9

The f7 pawn is really only a concern for beginners. It is not easy to attack for white with many pieces and is easily defended. Generally (in the opening/middlegame) you want to surround your king with pieces or pawns for protection. Usually you don't want to bind your pieces to the protection of the king as they have other (attacking) duties. This leaves ...


9

Don't try this at home. ;-) First of all, a simple LiChess search gives this is B12 Caro-Kann Defense: Advance Variation, Tal Variation, i.e. it has even a name and is legit. Second, 8 games listed, with IMs playing it, so it's still rare. Third, standard Black move is Kb8. He doesn't even try to immediately throw everything except the kitchen sink at the ...


6

No, absolutely not. You are putting your king in check first from the Qd5. If you think about this way: Who could take the other king first since that really is what checkmate is? In this case, Kxg2 Qxg2 captured the white king first, and only after would Bxg8 take the black king...White lost the king first. Your thought also does not hold up to logic: ...


5

With rook on g1, 13. gxh5 gives it a direct open file against the king. Wrong! The black king is not on the g file. It is on the h file and the rook on f8 is ready, if required, to come to g8 and fight for the open file. g5 allowed 13... Bg4, necessitating 14. Rxg4, an exchange sacrifice for the attack to continue. Again, wrong. 13... Bg5 14 Rxg4 hxg4 ...


5

It's a very general question, no concrete examples (where you struggle to defend) are provided in your post, and as such one cannot really answer meaningfully. However, here are some rough hints that might help you: Pawn structure is a key factor in king safety. Any pawn move commitments on the side you've castled should be taken into account with extreme ...


4

Apart from very obvious advice, e.g. an early castling. Believe me, I know my castling well. The first thing to note is that early castling is only recommended to complete beginners and in positions where the center is open. Castling too early in closed or semi-closed positions can be catastrophic. It is often wise to wait until you see which side your ...


4

Can someone explain to me why castling is so important for king safety? Kings are safest behind pawns that have not moved from their starting squares, because it's harder to create open files and diagonals against such a pawn formation. Once pawns have moved forward, they can be attacked more easily by other pawns, which can make them move even more. In ...


1

Giving up castling rights with Queens still on the board can be far more dangerous. Once the Queens are exchanged and the enemy does not have a considerable activity to attack your King, then the pawn structure will have a key role in whether your King will be safe.


1

Most chess activity in the opening is through or related to the centre. With your king still in the centre, you overtly expose him to attack. Castling makes safe your king, in general. Most openings try to get the king safely tucked away ASAP. But many openings delay castling to the edge of safety for the sake of tempo or central play and piece development. ...


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