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A repetition giving the opponent the opportunity to claim a draw is a de facto draw offer but not a de jure draw offer. What does that mean? Well the "de facto" part means that in practice it has the same effect as a formal draw offer while the "de jure" part means that legally it is not a formal draw offer. Psychologically it makes a ...


19

In many top level tournaments you are not allowed to offer a draw before a certain number of moves are played (often 30 or 40). The purpose of such a rule is to prevent very quick draws. However, one of the ways to make a draw anyway is to simply repeat moves. Even if that rule is either not active or the move number has passed, it may still be encouraged to ...


6

Often, Grandmasters need to reach the 40-move mark. This standard time controls gives them 30 extra minutes if this milestone is reached. Often times, they will play very similar moves just to get pushed past this time, and may end up drawing here as well In the endgame, grandmasters seldom offer draws. So may games end in draws, but they will always try to ...


3

Here are the results of queries on the latest (April 2021) FIDE rating list. Interesting to note that Iceland is actually only in 2nd. I guess in the map in the question Monaco is too small to see. The first big country (population > 1 million) is Armenia in 5th. Russia, the country with the most GMs - 240, is only in 31st place. No sign in this list of ...


3

While the existing answers are great, and relevant to especially OTB tournaments, it's worth noting in online matches there are often extremely short time controls with players moving (or even pre-moving) so quickly, it's only possible to obtain a draw by repetition. The act of offering a draw and waiting for the opponent to accept or decline would simply ...


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