53

Rashid Nezhmetdinov, aka “Super Nezh”, was clearly GM strength, having a plus score in the 20 games he played against World Champions, including a plus score against his friend, Tal. He was also a five-time Russian champion (this title predates the Soviet Union, and is not the same as champion of the Soviet Union). I was a Russian linguist in the Air Force ...


40

Herbert Simon touched on this question. He received the Turing Award in 1975 and the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1978. His primary research interest was decision-making and is best known for the theories of "bounded rationality" and "satisficing". Satisficing is a decision-making strategy or cognitive heuristic that entails searching through the available ...


36

When a GM, or even lesser strong players reach a position that is totally unfamiliar, they have to break it down into components. They evaluate the following for BOTH sides. In general, a lot of this is done subconsciously by strong players. Material, and what pieces are better. Sometimes a well-placed knight can be better than a rook, for example. Can any ...


34

Where am I wrong? None of "the world's best intellectuals" spend much time playing chess. The only strong (GM strength) chess player who qualifies as an intellectual is Dr John Nunn GM who graduated with a first in mathematics from Oxford University at the age of 18. Why do people even play chess? The best answer to this was given by Siegbert Tarrasch ...


32

Enjoying chess and getting better at it can be viewed as an instrumental good, as well as possibly an intrinsic good. As an instrumental good, chess can help us be better in other areas of life. For example, playing consistently might help sharpen certain areas of your mind. Coming up with plans could help one make plans in real life as well. Knowing when ...


29

Let's take a conversation. The number of sentences that could be said are infinite. The number of grammatically correct is still infinte, as is the number of logically/conversationally correct would be. The humans pare down what they say in any situation by intuition/experience. As chess players study what should be played, their task is much easier than ...


25

Humans try to understand a game like this, to formulate rules, try to recognize patterns of what worked in one position and apply them in positions they consider similar. And it turns out that that is possible, otherwise there wouldn't be humans of different playing strengths, everybody would just be guessing. Then we used that knowledge to create engines ...


24

Probably more often than people realize. There have been several notable instances where GMs (even world champions) have missed simple mates in one. From my own experience, when I analyze my games the engine frequently will point out some ridiculous 25 move forced mate. In a game, I'm not going to take the time to calculate something like that out if I have ...


22

I agree with you, more than your coach. Just analyzing a GM game, even with a computer, is not helpful just by itself if you have no idea what is going on. For example, just earlier today, I answered a question here, where the person gave a computer line that made no sense as far as the plans for the position were concerned, so the computer was really no ...


21

It really depends on what you mean by "lengthen". I am not a GM, but as an "ordinary" Master, I have played 1700s before, who were lost by move 10, but the game still took 50 moves to finish. If you are trying to stay equal longer, that is a harder question to address. If you are just taking about purely lengthening the game, then you are looking to trade ...


18

It really depends on what counts as a missed checkmate. In Blitz we occasionally see a missed mate in 1. In slower games, mates in a few moves are rarelly missed. But the problem is that sometimes long mate sequences will be "intentionally missed", as the player will go for a solid advatange that guarantees victory rather than calculate a 15-move ...


17

You are wrong because you want to enslave the world's best intellectuals to dedicate their time and effort to tasks that you deem important rather than on what they find enjoyable and fulfilling.


15

In order to qualify for the title of Grandmaster, a player must achieve three Grandmaster norms. That is not accurate. The regulations for the award of FIDE titles are given here. There are two ways to become a grandmaster. Achieving norms and reaching a certain rating is one way but there are also Direct Titles. The FIDE handbook defines these like this:...


14

Vast intellectual talent does not automatically confer a loving desire to make society better. You fail to take into consideration the great number of humans who are superintelligent, overeducated, and energetic -- and who totally despise their fellow man. They are naturally given to long periods of brooding inner fury followed by bursts of precipitate ...


14

Are there such examples of torturous winning, where a grandmaster resists his urge to resign and lets the opponent take all of his pieces before he gets checkmated? No, there aren't, for the simple reason that that sort of behaviour would require both players to behave in an extremely childish manner and childish behaviour (e.g. "hope chess") is ...


