37

Although I agree that chess is 90% tactics when actually playing at the board, it really depends on where you are strenght-wise as to how much time you spend on tactics. By the way, when they use the word "tactics" there, I would say "tactics and calculation". When you are beginning, I firmly believe that spending 90% of your time on tactics will be the ...


36

There are many people who want to play chess with you. You can play chess online! Online sites such as chess.com and lichess.org will match you with opponents of similar rating so you should win about 50 percent of the time. Furthermore, playing online as well as studying chess will immensely improve your chess, and maybe you'll play your friend again and ...


33

There are lots of ways to play with a handicap in chess. One way is to give one player a starting material advantage, where the weaker player starts with an extra queen, or the stronger player replaces their queen with a bishop/rook, or starts with some of their pawns missing - anything that weakens one player's starting position can be used to even the odds....


20

The answer from SmallChess is good. There's also an illustrative tweet from Garry Kasparov on the subject: For beginning chess players, studying a Carlsen game is like wanting to be an electrical engineer & beginning with studying an iPhone.


20

I will go back to what Artur Yusupov, three-time World Championship Candidate, former top-10 player, and one of the greatest living trainers recommends in the first book of his 10-volume series. In volume one, "Boost Your Chess - Build Up Your Chess", chapter 9, which is two-move mates, including composed problems: The aim of this lesson is to improve ...


17

There's another famous quote you need to pair with "Chess is 90% tactics." Spielmann was reported to remark, after hearing one too many people exclaiming about an Alekhine combination, "I could find those combinations myself, just as easily, if I had his positions. But I never get those positions!" And that's the rub. The game-winning tactics you see in the ...


16

Paul Morphy's games are better resources for learning at your level. There's no use for you to get into deep positional understanding typically in modern GM games. You should get a book on Amazon. Don't try to analyze the games yourself.


16

If you can change your attitude from this being a competition that you are "losing" to this being a tutorial, that should help a lot. Every time you play a game, you get more famailiar with lines and their responses. Consider each move to be a question (what sort of responses are this to this move?) rather than a challenge.


12

The Soviet Union used to dominate chess because it had state-sponsored schools that provided high-quality trainers. After the Soviet Union broke up, funding dried up, and many of these trainers emigrated. Naturally the competitors caught up. Vladimir Kramnik discusses some of this in an interview he gave with chess.com. Chess.com: Much has been written ...


10

One of the most important things we tell players who are a bit above beginner level is to have a checklist they go through before making each move. It looks like this: checks captures threats opponent's threats ... blunder check So, as part of their move selection, they first look to see if they can give a check. If so they calculate the results. Then they ...


9

If you're a beginner then studying games from the old masters does more good, especially players like Morphy who emphasized the basics (quick development, attacking an uncastled king, etc). Once you get to the 1500 range, you'd do best looking at games from the GMs of the 20th century up until the 1990s. That was when classical chess theory "matured", so to ...


9

When they're analyzing at a rapid pace, they tend to only need the thumb and index finger to pick up pieces and move them. Using the middle finger as well doesn't really help. So since that finger is freed up, they can use it to point (especially because pointing with the 4th finger or pinkie is awkward). Or they subconsciously despise each other.


8

I'd like to start with this comment of yours: "I fear that without this abusive online playing my abilities OTB will be damaged." I know where you are coming from, because I've been there, too. I used to be ridiculously addicted to chess - and I wasn't even very good lol. Now it's a hobby, which is much more healthy. I also know that fear you speak of - ...


7

Pretty much all great players studied the games of the best players of the past, and it is repeatedly recommended that studying them is a great way to improve. Marin's book Learn from the Legends is pretty much based around his journey of doing that.


7

It's really a matter of taste and style. One option may suit more your style than the other. But if you believe in a "moneyball approach", 3...e6 appears to be the "best" move for black based on a search on the 365chess.com website. Regarding the number of games, I guess that the difference in black's winning chances (30.2% for 3...e6) versus (26% for 3......


