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14

The best practice would be to thoroughly analyze the game and also your thought process before, during and after the game. Besides, if after sincere hard efforts you still lose, it's important to have an attitude like this - “I haven't failed, I've found 10,000 ways that don't work” - Thomas Edison In chess, that would mean - I haven't failed, I ...


12

Don't forget to be a good sport. Smile, shake hands with the winner, and congratulate them on a good game. Then later, when you've calmed down, when you're in a more focused frame of mind, analyze your game. (Keep a notebook of the moves). 1) Look for obvious blunders - hanging pieces, bad trades 2) Look for tactical mistakes - forks, pins, etc. 3) Look ...


11

We were all there, it is normal. It is a psychological problem, but without 3+ sample games there is nothing I can do to help you. If you could edit your post with 3+ games that illustrate typical scenario, I could engage in solving your problem with greater effect. Without the games the best I can advise you is : Know your opening -> ask here if you ...


7

Note: I'm an average player, who learnt chess about 2 years ago, maybe I'm not the right guy to answer such question but I will try. I wanted to ask a similar question, maybe I will today or tomorrow. As for your question. Top level players do make mistakes, maybe they underestimate the opponent, maybe under time pressure, maybe they just don't see the ...


7

I think you have hit the nail on the head with "Do I just need to get my mind Right?" For many years I had very inconsistent form, I would try very hard and work on my game frequently, I saw gradual improvement but yet I would still find myself losing to players I really shouldn't... Here is my last two years of form click here Chess is a game which will ...


7

Usually when you are decisively down in material, the best option is to make the position as complicated as possible. If you don't create any threats, your opponent doesn't have a chance to go wrong. And if nothing special happens, you are going to lose. So stir it up, create a mess, chaos on the board and suddenly everything is possible again, especially if ...


7

Black attempts to claim a win under 7.5.5. Does this stand? No. According to 7.5.5 - After the action taken under Article 7.5.1, 7.5.2, 7.5.3 or 7.5.4 for the first completed illegal move by a player, the arbiter shall give two minutes extra time to his opponent; for the second completed illegal move by the same player the arbiter shall declare the ...


6

As I see it, at that level they have two options, if they suspect their opponent prepared a trap: They trust their preparation, and their knowledge, go on as usual, and just make the best moves, and hope for the best. In the Sinquefield cup last year, or the year before, there was a game MVL-Carlsen, when this happened exactly, Carlsen was caught by MVL-s ...


6

From the way the question is written it seems like these flaws in your chess are uncharacteristic, and that you recently noticed that they've suddenly become way more apparent than before. The first point about putting pieces en prise does indeed seem uncharacteristic for any player >2000 Elo, unless we're dealing with very short time controls. For a ...


4

Almost by definition, the advantage needed to win gets smaller and smaller, the higher level the players get. Between two rank beginners, the loss of a pawn or even a piece means very little, because such players will lose pawns and pieces to each other almost at random. One of them wins after the the other has made several mistakes, and gotten several ...


4

Embrace improving at chess. Make it your primary goal. Get set in your mind that winning is secondary. Take action on the new goal. Analyze all your games. Analyze with your opponent whenever possible. Try to play longer games you can record, and leave blitz for online play (where the computer records your games) Take some time before you resign to get ...


4

I have a FIDE 1996 rating and I had the same problem you have now. What fixed for me was to play many slow games G/30 minimum and G/60 ideal, and then have Shredder do a quick blunder check on these games. I slowly learned where I am most likely to make silly mistakes. I also changed my game mindset. Rather than try to get a winning position I chose to aim ...


3

General Play Building habits is a good way to get out of the rut. Depending on the the time it could be fundamental to analyze the board and the opponents move to gain a general sense of the direction and goals of each side, of course this is most likely acknowledged by you. A way to reduce blunders is to manage time, which imposes how you multitask. If ...


3

The first question to ask yourself when you are losing is "Is it time to resign yet?" Sometimes the best play is to resign. There are two good reasons for resigning: 1) Like when a boxer's trainer throws in the towel or the referee stops the fight - to save yourself from further punishment. 2) Out of respect for your opponent in the case where you have ...


3

Slumps such as this happen to me often. It's extremely frustrating isn't it? It is very similar to tilting in say poker. When this happens to me in chess, I realise I have started playing for rating, akin to when you chase your losses in poker. Rating, not the enjoyment of chess, becomes my main and sole goal. When this happens, it is easy to start letting ...


3

The goal of chess players is, ultimately, to create a threat that cannot be stopped. But chess is a famously balanced game. There is no way to create an unstoppable threat unless one of the players errs. In the simple case, one player moves, the other counters, etc. No one makes any headway. At the higher levels, players drop material so rarely that it ...


3

Simply, at the top-level, a player has enough technique to exploit every little advantage. That's not always true at lower levels. Thus, losing a pawn without compensation may be a little blunder in a match between two beginners, since the opponent could make a bigger blunder on the next moves, and lose the advantage. In a match between 2 pros, a blunder ...


3

World champion Jose Raul Capablanca once said, "From few of my won games have I learned as much as most of my losses." So look upon a lost game as learning experience. They're usually easier to remember than your wins. To this day, I remember how someone beat me forty years ago with a $450 hotel on Baltic avenue because I had mortgaged everything getting ...


3

I have had a similar issue. My gym professor, as strange as it may sound, is a good chess player, and we used to play a lot of games. I usually lost or drew, until at one moment I used a tactic to win just one game. From then my score on him has improved, and I have won a couple more times. The only thing to do is break a win once, and you will beat him ...


3

An article by IM Silman, interestingly explains this at the elite level (>2700 club) Check this out- http://www.chess.com/article/view/the-difficult-opponent


3

Interesting! Yes I think to some extent we've all had similar experiences but probably under very different circumstances (school chess, club chess, tourneys, between friends etc). Chess is a very dynamic game, in the sense that beating someone doesn't always mean you're necessarily better or understand the game better, it may very well be so. Of course ...


3

I would take quite seriously the possibility of taking medical advice. Our chess ability, measured objectively by rating, is a very sensitive measure of our mental health is several ways. Some years ago my thyroid gland became underactive (hypothyroidism) which leads to a slowing down of mental processes. This went undiagnosed for two years, because being ...


3

Yes, these positions can be very rewarding. Sometimes, in endgames, there are stalemate possibilities. In middlegames and even endgames there can be tactical possibilities. If you are far enough behind in material that a standard approach by your opponent of just swapping pieces is going to yield a straightforward win you need to be inventive to make him ...


2

I see two things you can consider: trying to learn how to control your stress. playing many faster games to get used to play and think more quickly (if you often play games with 15 minutes per side, try to play games with 10 minutes per side). Therefore you most probably won't often be in this situation anymore.


2

How's it going? Any improvement yet? A slump could be as a result of a lack of concentration amongst other things. Maybe this post can help you out - http://www.chessfiles.com/chessfiles-blog/oh-man-am-i-in-a-slump-again


2

It is always best to play offensive if you are losing, if you play defensive then you will just suffer as your opponent keeps expanding his advantage. Do not take on the offensive so quickly though if you are in a bad position. You have to judge the position correctly and just try to find the best moves, however if it is astoundingly poor then you need to ...


2

Playing on in a hopeless position when it is clear to you that your opponent has the knowledge, skill and time to finish you off is never honourable. It shows a lack of respect. If you have played your moves much faster than your opponent so that he is in serious time trouble and you aren't, then it is perfectly reasonable to play on. With just a few ...


1

It depends. When you are completely lost, and there is nothing interesting, you should resign. I say "nothing interesting" because it is etiquette to let your opponent mate you if he has a pretty force mate against you.


1

These things typically happen because you get into a type of game that represent's A's strength and your weakness. That's true, even if you do better than A against random players, "B," who don't fall into this pattern. Find out how the B's outplay A. Maybe A outplays you tactically, and B outplays him positionally (or vice-versa). Then try to imitate the ...


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