19

Probably, as you pointed out, Bb5 instead of Bc4. The Ruy Lopez is considered very very marginally better/more critical than the Italian by humans, so it'd make sense that the engine used here'd agree. Certainly, however, the Italian is fine, and the difference is very marginal.


16

The joke is based on the perception of Giri as a very solid, "drawish" player. There always seems to be one top player who is the butt of such jokes. It used to be Leko, nowadays it's Giri. Take a look at this reddit thread for example or this chess24 April's fool. The swashbuckling Evan's is the last opening Giri would ever choose to play, or so the ...


16

Generally speaking, violating positional elements, at any time, is bad for positional understanding. When you win a lot of games with bad positional play, this provides positive reinforcement for playing badly. This opening, often called the Black Bear of the Philidor, isn't really breaking the opening principles. Black has gained space on the kingside, ...


15

I'm discounting the explanation he just made an error in his annotations because of the deliberate way he looks at the camera when he announces this First of all, he did make a mistake. He said Giri played the Evans Gambit but Giri was black. The Evans Gambit is an opening played by white. The opening is sound and is occasionally played at the top ...


13

I'd say the opposite is true. "Principles" are great as general rules, but if chess were about following a set of fixed rules, you could simply buy a book that contains those rules and become a Grandmaster after you've finished it. But that's definitely not the case. Chess is a game of exceptions. Learning about this opening will help you find ...


12

22...Rd2 saves the queen, but black is still down a massive amount of material. After white takes the rook on d2, he has two rooks for just a bishop. With such a huge material deficit, there is no possible hope of defending with normal play. The only chance for black would be to have an immediate attack on the king or other very strong compensation, which is ...


12

You're referring to ...Bc8-g4 as a threat. The only threat it makes is ...Bg4xf3, losing time and the bishop pair. While White has d4 under wraps with a pawn at c3, theere's no ...Nc6-d4 coming to pressure the pinned knight. The f6-knight has to move to a lesser square to prepare ...Qd8-f6, which is nothing because Nb1-d2 is right at hand to prevent a ...


11

The Evans Gambit is a running gag on Agadmator's channel. I can't remember when it started but at least for the past year whenever there is a game that reaches the Giuoco Piano position he jokes about white going for the Evans Gambit, a very exciting opening which—to Antonio's dismay it would seem—is played extremely rarely in modern high level chess.


9

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 d6: 365chess.com database shows: MOVE | games | year | White + Draw + Black -------+-------+------+--------+--------+------- 4. d4 | 491 | 2018 | 50.3 % | 24.4 % | 25.3 % 4. c3 | 359 | 2018 | 53.5 % | 20.6 % | 25.9 % 4. d3 | 357 | 2018 | 45.4 % | 22.7 % | 31.9 % 4. h3 | 323 | 2016 | 42.7 % | 25.7 % | 31.6 % 4. Nc3 | ...


9

The game will get the characteristics of the Philidor Defense rather than the Italian Game. Wikipedia calls it the Semi-Italian Opening. I. A. Horowitz called the defence "solid", also writing: "It does not seem quite sufficient for equality." The Wikipedia article notes several possible continuations for White, with 4. d4 probably the best bet for ...


8

4.Ng5 is a provocative move, threatening to take on f7. The main line is 4...d5, and after 5.exd5 the best move might be 5...Na5. After 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 Black has sacrificed a pawn but has gained a slight lead in development. If instead you play 5...Nxd5, White will often play 6. Nxf7 Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6, known as the Fried Liver. White has a very good ...


8

c3 by white is called the Moller Attack. The reason you do not see it at high levels is that the sting has been taken out of it over the years. Basically, it comes down to breaking up the center with Nxe4, or hitting back in the center with d5, before white can finish developing and fortify the center. There are a few lines you need to know. [FEN ""] 1. ...


8

After White's 22. Bc1, it seems like responding with Rd2 would keep the game alive for Black. This is an entirely wrong assumption. Black has no counterplay whatsoever, while White holds the initiative. Being down material, Black has no resources/time to repel the coming attack, nor to organize a defense/counterplay. Because his queen is trapped he will be ...


8

3...h6 is not a mistake, but it's certainly not the best move in the position. In the opening, one of your goals is to develop your pieces, and ...h6 doesn't do this. The only point of ...h6 seems to be to avoid the line 3...Nf6 4.Ng5, but this line is not dangerous to black at all. Play can continue 4...d5 5.exd5 Na5, and black will have good compensation ...


