14

In the vast majority of the cases, 4....d6 and 4....0-0 transpose into each other. However, with 4....0-0 black keeps the option of playing c6 and d5. Recently, this idea has been played by GM Jobava, known for his original approach in the opening: Lupulescu-Jobava, So-Jobava and Vitiugov-Jobava. About the last game, chess.com comments "Just giving away ...


10

The most common way to end up with queenside castling for white in the KID is via the Saemisch Variation 5.f3. Black often attacks on the kingside in the KID, and the Saemisch is typically a way to avoid that, and ideally to attack on the kingside oneself. Of course, whole books have been written about what's going on in this variation, and I don't play ...


9

In all the Indian Defenses, in general, Black allows White to occupy the centre with his pawns. Nonetheless, in Nimzo-Indian and Queen's Indian Defense Black has many moves to attack White's pawn centre very early in the game, thus White cannot gain too much space. King's Indian Defense (and Gruenfeld Defense), on the other side, really do not care that ...


8

It is good to think more concretely here. After move like e5 three things can happen. White can take on e5, white can play d5 or black will one day play exd4 himself. Taking on e5 never wins a pawn and creates a hole on d4. For good reason not very popular With d5 your bishop is now bad, but the position for black is good, easy and funny to play. An attack ...


8

No, you cannot force white to play c4 and end up in a KID. However, if you want to avoid the Pirc, you have several options after 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3. ... d5 is the most popular and you usually end up in easy to play positions. E.g. you can fianchetto your bishop to g7, attack the center with c5, etc.. You need to be prepared for the Hübsch/Blackmar-Diemer ...


8

Elo points don't matter. Just play what opening you feel comfortable with most. If you play it well intuitively, then go ahead.


8

Chess engines are currently not able to give you a good analysis of opening moves all by themselves. This is basically due to the huge number of possible variations during the opening phase. Engines are effectively limited to a certain depth and if the potential positions some 10-20 moves later are still roughly equal you cannot decide on a best move. ...


8

It may be to the fact that you are making his bad Bishop into a Monster. After 6...c5, 7. d5 Nh5! and the dark square bishop is free to roam. [FEN "rnbq1rk1/pp2ppbp/3p2p1/2pP3n/2P2B2/4PN2/PP1N1PPP/R2QKB1R w KQ - 1 8"]


8

It is simply not as solid as other openings, mostly because it cedes too much space, and especially with the advent of computers: White has simply found more ways to press black. In a 2017 interview, Magnus Carlsen did not think too highly of it. "If he had wanted a worse position, he would have played the King’s Indian," Carlsen said. Nevertheless, it ...


7

According to the Game Database of ChessTempo, after 6.Be3, there are 3 main variations: 6....e5: 1970 games 6....Nc6: 1651 games 6....c5: 1335 games After 6....e5 white's main moves are 7.d5 and 7.Nge2. After 7.d5 black has two options: 7....c6 (counterplay on the queen side) or 7....Nh5 8.Qd2 f5 (counterplay on the king side). After 7.Nge2 black's most ...


7

There is a general principle that says that, in positions with a blocked center, every side must attack in the direction where his own pawn chain points to. For example, in the KID, sometimes White has pawns in e4 and d5 (White's pawn chain) and Black has pawns in d6 and e5 (Black's pawn chain). So we see that White's pawn chain points to the queenside, ...


7

If you want to play c4 against the King's Indian, it's better to go "all in" by having your e-pawn on e4 (so playing a main line against the KID). With the pawn on e3 you're sort of dipping your toe in the water with c4. It's not nearly as effective. There's also an important tactical reason for why c4 is bad (probably why Stockfish gave -1). After 6...c5, ...


6

According to Joe Gallagher-Starting Out The King's Indian Defense and David Vigorito-Attacking Chess-The King's Indian Volume 2 the most solid line for White in King's Indian is the Fianchetto variation. I tend to agree with it. Before explaining why, let me just show you the tabya so I can better explain my point of view : [Title "KID, the Fianchetto ...


6

Attacking/Defending the empty house This is going to be a long answer that will require several edits to complete, but I wanted there to be an answer started. Not moving a pawn in front of the king leads it to be vulnerable to back rank mates. Moving a pawn in front of the king (making luft) creates holes that can be exploited (particularly by knights). ...


6

In many cases, openings are named after a notable first master game (or games). The master or country does not necessarily must have contributed to it. Apparently in the case of Indian openings (1. d4 Nf6), they are named after Moheschunder Bannerjee. See the Wikipedia article on Indian defence.


6

The reason for playing ...Nh5 is to have the option of playing ...Nf4, where ...exf4 would unleash his usually bad KID bishop. Case in point is the Bayonet Attack: [FEN ""] [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "?"] [Round "?"] [White "?"] [Black "?"] [Result "*"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. b4 The main move ...


6

I don't think the problem is with any c4 in this type of position altogether. I think that if you go for a line like 5.c4 and 6.Nc3 your position is just OK. The particular position you post is maybe a different story as the knight is a bit misplaced on d2 (this leaves the d4 pawn a bit exposed. Many of the moves suggested are right, and exploit this fact ...


6

You do not say why you lose: Are you being beaten positionally, or are your opponents successfully attacking your king? This a VERY difficult question to answer since it is such a large opening to cover (the Vassilios Kotronias books on the King's Indian from Quality Chess are 5 volumes!). Basically, what you are looking to do is play on the queenside, ...


5

Short answer - no. Plenty of strong grandmasters like Radjabov and Caruana still play it. Latest games


5

They are indeed similar in some ways; as you have noted, the kingside structure that gives the variations their names are identical to each other, and there are some similar themes, such as a kingside attack. A comparison between them provides a great example of the general difference between White openings and Black openings. Black in the King's Indian ...


5

I agree with magd that 6.Be3 c5 is a hot line right now. And if you are scared to sacrifice a pawn, maybe the king's indian is not for you. And of course: The king's indian is a very complex opening. There are no easy solutions. Only working through books and GM-games will equip you with the ability to play these positions well and with confidence. That ...


5

won that game, but I feel like I got lucky. I blundered in this game. I feel that letting white capture my rook on a8 was a blunder Everything you said was correct. Also what if white captured g4 then I have to capture e4 with my knight. White then captures my rook at a8. I don't see any compensation for black for the lost of material. Again, I agree ...


5

After 6....e5 the centre usually gets closed with white playing d5. This closed centre helps black in his kingside attack with f5, g5, ... The dark squared bishop sometimes goes to f8 from where it helps to support the d6 pawn which can get weak if white attacks on the queenside. The positions after c5 are completely different resembling the Sicilian ...


5

I found the games, and you have to take them with a grain of salt since one was between a 2150, and someone who was not even FIDE rated. The second was between two 2360's, which I find a bit suspicious. I am going to post that second game. I can tell you the basic ideas behind each move, but I am not sure that they were strung together in an optimal manner. ...


4

No, there is nothing wrong with this approach for Black. A kingside fianchetto is a perfectly reasonable response to White's. You are likely to end up transposing to an actual King's Indian if White eventually plays c4, in which White's fianchetto is a fine setup but not a killer.


4

The Petrosian system ( 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2 e5 7.d5) is relatively high in strategy and low in tactics (for a King's Indian).


4

I think a good way of preventing Black's kingside play is the Makogonov (or Makagonov) variation: [fen ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.h3 This is more strategical than tactical, and most of the times prevents Black's ..f5 by playing g4 with White! Not to attack, but to restrain. After 5..0-0 you can choose: either a setup with 6.Nf3, or first ...


4

One of the books of the "Move By Move" series is about the Torre Attack. It's written by IM Palliser and published in 2012, so it's still relatively recent. Digging up old games is definitely a good idea when studying an opening, but you can also find interesting material from recent games. This year, Kramnik played the Torre Attack against the King's ...


4

In the Bayonet line speed is critical. White wants to crush on the queenside, Black wants to crush on the Kingside and mate. Every move must either accelerate your plan or slow your opponents plan. Ideally it will do both. I disagree with your assessment. Black's attack is coming and plays itself by pawnstorm. White cannot stop it, White can only slow ...


3

In Indian Chess, the game that was played in the 18th, 19th and early 20d centuries in India (not to be confused with its ancestor Chaturanga), the rules allowed no castle, but : The king can make a knight's move once in a game, known as Indian castling. As a consequence, g3 followed by Kg2 for White or ...b6 followed by ...Kb7 (the black king stands on ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible