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23

Bobby Fischer did not resign the title, although it may have looked that way. As the New York Times reported at the time: The International Chess Federation stripped Mr. Fischer of his title and gave it to the challenger, Anatoly Karpov of the Soviet Union, because the 32‐year‐old American failed to meet the deadline for formal acceptance of federation ...


22

The character Beth Harmon is purely fictional. The series is based off a book by the same title by Walter Tevis. The author had a tendencie to base books drawing from personal experiences but he wasn't a chess prodigy that's for sure. He was however a good club level player which is why the book has such strong chess knowledge. In that time period, there are ...


21

How would say a 1700 rated player of say 50 years ago who is no longer .around go against a 1700 player of today? Speaking as a player who was around 50 years ago and was rated the equivalent of 1800 in 1973 (my BCF grading was 150 with a generally accepted conversion formula of ELO = BCF x 8 + 600) and is rated 1718 today I'm pretty sure I would beat my 17 ...


21

The official source that people link to when this question comes up is Tim Krabbe's excellent blog post from more than 20 years ago now: The ultimate blunder. He collected every single game in the database (pre 1999) where someone resigned in a winning position and explained the possible reasons behind the resignation for each game as well. Some very famous ...


17

Are there such examples of torturous winning, where a grandmaster resists his urge to resign and lets the opponent take all of his pieces before he gets checkmated? No, there aren't, for the simple reason that that sort of behaviour would require both players to behave in an extremely childish manner and childish behaviour (e.g. "hope chess") is ...


17

A chessgames.com user has made a compilation of consultation games. For example, it contains Lasker / Pillsbury vs Steinitz / Chigorin. According to a comment by user TheFocus, it was "played in St. Petersburg, Russia on January 29, 1896."


16

Everybody seems to agree that "ELO inflation" is real (I found an article from 20 years ago claiming this exists)...except scientists. Here is a 2011 paper that vehemently denies the phenomenon; the abstract says that only little inflation happens, and the players really get better. https://ojs.aaai.org/index.php/AAAI/article/view/7951


16

The raw data which could be used to extract this information is available on the FIDE website (from 2001) and the Olimpbase website (before 2001). What you will need to do is clean the data (the older the data the more "dirty" it is), construct a relational database and insert the data. Then you will be able to use SQL to search the database for ...


15

There is no general rule in naming openings or opening lines in general or gambits. Sometimes it’s the inventor, sometimes the place they lived, they were born, they played the line the first time, and so on. To make it more complicated, openings can have different names in different languages. In German, the Petroff defence is named Russian defence, and ...


14

Not exactly a prize, but answers your question in spirit: Immortal Losing Game Wikipedia's summary of the game is: The Immortal Losing Game is a chess game between the Soviet grandmaster David Bronstein and the Polish International Master Bogdan Śliwa played in 1957 in Gotha. The name is an allusion to the more famous Immortal Game between Adolf Anderssen ...


13

Fischer wanted to play under a first-to-ten-wins format. This was the format of the first world championship match between Steinitz and Zukertort. The argument for this format is that it forces whoever is leading in the match to continue to play for a win. For comparison, in 1972, the Fischer vs. Spassky match was first-to-12.5-points. Therefore once a ...


11

How was the candidate chosen? Very simple. Money. The first to raise the $10,000 stake. And when? As soon as possible. Was it some round robin format? No. First to put $10,000 on the table gets to play the match. Was there no Candidates Tourney at all back then? Correct This is explicitly stated in the Wikipedia article you reference: From 1886 to ...


10

I think the player you are referring to is Yury Dokhoian. According to his FIDE profile and Olimpbase profile he has not played competitive chess since 1994. According to his Wikipedia page he was Kasparov's second for many years and later started working with Karjakin. Chessgames.com has 173 of his games.


10

The Polgar sisters: Training or Genius? by Cathy Forbes states that the main studying was the flash card method. (Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games by (the father)Laszlo Polgar [https://b-ok.cc/book/857033/54e4d4] provides the puzzles on the flashcards.) The most important passage (IMO) is the Judith would continue using the flash cards on her ...


9

The written sources appear to be: An obituary on Bernstein by Edward Lasker (a friend of Bernstein) in the April 1963 issue of Chess Review, which is described in the link below, including a scan of the 1963 article itself: http://jewishchesshistory.blogspot.com/2009/09/alekhine-escaping-execution-definite.html However, the US Chess Federation has made it ...


