morphy game? Great choice, learn how opening sins (especially underdevelopment) are punished mercylessly....


6

You may be confusing the passive (but thoroughly enjoyable) pastime of playing through a game which has already been annotated (whether by a human or an engine) and the active one of doing the hard work of going through a game and trying to work out what is going on, what the best moves are. There is an excellent YouTube video on the "Hanging Pawns"...


6

Tal vs Botvinnik 1960 is very good as Tal is quite verbose in commentary and what he was thinking about during the game. In addition to the benefits you mentioned, the annotations help you understand what strong players think about in different positions and how they approach the game. Particularly useful is the strong player's positional understanding and ...


4

Found a Rubinstein game! [fen ""] [Date "1908.??.??"] [White "Alapin, Simon"] [Black "Rubinstein, Akiba"] [WhiteElo "2500"] [BlackElo "2640"] [Result "0-1"] 1.e4 e5 2.Ne2 Nf6 3.f4 Nxe4 4.d3 Nc5 5.fxe5 d5 6.d4 Ne6 7.Nf4 c5 8.Nc3 cxd4 9.Ncxd5 Nc6 10.Bd2 Nxf4 11.Nxf4 Nxe5 12.Bb5+ Bd7 13.Qe2 ...


3

Here is one game which should match your request (Swiderski, Rudolf vs. Nimzowitsch, Aaron): [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.c4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 c6 6.Nf3 Be7 7.Qc2 O-O 8.Rd1 Re8 9.Bd3 dxc4 10.Bxc4 Nd5 11.Bxe7 Qxe7 12.O-O b5 13.Bxd5 cxd5 14.Nxb5 Ba6 15. Qa4 Bxb5 16.Qxb5 Reb8 17.Qe2 a5 18....


2

I found that flashcards are a great tool to help memorize complete games and game openings. They allow one to implement in practice many concepts mentioned in earlier answers. There are many flashcard software available, including free ones. Some allow to schedule future reviews based on the difficulty of a recall. The idea is to drill difficult moves more ...


2

I know I am late to the party but if anyone is still looking for answer then here's complete source code of my png parser


1

very typical example, this position happened millions of times in chess history: k7/3Q4/1K6/8/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1 Qb7#, 1. Qc7 Stalemate, 1.Qc6 can start perpetual - just be careful - don't checkmate your opponent by accident :) Just wondering - if this is really worth studying, but you get what you ask for ...


1

Playing through annotated game collections can be very useful. However in this regard I very much agree with Dan Heisman who advocates strongly for what he calls Instructive Game Anthologies. He distinguishes this from game collection books by a top grandmaster and says that the author of an instructive anthology is trying to use the game to demonstrate ...


1

Playing over many GM games is excellent. You get used to seeing good moves which improves your intuition at playing. Annotation is helpful but only when you have a real question about what was done. In general things that happen and are explained are rare and not that useful. Far better to study tactics than obsess about annotations. I would suggest you ...


1

I'm not sure about a world championship game, but genuine underpromotions do occur now and then in grandmaster games. For a starting shot, here is the famous 2012 game with a knight promotion by Hikaru Nakamura. According to the FIDE rating website, Nakamura's rating at the time was 2783 the month game was played. By "highest level," I took that to ...


1

I would recommend the games collection from the book "Gm-Ram: Essential Grandmaster Chess Knowledge" by Rashid Ziyatdinov. Not all the games are the miniatures, but many of them. The author suggests that to become a chess master, one has to remember by heart some positions and games. It looks aligned with your goal (reviewing / memorizing). I've ...


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