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17

There's another famous quote you need to pair with "Chess is 90% tactics." Spielmann was reported to remark, after hearing one too many people exclaiming about an Alekhine combination, "I could find those combinations myself, just as easily, if I had his positions. But I never get those positions!" And that's the rub. The game-winning tactics you see in the ...


4

Just for reference here is what I know: How to set up the board How the pieces move How Castling works How Check/Checkmate works Other basic rules needed to play at a beginner level That's a good start. The next thing you need to know is how to win a won game. That starts with learning the basic checkmates. So you need to learn how to ...


3

The statement is probably correct, but dangerous if taken the wrong way. Tactics are born out of strategy, and, during the game, you might be spending 90% of your time trying to find those tactics, but it will be fruitless if your strategic plan sucks. It should not mean that you must be spending 90% of your time studying tactics. Strategy comes first, if ...


2

The important point here is knowing what initiative is and recognizing when you have it. To me, initiative is not just making your opponent make forced moves by, e.g., chasing the Q up the board with a couple of minor pieces where in the end the Q settles on a nice square but your pieces are uncoordinated and sit in useless spots. As soon as that happens, ...


1

If you track why you lose, where you missed a win, what stage (opening, middle, ending) etc. it will help you know what you need to spend the most time on. As most have said, that will probably be tactically for a lot of your games at the beginning. But if you keep track of it, then you might find you lose in longer calculation in the ending, as opposed to ...


1

You don't mention whether you prefer studying chess with books or at the computer, so I'll toss a couple of ideas at you for both. Books Russia Chess House has some good beginning tactics books (Chess School 1a and 1b) with a thousand or so basic positions, showing some elementary checkmates and basic tactics. They make a pretty good starting out resource, ...


1

When I reached 1900 I rebuilt my game from the ground up starting with the endgame, then middle-game and then openings.


1

First, develop your pieces quickly in the opening. Second, look to gain time. A lot of times people will exchange or move a piece back when that piece is attacked but if you can defend it by developing a piece you are gaining time. For example the line, 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Na5 6. Bb5+ Bd7 7. Qe2 white is defending the bishop by ...


1

Yes, to an extent. It's best to learn openings chronologically. If you're just starting out you should look at the era before Morphy. As you get better you can look at more modern openings. Doing it that way way you can see how the ideas build on the previous generation's ideas. Tal is probably most appropriate for the 1800-2200 range.


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