6

I'd explain nothing about openings to a 6 year old, except maybe something about using all your pieces (but it'll fall to deaf ears, most likely). I assisted at a local school tournament recently, where players of about seven had a lot of trouble playing legal moves, or checkmating their opponent when being up almost everything. Checkmate is often not ...


6

"That is, from an experienced player's viewpoint, why do we assume that staying alive with Rd2 is not worth the effort, and how would White be sure to win regardless?" I don't want to speak for you but it seems you're getting more at a philosophical question about whether or not to resign than asking about the position. For an under 1200 section, this ...


6

I think that he is just kidding because it is so rare at that level, but nevertheless, some great players have whipped it out as a surprise. Kasparov played it three times against Jeroen Piket, Vishy Anand in classical, and Nigel Short in rapid, beating Piket and Anand, and drawing Short. Morozevich played it once and lost to Kamsky in 2008, but Nakamura ...


6

FM Andrey Terekhov's Two Knights Defense repertoire on Chessable uses this variation against 4.d3. That repertoire deserves to be more widely known: it's one of the best on Chessable, the author updates it frequently, and it's free! In the introductory text of 4.d3 h6 he notes: In the beginning, this line has been mostly used as a surprise weapon, but in ...


5

White obviously doesn't want to give light square bishop for knight. He can waste two moves with Bb3-c2, which is the old main line. Or he can just create escape on a2, after which Na5 doesn't make much sense. It gains space while it doesn't have to be so bad to exchange the bishop after Be6, if it didn't make additional moves.


5

Let us start with the Italian game. Although it was long long ago since I was playing this opening, there are good reasons why it is not played anymore. The main reason it is not popular any more is the failure of the Moeller attack: [fen ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4 7.Nc3 Nxe4 8.O-O Bxc3 9.d5 Bf6 10.Re1 Ne7 11....


4

After f6 White takes with the bishop and Black loses a piece (bishop on c5 since d6 square is attacked by the white knight and f8 is attacked by the white pawn; no other piece is protecting the bishop).


4

Even though Black is fine in this line (if you know the relevant theory), you can avoid it by playing the 3...Nf6 move order. Then: 4.d3 Bc5 transposes to a quiet Italian where White won't be pushing an early d4. 4.Nc3 Bc5 transposes to the Four Knights. There are some active moves White can play against 3...Nf6 to avoid transposing into standard systems ...


4

This line looks unsound. White's plan seems to be to threaten to win back the piece by 10...dxc4 11. Re1 (pinning the knight), teasing Black into weakening his king's position further by 11...f5 to defend e4, which then leads to a very complicated situation that White hopes to manage better. However, Black is fine if he just lets go of the knight, since he'...


3

I see two reasons why to prefer castling over c3. First reason why I would go for 4.0-0 is that I would like to postpone playing c3 to make lines with d5 riskier. Imagine Marshall Ruy-Lopez, if the pawn was on c2, white would have very easy life, no weakness on d3, Nc3 possibility. And you can always play the c3 later if you like. The second thing may be ...


3

There is no way to "crush" that move. You just play! Develop your pieces, get space in the center and obtain a small advantage. Your opponent won't be losing a piece or something like that. I assume 3...d6 may have some ideas related to a pin on g4 (for instance, 4.d4 Bg4) A c3 pawn advance can be useful to prevent some ...Nd4. I think you'll be fine after ...


3

When I looked for a similar book, the best I could find is this somewhat dated work by Jan Pinski. This newer book by Glenn Flear apparently contains 88 pages about the italian, Evan's gambit and two knights. If you have played the Bishop's opening before maybe this is the book for you: It advocates going into the Italian game by 2.Bc4.


3

As stated in my comment, I don't think this is a puzzle because there is no clear decisive tactical sequences. A good move would be 13...Qe7, putting pressure on the e4 pawn and prepare for ...Bxc3. If White did nothing, Black could then continue with ...Be5 and ...Qf6. Note that it's unlikely a bishop pair can be retained in this position, as White can ...


3

I don't see why you should go for d5. Generally speaking opening lines is beneficial for the side with the rooks. And your pieces will get or already occupy nice active squares without d5. I'm not saying it is necessarily bad, but it strikes me as a plan that can definitely backfire. Just imagine you have an isolated pawn on e5 and white's rooks are lined up ...


3

a2-a4 does quite a few things. First it makes a Square for the Bishop on a2. Restricts b5 from Black on most occasions. a3 move is quite a timid one which loses a tempo even if White decides to play a4 later on. Sometimes the Black's Bishop is on b6 where a4 move attacks it. a2-a4 marks the beginning of Q-side play from White. If you see games of Carlsen ...


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