18

Chess strategy is complex and has several ingredients mingling at the same time. It is true that 3 c3 helps white mantaining two center pawns if black decides for a c:d4 pawn exchange. But black isn't forced to that and the move c3 has some incovenients. To list just two: blocks the c3 square which is the natural place for developing the Q-side knight; ...


11

Why is h4 much better than h3? It's very simple. The prospects for the bishop are much better on g3 than h2. On h2 the bishop does nothing useful and it will take a lot of moves to get it back into the game via g1. Black will exert iron control over f4 with pawns on e5 and g5 making the freeing move f2-f4 impossible. On g3 the bishop has a role protecting ...


7

After 10.h4 g4, the kingside pawn structure is more favorable for White. Black's g- and h-pawns are blocked, they are too far advanced and feel more weak than strong. Black doesn't have possibilies for a kingside attack because of the blocked pawns. White's king will be safe on g1 after castling short. This is the most important factor. Far advanced pawns ...


5

Move 3 is a bit early for such positional evaluations, but some food for thoughts: after 3...cd 4.ed, e7-e6 will be played, rather sooner than later but then the pawn structure in the center is fixed, which makes it hard for Black to "exploit" his extra central pawn. Any expansion with ...f6 and ...e5 is out of question for at least the next 20 ...


3

Just a small addendum: As a Bf4 player who never plays London but his own obscure systems (which are extremely dangerous for both sides - in the days before computer preparation, I clobbered a few GMs with them I only play e3. My own experience is that the most doubly-edged Black plan is pestering b2 with his queen. e3 (developing, also keeping the option ...


3

The number of central pawns is one of the factor that matter in the evaluation of a position, but it's definitely not the only one. While I think both 3.e3 and 3.c3 are playable, 3.e3 helps your development, while 3.c3 does not. If Black takes on d4, White gets an amazing outpost on the e5 square. In fact, Black would wish he could put his e6 pawn on the &...


2

The early Nd2 gives some breathing room for your a1 rook [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Bf4 Nf6 3. e3 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 Bf5 8. Qc1 (5. Nd2 Qb6 6. Qb3 c4 7. Qc2 g6 8. e4) Notice how black cannot easily harass your queen and get a lead in development with Bf5 in the early Nd2 case


1

It's a lot easier for a beginner to play the first 10 moves of the London System than it is if they were playing a complicated opening with lots of sidelines. If you open on e5, you might have to learn quite a lot of different openings depending on black's response, e.g. the Sicilian for 1..c5, the French for 1..e6, the Ruy Lopez for 1..e5, the Caro-Khan ...


1

As a beginner, I like playing the London system as a general guide to opening. It is easy to set up and easy to remember. However, it does not absolve me from being completely absent minded to what my opponent is doing. I generally play other beginners that do weird shit like brining their queen out too early or moves like a5 or g5 that open up opportunities ...


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