44

A repetition giving the opponent the opportunity to claim a draw is a de facto draw offer but not a de jure draw offer. What does that mean? Well the "de facto" part means that in practice it has the same effect as a formal draw offer while the "de jure" part means that legally it is not a formal draw offer. Psychologically it makes a ...


22

I will try to answer this in a different manner, the way I understand this topic. Do we think on every signal, turn, fork when we drive? Do we think every time we eat food or walk on the street? The answer is yes, we do, but that thought process has moved to our reflexes to the extent that our brain does not let us know that it is doing a task (Thankfully!) ...


20

The short answer Yes, they do, although very few GMs do and by a margin of less than 10%. This does not seem to be due only to random factors (see long answer). An example is GM Joseph Gallagher. As you can see in his FIDE profile page, he has the following games record (as for 15 Dec. 2020): White +124 =118 -73, score = 58.1% Black +126 =124 -67, score = ...


19

In many top level tournaments you are not allowed to offer a draw before a certain number of moves are played (often 30 or 40). The purpose of such a rule is to prevent very quick draws. However, one of the ways to make a draw anyway is to simply repeat moves. Even if that rule is either not active or the move number has passed, it may still be encouraged to ...


17

Are there such examples of torturous winning, where a grandmaster resists his urge to resign and lets the opponent take all of his pieces before he gets checkmated? No, there aren't, for the simple reason that that sort of behaviour would require both players to behave in an extremely childish manner and childish behaviour (e.g. "hope chess") is ...


17

Are there asymmetric time controls where a GM can still beat Stockfish? Certainly, as long as you give Stockfish little enough time. I think the time you give to Stockfish is almost more important than the time that the GM gets. At 20ms I would favor the GM even at tournament time controls. A few years back I played a handicap game against Komodo where I ...


14

Not exactly a prize, but answers your question in spirit: Immortal Losing Game Wikipedia's summary of the game is: The Immortal Losing Game is a chess game between the Soviet grandmaster David Bronstein and the Polish International Master Bogdan Śliwa played in 1957 in Gotha. The name is an allusion to the more famous Immortal Game between Adolf Anderssen ...


13

Here's a comment by GM Kaufman, developer of Komodo (emphasis mine). Q: Author Cyrus Lakdawala suggested I ask: In what respect are the program's move choices human? A: All the features of the engines' evaluation function have been based on how some human (in the case of Komodo, me) thinks they should be defined. The weights were originally my subjective ...


13

White scores about 54%, which is quite different from White winning 54% of all game, more so considering how draws occur more often between stronger players. None of the top players score better as Black, and I doubt there are grandmasters who do. If that were the case, it'd definitely be due to a small sample. I used to have a better score as Black back ...


13

Grandmasters are financially incentivized to play in GM-norm invitational tournaments. The incentive can take different forms depending on the organisers' choice. Most often, GM are invited (travel, hotel and meals paid, with no fee asked for playing) and they compete for the money prizes in the tournament (usually the top 3 out of 10 players get money ...


7

Often, Grandmasters need to reach the 40-move mark. This standard time controls gives them 30 extra minutes if this milestone is reached. Often times, they will play very similar moves just to get pushed past this time, and may end up drawing here as well In the endgame, grandmasters seldom offer draws. So may games end in draws, but they will always try to ...


6

Can anyone please help me to understand about what's going on? Yes, it is nice that we can look up our entries on the FIDE rating website but actually there is a business need for this information for arbiters and tournament organizers to avoid fines from FIDE. Whenever a FIDE rated tournament is rated by FIDE (standard time control only because rapid and ...


6

What I got so far: Misc: Robert Byrne (UNSURE): phd in philosophy unless you can be a 'professor' without a phd, eg in the colloquial sense where 'professor' means instructor/lecturer Hou Yifan (SRZLY?) (UNSURE): same with the Robert Byrne thing as to what 'professor' means (i mean come on phd, really? i don't think so) Anatoly Karpov (UNSURE): I'm trying ...


6

Tal vs Botvinnik 1960 is very good as Tal is quite verbose in commentary and what he was thinking about during the game. In addition to the benefits you mentioned, the annotations help you understand what strong players think about in different positions and how they approach the game. Particularly useful is the strong player's positional understanding and ...


6

Looks like its a stock image: the oldest source of the image I could find from 2008: http://www.grafamania.net/clipart/6201-digital-vision-dv297surreal-business.html


5

I think you will find plenty of examples of such games, in time-controlled games where it is in the interest of the losing player to keep playing for three reasons: To try and flag the winning player on time - winning. Time pressure could cause your opponent to blunder To try and salvage a draw through a stalemate. Eric Rosen who streams on youtube is one ...


5

I can also answer this from AlphaGo's perspective because we know fairly precisely how it works. We can then reason by analogy for the human perspective. From a bird's eye view AlphaGo has 2 components, a neural network that looks at a snapshot of the board, and a Monte Carlo search step that uses the neural network output to search faster. Both the neural ...


4

One more: Jonathan Mestel has a PhD in applied mathematics (full details in first paragraph of the article) and works as a university professor.


4

While various chess rating systems have been used since the 20th century, with the most impactful being the FIDE rating established in 1970, it seems to have no consequences for this question. This is because the list of "quickest to become GM" will indeed closely, if not entirely, coincide with the list of "youngest GMs". One reason is ...


4

0 days. There are 28 players who achieved the grandmaster title immediately: 1 Fischer, Robert James 2 Spassky, Boris V. 3 Korchnoi, Viktor 4 Larsen, Bent 5 Petrosian, Tigran 5= ...


4

GM Pepe Cuenca likes to act a little bit like a fool, but he has got a PhD in Physics. https://youtu.be/jfNR16G34l0


3

This isn't an answer to the exact question posed, but it may nonetheless help. Lajos Portisch learnt to play aged 12. Akiba Rubinstein learnt at 14 or 16. (Sources vary.) Harry Pillsbury learnt at 16.


3

Here are the results of queries on the latest (April 2021) FIDE rating list. Interesting to note that Iceland is actually only in 2nd. I guess in the map in the question Monaco is too small to see. The first big country (population > 1 million) is Armenia in 5th. Russia, the country with the most GMs - 240, is only in 31st place. No sign in this list of ...


3

While the existing answers are great, and relevant to especially OTB tournaments, it's worth noting in online matches there are often extremely short time controls with players moving (or even pre-moving) so quickly, it's only possible to obtain a draw by repetition. The act of offering a draw and waiting for the opponent to accept or decline would simply ...


3

Update: Ah, see the list of all grandmasters. This has a death date column. Click on sex to get all the F's together and then see they're alive. Wait wiki page for Zhansaya Abdumalik, the most recent female grandmaster and the most recent grandmaster, says (but it's unsourced) She is the first Kazkakhstani woman, and the 38th woman overall, to earn the GM ...


3

"Needs citation!" (xkcd) That Wiki entry should be either disputed or given a reliable source. I googled a bit: Chicago Tribune article Sounds like from an interview, but I'm still not 100% satisfied. Another link, the danger is everyone is copypasting from everyone else. E.g. here would be the place I expect that it would be mentioned, but it isn'...


3

After several searches I can only find one source in which Granda is quoted about Grau's books. It's this part: "Yo tenía muchas limitaciones técnicas, así que me ganó con bastante facilidad, pero fue muy generoso porque le dijo a mi padre ‘Che, al pibe le falta Grau’. Mi padre, que no tenía mucho conocimiento de ajedrez en ese entonces, preguntó qué ...


2

GM Ken Rogoff has a PhD in economics.


2

To answer this question you would first have to explain what you mean by "long". If you define "long" as over the number of games played, then the next question is "which games do you count?" It shouldn't be surprising that if a grandmaster plays in their local weekend circuit against much-weaker players, they are almost never ...


2

Probably not what you're looking for, but you might still be interested in this game. [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] [White "GM Andrew Tang"] [Black "Leela Chess Zero"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 Be7 6. e3 O-O 7. Bd3 c5 8. dxc5 Bxc5 9. Nge2 Be7 10. O-O Nc6 11. Rc1 h6 12. ...


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