7

Endgame studies are a particular form of tactical problem. I think variety is always good here, but, most importantly, since consistency is critical for improvement at chess, I would suggest you to focus on the type of exercise you enjoy most! (You won't train for too long if it's a sacrifice rather than a pleasure.) I disagree with the "tactics can lead to ...


7

This is not specifically for diagonals, but this is how I learned to visualize the board. I am not sure that I agree that you should be able to know what color a particular square is. I have been playing tournaments for 40 years this year, more than 30 at the master level, and I still do not think about the color of squares at all with regards to calculation ...


6

I think you are asking the wrong question. There's been recently a lot of (horrible?) marketing relating chess to Alzheimer's disease prevention, abstract reasoning skill improvement and so on. While this is all great, and very interesting from a scientific point of view, I'll say it's irrelevant! The reason for that is that nobody plays chess because it's ...


6

This is a game between beginners. Nothing wrong with that, but there is not much point at this level giving a very deep explanation as to the "why". Both players should pay more attention to not blunder pieces in one move not miss mate in one move Concretely: From move 1 to move 4 a pawn was hanging on e5. White could/should have taken it earlier and ...


6

Definitely study classic Morphy's games. The fact that Morphy was so far ahead of his peers is a good thing. His opponents often missed Morphy's plan and the plan came out clearly, and it shows you what you should strive to do. In modern chess so much depends on opening preparation, where moves are often not intuitive and depend on engine backed ...


6

In chess, like other sports we go through many falls to eventually find our balance and improve. Just like everyone goes through many falls before learning how to ride a bike. And then we want to be able to ride without our hands, well, that'll again take a good dozen of falls before we eventually master it, and this keeps happening at any juncture we ...


6

I've been a "life-long beginner" - my USCF rating hovered around 900 for years and years, and just playing OTB chess wasn't helping to improve my ability because I was losing almost every game, for years (though usually against players rated much higher than me, so it didn't affect my rating much). It was a long time before I made even a minimal plan to ...


5

The English GM Glenn Flear has coined the phrase "not quite an endgame" or NQE to describe exactly the kind of positions you talk about. He has written a book, "Practical Endgame Play - Beyond the Basics: The Definitive Guide to the Endgames That Really Matter" about these. It covers NQEs where each player has pawns and only two pieces. Unfortunately it is ...


5

If you're familiar with LaTeX (or if you're willing to learn it, which in my opinion is time well spent), there are some user-created packages which exist just for that. These are very easy to download (e.g. via with the MiKTeX Package Manager) and use. To my knowledge, the most extensive and well-documented of these packages for creating chessboards is ...


5

It absolutely makes sense to study Morphy. Sure, most of his opponents were "terrible" but so are most of your opponents. And, let's be honest, so are you, at the moment. Studying Morphy's games – and tactics in general – will teach you how to beat "terrible" opponents. At your level, nearly all games are decided by exactly the sort ...


5

In regular tournaments both players write the moves down and play with clocks to make sure both players have the same amount of time for their moves. It is normal after the game for the players to analyze the game. They can do this easily because they have written the moves down. When I lose in a tournament I almost always ask my opponent if they would like ...


5

It sounds like you simply crave some human contact in chess, and that is understandable, oh, and much more fun. Starting a club, or getting involved in state chess "politics" is certainly one way, but it is a much bigger undertaking with more responsibility. Think hard about this commitment before you do this. Helping kids at a school, possibly your child'...


5

First, you need to get some experience. Go to a chess club if you can and if not, go play some games on the Internet. For your first games, I'd suggest you to play only with what you know right now. After every game, review it and think about what you could have done better (by yourself, not with engine assistance) Later on, it won't be necessary to review ...


5

I am going to answer yes, you should spend most [90%] of your time on tactics. Provided that this is done in the right way. There are different kinds of tactics for different reasons. Tactics in the endgame aim to queen a pawn, unless there are no pawns left which changes the aim to checkmate or forcing a drawn position. Tactics in the middlegame are ...


4

Can anyone tell me why variant chess is supposed to be bad for your game? No, they can't because it's not bad for your game. I have not seen any visible problem in my games So where do you get the crazy idea that it is bad for your chess? But in my chess club we are usually discouraged from playing such chess Your club is obviously very ...


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