24

In short, after some investigation, I do not believe that white was a 2200 player is the real answer. First, I found it odd that it says he was exactly 2200. This is the only tournament I can find that he ever played, and it was an Olympiad, which had to be FIDE rated. He was also from Brazil, which was not a strong chess region in the world at that time. It ...


17

White (Rigaud) did not have a Fide rating. Until 1981, the Fide rating floor was 2200, which means that any rated player had at least 2205 and that non-rated players taking part in a Fide-rated event were given a provisionnal rating of 2200. This is the case of Rigaud in Nice 1974. In other words, 2200 only means that the player was unrated. This was ...


12

We all known that Bobby Fischer has published the famous "A Bust to The King's Gambit", where the gambit is said to be losing for white. Why is it so? Is there any line that can secure black an advantage in the opening, assuming best play from white? It is not refuted but the Modern variation is very "pleasant" for Black at the moment, even though being "...


10

The black threat of Bh4+ is not really ones, white should play Bc4 in this position. Releasing the f1 square for the king after the check on h4. After the check white cannot castle anymore but the bishop on h4 is not very happy, black can't play the g8 Knight and need to spend one more tempo on retreating the bishop. If black don't give the check, white ...


9

King's Gambit is not really a horrible opening. Just after all the theory that has been amassed since Spassky has shown that it loses white's advantage. There are other openings that create a good amount of initiative without the possibility of falling into a losing position.


9

First of all, I should point out that it's actually simplest to avoid the Muzio altogether with Black; i.e. meeting 1 e4 e5 2 f4 exf4 3 Nf3 g5 4 Bc4 with 4...Bg7 (the Hanstein Variation) or 4...Nc6! (transposing to a line of the Bishop's Gambit which is probably favourable for Black. But that doesn't really answer your question, does it? :) After 1 e4 e5 2 ...


9

The King's Gambit has been "refuted" at several points in the past. Most have later been proven incorrect, IIRC only two lines at this point seem suspect. But that's not the point. The point is: how many of your opponents know enough about those lines to play them as accurately as required to win? (John Shaw in his book on the KG noted analyzing one of the ...


9

Well, it is funny that 4.Nc3 is then the most popular move, with 4.d4 a distant second. In practice though, 4.d4 scores a very high 73.3% for white, compared to only a typical 56.7% for 4.Nc3. In addition, Stockfish much prefers 4.d4, and it is not even close (-.54 to +.92). I will take that big center, and get my pawn back with an open f-file any day. The ...


8

I think your first step toward improvement has to be: don't just lose material. 11.g4 is the first example I see. There seems no rhyme nor reason for just letting the opponent have that pawn. Next is 14.Rf1. There seem to be reasonable ways to not lose the h4 pawn. And finally 15.Ng3 dropping a whole piece on h3, when 15.Bg2 would have saved it. Why keep ...


8

1. e4 e5 2. f4 d5 is known as the Falkbeer Countergambit. However, 3.fxe5?? is not a variation but a blunder. As Wikipedia explains, you will either lose material after 3...Qh4+, 4.g3 Qxe4+ (due to a fork between the King and the Rook), or expose your King to the black pieces after 3...Qh4+, 4.Ke2 Qxe4+ 5.Kf2 Bc5+. I am not aware of a name for 1. e4 e5 2....


8

I am not sure what you are asking. This is not a question of any eco or opening but rather of tactics which you were missing. After Nxc3+ (discovered check), you lose the queen and basically the game. There are two main themes in this game: pin: of the knight on c3 by the bishop on b4; Therefore the pawn on e4 is not protected anymore as you cannot move ...


8

My initial reaction is that 3...c5 is very weak just by looking at it, which is why it is so rare. The ECO key that comes with ChessBase's Mega databases is very detailed, but even this does not even have its own specific sub-key. There are 112 games in Mega 2020 database with 3...c5. The most popular response, played in 87 of the 112 games was 4.Bc4, which ...


7

4…e4 should actually be the least attractive option for black. But you should probably know a bit about it: [Title "Falkbeer Countergambit"] [fen "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1. e4 e5 2. f4 d5 3. exd5 e4 4. d3 Nf6 5. dxe4 Nxe4 6. Nf3 Bc5 7.Qe2! Bf2 8. Kd1 Qxd5 9.Nfd2! The checks 7…Bf2 and 8…Qd5 look threatening, but now ...


7

In this position, 4. Bc4 is played the most. It continues White's development, and 4. Bc4 makes room for the king on f1 (which isn't a bad square, at least not any more than h4 is a bad square for the black bishop). E.g. after 4. Nc3, Black can play the nasty 4... Bh4+, forcing the king to move to e2. The calm 4. Be2 works as well, but I feel it is less in ...


7

About the second line, 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d6: This line is known as the King's Gambit, Fischer defense. One thing it isn't is "ignoring your gambit" - Black is stopping you from playing Ne5 after the well-known Black maneuver ...g5-g4 in the King's gambit main lines. The most common line now is 4. d4, when 4...g5 5. h4 g4 forces White to play 6. Ng1 (...


