51

I believe that the game you speak of is the extremely famous Lasker-Thomas match in which Lasker forces Black to accept his queen "sacrifice" on move 11. It is followed by a king hunt in which Black's king is forced to the last rank by White, who then finishes the game with the king giving a discovered check from the unmoved a8 rook. The game is ...


50

In general, a chess set has the king as the tallest piece, followed by queen, bishop, knight, rook and pawn in that order. Notice in the starting position how the piece height decreases smoothly from the centre to the edge. (Also, when buying a chess set, usually the height of the king is given as a guide to the size of the chessmen.) Thus I would say the ...


32

This does sound like the famous game between Edward Lasker (not the world champ) and George Alan Thomas. [FEN ""] [Event "Casual game"] [Site "London ENG"] [Date "1912.10.29"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Edward Lasker"] [Black "George Alan Thomas"] 1. d4 e6 2. Nf3 f5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Bxf6 Bxf6 6. e4 fxe4 7. Nxe4 b6 8. Ne5 O-O 9. Bd3 Bb7 10. Qh5 Qe7 11. ...


21

At first glance, the taller piece with skinnier top would appear to be the King while the shorter, rounder piece would appear to be the Queen. There are a few reasons why this would appear to be the case. The King often has a cross on top and the taller piece with the spike appears to more closely resemble that than the shorter piece, and in some sets the ...


18

There are dozens of problems that illustrate a potential winning moves that instead leads to a draw because of the 50 move rule. One example is the following mate in four published by Léon Loewenton in 1956 : [fen "5KBN/p2ppp1r/1p4pp/b7/RP6/1PP4P/1RpPPPkP/n1B1Q1N1 w - - 0 1"] 1. Nf3 Rg7! 2. Kxg7! (2. Qg1+?? draws) There is an apparent mate in three moves:...


12

It doesn't matter. As long as you and your opponent are in agreement about which one is the king and which one is the queen, it doesn't really matter what they were "supposed" to be. That said, if they're easy to mistake, then you run the risk of someone making a misplay because they got confused about which one is which. Which would be unfortunate. ...


12

I can't find the actual game neither in my database nor at, say, chessgames.com. However, the position appears as puzzle 210 -- with the apt description "Running around like a squirrel in a cage" -- in the book 1000 Checkmate Combinations by Victor Henkin, and there it is attributed to a game Aleksandrov-Zaitsev 1974.


9

The piece on the right clearly reminds me of kings from German "Bundesform" piece sets, which are still occasionally used in Germany, although very rarely in tournament play. The left piece does not exactly look like a "Bundesform" queen, but it is still somehow similar.


9

[Title "Carl Ferdinand von Jänisch, Der eiserne Käfig des Tamerlan, 1849"] [FEN "4N3/P2p1Np1/3Qp1R1/2pR4/2p1kpp1/b2bp2B/q3PP2/3K4 w - - 0 0"] 1.f3+ gxf3 2.exd3+ cxd3 3.Bf5+ exf5 4.Re6+ dxe6 5.Nf6+ gxf6 6.Rd4+ cxd4 7.a8=B Qd5 8.Bxd5+ exd5 9.Qe5+ fxe5 10.Ng5# It's problem 59 in Max Lange: Handbuch der Schachaufgaben, Leipzig 1862, p. 79. Google Books. ...


7

I just saw this question, and while someone came up with the game you were looking for, here is a game with what many consider THE most spectacular queen sacrifice ever. It is a positional sacrifice for two minors on move 12! I thought everyone might enjoy this. If you do have never heard of Rashid "SuperNezh" Nezhmetdinov, despite never getting the GM ...


5

Is it this one? [Title "Herbert Grasemann. Deutsche Schachblätter 1950, 2nd Prize"] [StartFlipped "0"] [fen "8/8/8/5B2/6QN/3prp2/3r1p2/3bbk1K w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.Qh3+ Ke2 2.Qf1+ Kxf1 3.Bh3+ Ke2 4.Bf1+ Kxf1 5.Nf5 Ra2 6.Ng3# Dickin & Ebert, in their 100 Classics of the Chessboard, no. 55, call it "Back into Clink". If not, if the bK really is surrounded ...


