19

9.dxc5? is a horrible positional blunder. The Grunfeld for black allows white a big center, and his idea is to chip away at it, or force it to advance, and then chip away at it. That center controls a lot of nice squares, and is very desirable. 9.dxc5? by white voluntarily does what black is trying to achieve in a very bad way, and worse, it turns the Bg7 ...


10

In Volume 1 of his high-quality series on the Grünfeld for black, GM Avrukh recommends 3....b5!?, "playing in the spirit of the Benko Gambit". On page 6 of the PDF excerpt, you can find his analysis. However, this may not be to everyone's taste. Instead, he also gives the line 3....c6 4.Nc3 cxd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 Bg7 etc... "with equal chances". To me, this ...


8

it's actually impossible to keep the material advantage since after 9.dxc5 black has the move 9...Qa5 which puts a second attacker to the c3 pawn and also prepares to recapture the c5 pawn. All that white would be doing is giving up the strong center which is a huge deal in this line of the Grunfeld. Black, on the other hand, would be left with a more active ...


8

[FEN ""] [Event "WCh 2014"] [Site "Sochi RUS"] [Date "2014.11.08"] [Round "1"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [Eventdate "2014.11.08"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 ...


6

Attacking/Defending the empty house This is going to be a long answer that will require several edits to complete, but I wanted there to be an answer started. Not moving a pawn in front of the king leads it to be vulnerable to back rank mates. Moving a pawn in front of the king (making luft) creates holes that can be exploited (particularly by knights). ...


5

There are many types of Sicilians so you should specify which one you intend to play, But generally a good book is: Starting out: The Sicilian by John Emms Although there are a whole multitude of excellent books written about specific Sicilians so if you could specify more than I could recommend some excellent books on those specific Sicilians. For ...


5

Very often Black will end up with a poor pawn structure in return for piece activity for example after the pawn moves d5 e6 dxe6 and fxe6 (not necessarily right after another). As for other concepts, you need to accept that you need to study a lot of concrete lines. White has many options against your defence of choice such as: The crazy sharp anti-...


4

The main idea behind the Grünfeld is that Black momentarily concedes the center to White, only to attack it later. For example, in the Exchange variation, White often gets a pawn center (c3, d4, e4) while Black will put it under pressure (especially aimed at the white d-pawn). Below is a diagram with a typical pawn structure for this variation, and some ...


4

Anyway you cannot prevent someone avoiding the Grunfeld by move order. For instance, 1.c4, Nf6; 2. Nc3, g6; 3.e4, and it's done with the Grunfeld. The trick is it is better to play Grunfeld and KID (Bologan's KID book has a chapter devoted to this, i think) complementarily, even against the fianchetto variation. Quality chess books by Avrukh on the grunfeld ...


4

Bg5 on move 4 is a strategic move, prioritising a minority attack in some lines. The line 6.cxd5 with this plan is covered in Richard Palliser's Play 1.d4! Also 6.Bf4 is possible, see the game below played between Shogi legend Yoshiharu Habu and super GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (Annotations by Maxime Vachier-Lagrave). [StartPly "7"] [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 ...


4

Maybe 4.e3 is an interesting idea against the Grünfeld. Usually, black answers with 4....Bg7, but it should be noted that black can transpose to the Slav defence with 4....c6. After 4....Bg7, white has two interesting options: 5.Qb3 and 5.cxd5. 5.Qb3 is probably the most popular continuation, attacking the pawn on d5. If black plays 5....dxc4, then white ...


3

With 9. dxc5, you are giving up your central pawn duo, taking on doubled pawns, fracturing your queenside pawn structure, etc. Obviously this is not ideal, and you would only do this if you get some kind of material compensation. But you don't get any material compensation. After 9...Qa5, you can't simultaneously defend the c3- and c5-pawns. You'd be stuck ...


3

You're missing the fact that every good opening leads to balanced positions when played perfectly. This is the case for the Grünfeld as well. But just because the position is balanced after optimal play in an opening doesn't mean that the opening is easy to play optimally. In the Grünfeld the positions tend to quickly become rather unbalanced and sharp (...


3

The problem with this line is that this is exactly what Black is hoping for. You give the center to "win a pawn", but Black has several compensation : first of all the black bishop on ...Bg7 is now very strong. Also with ...Qc7 follow by ...Rd8 black will win the d-file. If Black want then they can easily win back the pawn by the following plan : ...e5, ......


2

chesspublishing.com has seven well-annotated (by GMs Glenn Flear and Neil McDonald) games starting with 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.e3 Bg7 5.Nf3 O-O 6.b4, ranging from 1999 to 2009. They're not free, though. The games are: Rabrenovic - Atalik 1999 Aleksandrov - Oral 2000 Bruzon Batista - Sutovsky 2004 Suvrajit - Harika 2004 Georgiev - Holzke 2007 Akobian - ...


2

Try this link. This will give you enough search words to find additional information about variations you might explore. Ultimately, you'll have to decide what's best for you. If there were a 'best' move, chances are 1... Nf6 would be a blunder.


2

Have you checked out Mikahil Marin's book on the Grunfeld: Grandmaster Repertoire 8: The Grunfeld Defence


2

Analyzing this position it seems like the N to the rim has potential issues getting back into the game. W will play b3 and both of the black N's on the Q side are very limited. After Ne7 the N gets back into the game via c8 and d6 playing an important role blockaiding the p at d5. That is the best I could find. Transposing to the same position did not ...


2

First, I think that a lot of it is simply to get away from the heavier theory of other lines. Stockfish does not think highly of this move, and it does not make sense that such a move would be best from a purely theoretical standpoint. From a practical standpoint, that is another ball of wax since some of the positions get very messy. After all, who does not ...


1

When you get more experience and appreciate positional play instead of just slash and burn tactics and material advantage then you would see that the move is terrible bad and has no advantages for white. When the dust settles black will have the initiative and material will be even and white has a weak isolated pawn.


1

This is D96/D97 classification - ECO D would be your best bet. It would be comprehensive in variations but in Chess Informant style. I would add this: Even though Eric Schiller is somewhat known for his error-prone books, this book is in it's second edition. I would venture to say that, as far as Schiller books go, it might not be all that bad. It really ...


1

There appears to be some additional options to White in the line without castling. I haven't checked a database but perhaps for example, 9...Na5 10.Qd3!? threatening Qb5+ and grabbing the knight on a5. So now if 10...0-0 Black has declared his king and White can consider 11.h4 going for attack.


1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BX9Ax29jZ1k is video 1 of 4 explaining this system. Mike Virgo has the links to the rest of the series. One of the comments is: "It is a good video, however, Roman makes one mistake. at 15:45, he forgot to place pawn on h3 back to h2." Many minor errors show in most chess videos, so ensure you understand the moves.


1

Of course it is absolutely playable -- Kasparov played it against Karpov! 2...h3 doesn't improve for White as the comments have noted. As for Nh4 -- you are misplacing the Knight, besides Be4, Black could even play Bd7-b5.


1

a) Is 2. Nh4 a threat? No, because black can play 2. .. Be4 which makes the knight on h4 look a bit silly. Note that 3. f3 does not work because of 3. ... Bxd5 and if 4. Qxd5 Rxe3 b) In the game Karpov-Kasparov, White played 2. 0-0 (after 1... Bf5) Nd7 3. h3 Nb6 4. g4 Bd7. Should Karpov have played 2. h3 instead? Probably it would lead to the same ...


1

I am a d4/c4 player and I do love "disappointing" my opponents who play grunfeld. I go for d4-e3 pawn structure and mess up the order of moves. This should theoretically be inferior to grabbing the centre but it just throws opponents off prep. Anyways, all I can advice you to do is to play the way I find the most annoying and it consists of throwing c5 in ...


1

According to http://chessok.com/?page_id=352 this has been played five times (by weaker players) and gives black a very slight advantage (-0.11) after 10…Qc7. So, depending on you level this is certainly playable. If you analyse it a bit you might even have practical chances to achieve an opening advantage. But probably black will just win back the pawn and ...


1

Sicilian is not in my repertory and I want to include it. I haven't read it yet, but after reading other books by GM De la Villa and some feedbacks I have read, I would recommend blindly "Dismantling the Sicilian: A Complete Modern Repertoire for White".


1

Winning with the Sicilian by Mark Taimanov.


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