8

I take it you're referring to Beth Harmon, the protagonist of the series. There's no single chess master that resembles her, but various masters resemble her partially: In the fact that she's female: there's only been one woman who's reached the top in chess: Judit Polgar. Two other women, Hou Yifan and Vera Menchik, come close as well. In the fact that she'...


8

Depends- there's no real rule outside of "convention" and when a name's settled on by the community at large, it tends to stay that way (as openings in general). Often, it'll be named after a person who played it a lot, developed the theory, a country related to it by the nationality of one or more people that played/developed it (or otherwise ...


8

The New York 1924 tournament was effectively the Candidates Tournament, Alekhine came third, that put him at the top of the list of challengers. But before he could challenge Capablanca, he needed to raise $10,000 as per Capablanca's London Rules. That took some time. Once he had raised the amount, he then issued Capablanca a formal challenge, which was ...


8

I think the idea was that Beth felt uncomfortable because for the first time she was no longer the young prodigy. Here was someone else younger than her competing at the same level. How would she respond? This scene was, I understand, to some extent improvised. It seemed to show also Girev’s relative mental balance compared to Beth, at that point in her ...


8

This is actually a very interesting question! Actually, there were not many 1700 rated players 50 years ago because most ratings started above 2000. With the evolution of computers, it is very plausible that a 1700 player now is much stronger than 50 years ago. Nowadays, openings are spoon-fed and many references are available whereas those days every day ...


8

Some quick Googling suggests that the rules (or at least some sets of rules) do allow you to refuse a resignation from your opponent This does not reflect the FIDE Laws of Chess. According to Article 5.1.2: 5.1.2 The game is won by the player whose opponent declares he resigns. This immediately ends the game. This means that no player, GM or otherwise, is ...


7

As the other answers indicate, gambits - and openings in general - can receive their names from different factors. A few examples: The King's Gambit gets its name from opening with the king's pawn and gambiting the immediately adjacent flank pawn. The Queen's Gambit is similarly named, except the gambit is on the queen's side of the board. Although the ...


7

Following an adjournment, Beth Harmon is not spending any time at all at the table, whenever she made her move, she would wander around the hotel, looking at the game from far away. She would also sit on the side, fixing Georgi and even tapping her feet. I'm an arbiter, and I probably would... Do nothing about her running around. It is allowed if it's the ...


6

In her TED talk Giving checkmate is always fun, Judit Polgar says (t=0:59): My mother taught me the first moves when I was about five years old...


6

The character 砲 (pào) gives a significant clue: compared to 炮, which is homophonous, the radicals of these characters are different. 砲 uses the 石 radical, which means stone, and 炮 uses the 火 radical, which means fire. Although cannons were not yet invented until, as you say, the 12th century, trebuchets -- weapons of super long range that used stone -- ...


6

That sentence is taken out of context. I copy here the text of the full paragraph, which answers your question: If the game is not to be played rigorously, according to the rules above mentioned, then moderate your desire of victory over your adversary, and be pleased with one over yourself. Snatch not eagerly at every advantage offered by his unskilfulness ...


6

From a report by Harry Golombek on the seventh game of the Botvinnik v Smyslov world championship match in Moscow on 30 March 1954: Television made its first appearance in the history of world chess championship matches during the course of this game, which was televised from 8 till 8.30 p.m. Source: BCM, May 1954, page 141. The 24-game match had 14 ...


6

I googled a bit: By definition, ELO>100 Well, not really. 100 is the absolute floor for USCF ratings. If your performance would ordinarily set your rating below that, it is simply set to 100. For FIDE ratings, 1000 is listed as the minimum - if you go below that, you get de-listed entirely and have to earn a new rating. There's nothing in the definition ...


6

One cannot do better than simply refer you to the work of chess historian Bill Wall on this subject: https://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/articles/hgwells.htm Wells did not hate chess. He revered it for its power to absorb people, even the most intelligent of people, and captivate them for a lifetime. He followed the games of the top players with avid interest ...


5

Olimpiu G. Urcan has posted several twits about references of historical games and positions that appear in "The Queen's gambit": https://twitter.com/olimpiuurcan For example: https://twitter.com/olimpiuurcan/status/1321098273717825536 Connoisseurs will quickly recognize a small tribute to Bobby Fischer in this very brief #TheQueensGambit scene: ...


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