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1

First, Bg4 isn't threatening anything. If I play 6. 0-0 and you play 6...Bg4 and then I give you a free move-Show me what the threat is. There isn't any. Second, h3 wastes a move for white that could be used to improve his position. Third, you shouldn't assume that pins are bad. White can often play gxf3 which opens the g-file for attack and reinforces the ...


2

I don't know there's a book that covers all of those openings well. The Pinski book tries to but I don't think they do a good job. My favorite book on the Evans is Harding's book. The two knights can go in a lot of different directions so you might look into how you want to play it first. The Giuoco Piano and modern bishop's opening may look similar but are ...


12

You're referring to ...Bc8-g4 as a threat. The only threat it makes is ...Bg4xf3, losing time and the bishop pair. While White has d4 under wraps with a pawn at c3, theere's no ...Nc6-d4 coming to pressure the pinned knight. The f6-knight has to move to a lesser square to prepare ...Qd8-f6, which is nothing because Nb1-d2 is right at hand to prevent a ...


0

There's a huge difference between this and the Evans gambit and that is 3...Nf6 followed by 0-0 at some point. In the Evans gambit, you usually aren't going to have an easy way to Nf6 without giving something else up which means you're going to struggle to castle which means you are vulnerable to a strong attack. Here, you just throw Nf6 out on move 3 and ...


-3

You can't. This is what you get for playing so passively at move 2 (2...Nc6 is a master-class move. Masters can play more patiently in waiting for counterattacks, but inexpert players should learn to hit back whenever they can. In this case, 2...d5, 2...Nf6, 2...f5.) and at move 3 (3...Bc5, instead of 3...Nf6 4 Ng5 Bc5, of which no other stackexchange user ...


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