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35

This position is a draw, the game is over. It is not possible for either side to checkmate the other from this position, not even if the side with the bare king would try to help. The same is true for king and knight vs king. A single knight or bishop without any pawns or other pieces is not enough to win the game. With king and two knights vs king it is in ...


16

Playing Kg2 in this position would "put your king in check" in that the black king is attacking that square already. So, no, that would be an illegal move. The fastest way to checkmate in this position would be Qd4 (forcing the black king to move to h2) followed by Qh4#.


12

The answer depends on whether or not the games are being recorded. The way this is elliptically referenced in the FIDE Laws of Chess is that a distinction is made between, on the one hand, standard time controls (where moves must be recorded by the players), rapid and blitz games played at a sufficiently high level that there are enough arbiters to record ...


10

Stalemate Stalemate is a situation in the game of chess where the player whose turn it is to move is not in check but has no legal move. ... In popular usage, the word stalemate refers to a conflict that has reached an impasse, and in which resolution or further action seems highly difficult or unlikely. In the above position, your opponent had no legal ...


9

Answer 1: Yes, this is possible. Here is an example game in 27 moves: [FEN ""] 1. a4 a5 2. b4 b5 3. bxa5 bxa4 4. Rxa4 Nc6 5. g4 Nxa5 6. Rxa5 Rxa5 7. h4 g5 8. hxg5 h5 9. gxh5 d5 10. c4 Nf6 11. cxd5 Nxd5 12. e4 Bb7 13. exd5 Bxd5 14. Nc3 e6 15. Nxd5 exd5 16. Bg2 c5 17. Bxd5 Rxh5 18. d4 Rxg5 19. dxc5 Bxc5 20. f4 Bxg1 21. Rxg1 f6 22. fxg5 fxg5 23. ...


9

Don't try this at home. ;-) First of all, a simple LiChess search gives this is B12 Caro-Kann Defense: Advance Variation, Tal Variation, i.e. it has even a name and is legit. Second, 8 games listed, with IMs playing it, so it's still rare. Third, standard Black move is Kb8. He doesn't even try to immediately throw everything except the kitchen sink at the ...


8

Yes, it can, as long as the opposing piece is not protected. It's even possible when the king is in check; all that matters is the position after the piece is captured. If there is an opposing piece attacking the king, the move is illegal; if not, it's legal. [FEN "kR6/2B5/8/8/8/8/6r1/6nK b - - 0 1"] [startflipped ""] 1... Ka7 {This is ...


6

If you look closely, the bishop only attacks on squares of a specific color (in this case, it's a light square bishop). As long as the opponent king steps on dark squares, it's impossible to 'check'mate the opponent king. During the endgame with very few pawns on the board, it is most likely best to sacrifice your piece for an opponent's pawn, as they have ...


6

No. The whole point of the game, the way you win, is by checkmating the opponent's king. If your opponent could exchange the king for another piece then you would no longer be able to win. In any case, all the pieces except the pawns can move backwards. Without promotion any pawn which reached the 8th rank and couldn't promote would no longer be able to move....


5

Yes- if they captured your queen, then it would count as them going into check: (from this, ironically listed as a "Related" question here) Besides making sense, it's also explicitly stated in the rules of the game: 3.9 The king is said to be 'in check' if it is attacked by one or more of the opponent's pieces, even if such pieces are constrained ...


4

The side to move first in KQ vs KQ wins in 41.75% of the positions. That's because the side to move first gets the first check, which is often decisive in these major-piece endgames - compare how many KQQ vs KQQ positions, which ostensibly have equal material, are won by the side to move first (83%). Caveat: "positions" here refers to all legal ...


3

There are various positions that matter for pawn endgames. Often both sides promote to queen and then the side that moves first still wins. This can happen right after promotion, when the king of the stronger side is close by. Some examples: [FEN "8/1KP1q3/8/8/3k4/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1.Kb8?? {Ka8 is correct} Kc5! 2.c8=Q+ Kb6 {And white can't prevent ...


3

Chaturanga is a local variant played by Indian traders. This variant was created only 1400 yrs ago from ShadYantra or ShatRanjan (not Shatranj).. In older version Board Castling happened in real but not like Rook King exchange. KING possesses scepter or RaajDand, symbolized by cross sign in kings position.. In indian Castling, king had to consult any Royal ...


3

I was reading through "American Chess Magazine Volume 1" on Google Books, which is from 1897. There is an old article on the origins of chess therein, with the basic summary of how the game to be: it's reminiscent of today's Wikipedia as it was at the time. To my surprise, on page 264, there was direct mention of what you speak of! It occurs when ...


2

Yes, a piece can check even if it can't move because of a pin. This is explicitly written in the FIDE Laws of Chess (emphasis added): 3.9.1 The king is said to be 'in check' if it is attacked by one or more of the opponent's pieces, even if such pieces are constrained from moving to the square occupied by the king because they would then leave or place ...


2

You are in checkmate if you are in check and have no legal move by which to escape it. In this case you cannot escape check by moving your king. B4 or D4 would leave you in check from the knight, C4 would leave you in check from the bishop and anything on rows 2 or 3 would leave you in check from a rook. However moving your king is not the only way to escape ...


2

Generally, when asking how to win a game, you will ask for a particular player. For example, you can ask: How can White win this game? In fact, that seems to be what you are really asking here. However, this position is a dead position: neither player can achieve checkmate through legal moves, no matter how badly the other player plays. Under FIDE (World ...


2

In a pawn and king vs king endgame, key squares are those that guarantee a win. If the pawn is on e3 for example, the key squares for white are d5, e5, and f5. Critical squares (I think) are those where the king must get to promote the pawn (e.g., d7 or f7).


2

Unless there is some forced sequence that leads to mate or either side losing the queen, King+Queen vs King+Queen will be an easy draw with correct play.


2

I am reading Fundamental Chess Endings by Karsten Muller and Frank Lamprecht as well. As others mentioned, there is an implied difference between critical squares and key squares. My two cents is that critical squares are relative to opponent pieces but key squares are relative to the game. Squares are critical squares to some of my opponent pieces (e.g. ...


1

What you are describing is what is known as a "stalemate", a situation in the game of chess where the player whose turn it is to move is not in check but has no legal move. Moving the king into check is not a legal move. This is one of the ways a chess game is drawn.


1

Various authors have used the terms key squares and critical squares differently. In some places Muller & Lamprecht's explanation is only fair. The confusion is that these terms have been used for two concepts. The first is the square the attacking king must occupy to queen his pawn in a K vs K-P endgame. This is well described above. The second concept ...


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