5

Here's the same set on ebay. More pictures of yours would be helpful. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vtg-Ceramic-Duncan-Medieval-Style-32Pc-Chess-Set-Hand-Painted-Faces-Detailed-74/263416351119?hash=item3d54d6898f:g:GaoAAOSw4A5Y0WX2 Perhaps the seller can help you learn more. If you Google for "ceramic duncan medieval chess", you'll get a lot of hits.


5

Looks like its a stock image: the oldest source of the image I could find from 2008: http://www.grafamania.net/clipart/6201-digital-vision-dv297surreal-business.html


5

I believe this is the position with White to mate in 3: [Title "Tim Krabbé, Schaakbulletin 1972, Mate In 3"] [FEN "8/8/4P3/3p4/2p3p1/1pP1kPPp/1P5P/R3K2R w KQkq - 0 1"] Max Pam found a loophole in the rules, and Tim Krabbé exploited it when he composed this problem in 1972. There are 3 variations depending on Black's responses with the ...


4

According to the Wikipedia variants page, there does not seem to be a variant with a specific name, but there are several variants that use the queen-knight hybrid, which is called an Amazon (appropriate name, and combines rook+bishop+knight movement abilities). So maybe just "Amazon chess" would make sense. The Amazon is used in the following variants (...


4

There are plenty of games that fit the parametres you described, let's see if we get lucky! [Title "Polgar - Chilingriova"] [FEN ""] 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.O-O Bg7 5.c3 e5 6.d4 exd4 7.cxd4 Nxd4 8.Nxd4 cxd4 9.e5 Ne7 10.Bg5 O-O 11.Qxd4 Nc6 12.Qh4 Qb6 13.Nc3 Bxe5 14.Rae1 Bxc3 15.bxc3 Qxb5 16.Qh6 Qf5 17.Qxf8+ 1-0 [Title "Segovia - ...


3

This is hit or miss. No one can really know what puzzle your thinking about, so please don't down vote wrong attempts. People shouldn't be penalized for trying to help. It's only through trial and error we're going to help you find your puzzle. Is this your puzzle: HERE?


3

Some of the colors are a bit different, but that could be age or the nature of being hand painted. Also, you don't say how tall it is. That said, it looks very similar to a Crusaders vs. Saracens set, which has 5 inch tall kings. It is made of "polystone", a material made from crushed stone and polyurethane which is supposed to be durable and provide a heavy ...


2

The closest one that I have found is called celestial strains at: http://www.chess-museum.com/stone--glass-sets.html There are some Polish sets on the site but they are not the same.


2

It's very simple. The piece with the pointy top is the "King". As such, the other piece is the "Queen" by default.


2

Welcome to stackexchange.com, dveim. There's a great answer already, but I think there's a couple of interesting points that I can add. First, in the composition world, there's a convention which states whether the 50 move rule applies by default only to retro-problems. See Chess Problem Codex Article 17. So all these very long "cursed wins" found in the ...


1

The Chess variants site has introduced tags recently and you can find some games with the tag Piece:Amazon. As of the day of writing this answer, the tagging is not yet comprehensive and a lot of games featuring the Amazon are still missed by this but I expect things to improve over time. In addition, there is a list of games with the Amazon in the ...


1

Henrik Juel's three "add pieces" problems listed above (together with a fourth one) are all to be found, together with detailed solutions in PDB, using the query: a='juel' and K='add pieces'. Here is the superb fourth one, with its surprising solution... [Title "Henrik Juel. Probleemblad, 5/1997. Add a unit. What was the last move?"] [FEN ...


1

Although it is not exact match, the style of your set aligns with what is called the St. George style. Compare your set to this image from the Staunton chess set Wikipedia. An article on chess-museum.com provides more information about this style. In comparison to your image, the kings, bishops, queens and pawns builds are extremely similar. The rooks and ...


1

That's a very nice set for display, but if you are interested in playing and maybe even getting better at it as you indicate, you should also investigate obtaining a standard "Staunton" design set since they are the ones normally used in regular play. That provides for uniformity regardless of who and where you play. If you're unfamiliar with that design, ...


1

Other than colors, that looks identical to a set my mother made for me back in the 1970's or early 80's at a local ceramic studio. She made it from molded greenware (unfired clay) and hand painted it. She made a few of these for other chess playing family members & friends, using different color combinations. While the story you state is nice, I'm ...


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