6

It depends a little. The Queen's Gambit can lead to very lively play, if both parties are willing, but it's easier to turn it positional, as the Queen's Gambit is more of a "pseudo-gambit" than the King's Gambit; White will almost always be able to regain his pawn if it's taken, even without going all out for blood. The King's Gambit is different. White ...


6

Spassky did not play it "often" and you'll notice he also didn't play it in any of his 3 world championship matches. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=21136 Black can very quickly equalize, for example 2...Bc5 or 2...exf4 3.Nf3 d5. Among many others. Black can also try to maintain his opening advantage with lines like 3.Nf3 d6, among others. In ...


6

Your objective assessment of White's position after 6. Ng1 is quite on the mark. A. Objectively speaking... It's hard to see how this position could be good for White. On the plus side - White has a good center. Black's pawn on f4 is weak. Black's kingside is a bit loose. On the minus side - White is a pawn down at the moment. White's own ...


6

David Bronstein, in his book "The Modern Chess Self-Tutor," gives an interesting explanation for not playing it. Don't forget, he's used it many times in GM practice, including memorable games against Tal and Petrosian (the latter was an exhibition game in which they explore more fully an idea from an Alekhine-Keres game). His reasoning for 2. Nf3 being ...


6

From my analysis, the line you give appears to be the best way White can play. After 9.Qd2, Stockfish 10 at depth 28 gives roughly +1. So I think it qualifies as a refutation of 3...h5. I couldn't find any games where 6.Ng5 was played, but I did find a game that reached the same position on move 6 via transposition. The game was from 1788 (!) in the "London ...


6

White's f4 sacrifices a pawn for rapid development and the possibility of an attack against the uncastled black king. c5 as a response from black addresses none of the issues in his position and just wastes a move making the gambit all the more effective. White's plan remains on track - Bc4, O-O, win the pawn back on f5 and smash through on f7.


6

The inclusion of 2. Nc3 ahead of f2-f4 is most significant. Consider 1. e4 e5 2. f4. Does 2. f4 aid White's development? Does 2. f4 make a threat? In both cases, no. 1. e4 e5 2. f4 isn't a threat because if we gave White an additional move for 3. fxe5, then 3...Qh4+ ruins White's day. That's the first reason for 2. Nc3: by guarding e4, it means f2-f4 will ...


5

I think Jonathan Garber's comment about trying to gain time against the Black queen after 6...Qxd5 7.Nc3 accurately describes what one motivation for 6.Bxd5 can be, though I also think that Black happens to have nothing to worry about in that regard. While she is temporarily behind in development, she shouldn't have any troubles completing her development, ...


5

4.Bc4 is a good move here. The line usually worried about, the bishop check 4...Bh4+, often leads to a line with strong, aggressive chances for White. Sacrificing pawns and using black's pawn for protection, 4...Bh4+ 5. g3 fxg3 6. 0-0 gxh2 7. Kh1 gives's White's king surprisingly strong safety as well as piece development and attacking chances.


5

Anyone can make a mistake. Masters don't make many that are this bad this early in the game, but it does happen. I don't agree with your statement that this game demonstrates that White "lack[s] the very basics of opening principles". He traded a wing pawn for a center pawn, which is very much in line with opening principles. It's just that the move loses ...


4

Just my totally subjective opinion. Seems to me that at sub-master level - the goal is to have fun and enjoy the thrills and chills of the game. So why not play King's Gambit as well as all the other gambits ? Accept that you might get blasted off the board - but you might equally wind up getting some sudden inspiration and doing the same to your opponent. ...


4

One item that is not a reason that the King's Gambit isn't played more at the international level is this specious article from Chessbase News: "Busting the King's Gambit, this time for sure." In the article, Vasik Rajlich, the author of Rybka, claims that all moves but 3.Be2 lead to a forced win for Black, while that move draws. However, though this was ...


4

As a regular 3, ... Be7 player, I can say that Be7 is not played to give an immediate check on h4. As others pointed out the best move is 4, Bc4 but white must be aware of the several tactics that could arise in this position. For example after the natural 4. Bc4 attacking the f7 pawn, [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 Be7 4. Bc4 Black would simply ...


4

The opening is called King's Gambit and is usually reached with a slightly different move order after 1.e4 e5 2.f4.... It used to be popular a long time ago (100+ years) for its potential of wild games, but is probably slightly incorrect and not a good choice if your opponent knows what to do. Arguing with general opening principals is not really ...


4

After 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4 Be7 4.Nf3 Bh4+ probably 5.g3!? fxg3 6.0-0 does the job. [fen ""] 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4 Be7 4.Nf3 Bh4+ 5.g3!? fxg3 6.O-O In typical King's gambit style, you're down in material and probably a bit worse with perfect play, but you have great compensation and attacking chances. If Black makes a mistake, they will pay ...


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