13

Your question is quite interesting. If you are new to blindfold, I think this thread will help you: Can playing blindfold chess be learned or is it a natural skill? Now, back to your query. I have discussed this topic with a GM, who is one year senior at my college. According to him, playing blindfold is "NOT impossible", but it's fairly difficult. ...


11

If you want to last as long as possible against a much stronger player, whether GM or not, then you have to do the same kind of things a GM would do playing against another GM, with one minor amendment. First, a GM would prepare for his opponent. You should do the same. Go to chess-db.com (or your favourite chess database) and download a pgn file of all ...


10

So forget about Stockfish, forget about Kasparov, forget about GMs. You are 1850. You understand something about the game. Not everything will be correct, some of it will be. Start analyzing. It can be your own games, it can be any old game, it can be a random diagram you saw in the newspaper. Set up the position, and try to figure out what is going on. ...


10

The new, munged* FIDE rating website still has the old "Advanced Search" option, but the page doesn't have its own URL. There you can search for GMs from all countries sorted by rating ascending and then you get that the Russian GM, Vasily B Malinin, born in 1956 is the lowest rated GM with a standard rating of 2100. Looking at his individual ...


9

Why do people even play chess? Beyond fun and happiness, it could be that playing chess may help to sharpen focus, develop pattern recognition and memory, improve analytical abilities, enhance cognitive strength and develop other important skills that may help to "work on the betterment of society". working on the betterment of society It is very ...


9

What are the criteria that differentiate a chess grandmaster from a chess international master? The current FIDE rules regarding the awarding of international titles are described in FIDE Title Regulations effective from 1 July 2017. Basically there are two ways to achieve a title - via norms or directly via achieving a given result in a world or ...


8

Expanding on the great comments of @David and @Timothy Chow, GM Nikolai Krogius talks about the role of the residual image in his book Psychology in Chess. This is an image that stays and blurs the calculations. The residual image is the transfer of judgment from a past position to a new situation. The past then acts on the present. To combat this ...


7

Anything is possible. The real question is how likely are you and most people to do it that way. And it depends on what you call 'theory'. I read NO theory. But I read a lot of practical books on openings, tactics, end games, pawn structure, positional play, yada yada. They claim that an AI program learned to play Go by playing itself. I do not know ...


7

As of 2020 I believe by far the most popular sites to play online chess are lichess, chess.com and chess24. I am not aware of any publicly available statistics on the metrics you suggest. From what I see many of the top players are active on several sites. The commercial websites chess24 and chess.com are likely paying some of the titled players giving ...


7

I agree with the answers above, however, there are actually some cases where GMs missed mate-in-ones in classical chess while not in time trouble. If memory servers right, I have read about that a few years back on chess.com's news page, but I cannot find the article right now. The main reason is the following: Player A only needs a draw (to outright win the ...


6

Depends a lot from player to player and also position to position I think. The fundamental is that their intuition (built up from studying and playing and solving a lot) will suggest a few moves (or occasionally only one) and they will calculate those moves (candidate moves) and pick whichever they think is best based on calculation and evaluation. They ...


6

Interesting Chess Given a board configuration, many expert chess players are able to reproduce the moves which produce that configuration. However, of the 10^40+ board positions, grandmasters would be hard-pressed to reproduce the vast majority of board states. Why is that? Well, that's because most of them involve obviously bad moves, like developing ...


6

This is a philosophical question, not just a question about chess per se. There are in fact two questions here: Why do some people choose to devote their lives to chess, and What is the benefit (if any) of these people to society. Let's take them one at a time. Why do some people choose to devote so much energy to chess? The simplest answer is, because ...


6

This depends entirely your horizon for what you consider a missed mate. Is there any upper bounds on the number of moves required? Would you consider a "mate in 53" to be a missed mate, even if no one, human or computer, had the computational power to actually find such a mate (but maybe in 100 years a computer could show a forced mating sequence ...


6

If the aim is to award the title only to world class players, I can think of some much easier system to select them, e.g. you must have been rated in the top 100 of the world at one point. This would tie the title to a single, easily-understood number. I notice some of the lower titles already use this criterion (e.g. Candidate Master) The comparison with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible