Hot answers tagged

16

There are two levels at which this can be answered, I suppose: what were the personal motivations for offering/agreeing a draw, and what were the objective features of the position that grounded the decision? I think you're asking mostly after the second, but I've read many comments lately voicing frustration with agreed draws in this match, so I hope you ...


11

Kasparov's reason for that statement may be no deeper than this: The current rating list does give a concrete, factual basis for his assessment, though it is certainly something with which others might disagree. Current world #2 Levon Aronian, for one, made a point of contradicting Kasparov: "I don’t think [what Kasparov said] is true. The player that ...


10

Well, just when I was writing the question up, I finally found the answer -- no -- so I am answering my own question. Way down at the bottom of this web page, it gives the Yiddish name for the bishop (once transcribed from the Hebrew alphabet) as "der Loyfer," which is like the German name "der Läufer." So, assuming this is a reliable source (and it's ...


9

There's a great analysis of the game here: 2012 FIDE World Chess Championship: Anand vs. Gelfand - Game 1. According to the video, it is easy for white to get one of his rooks behind that pawn especially when both players are left with 1 rook, 1 bishop each.


7

Kasparov has been known to make controversial statements. He's just not politically correct. But it is the fact that the match winner will not be considered world strongest chess player by most. According to May 2012 FIDE Elo list Anand was no.4 and Gelfand no.20. The part about it being first time in long period of time is questionable, recent FIDE world ...


4

One winning line involves an exchange of queens and bringing the king to e5. [FEN "8/5p1k/1P4p1/2P4p/7P/5Q2/5PP1/4qbK1 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qxf7+ Kh8 2. Qf6+ Kh7 3. Qf4 Bb5+ (3... Bc4+ 4. Kh2 Bd5 5. c6 Bxc6 6. Qc7+ Kh6 7. Qxc6 Qxf2 8. Qc1+ Kh7 9. Qc7+ Kh6 10. Qd8 Qf4+ 11. Kg1 Qc1+ 12. Kf2 Qf4+ 13. Ke2 Qe4+ 14. Kd1 Qb1+ 15. Kd2 Qb2+ 16. Kd3 Qb3+ 17. Ke4 ...


3

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1666558 the shortest game is World Championship history. It's not so much the material difference, after Bd3 Qxb1+ two Rooks is not enough for the Queen and the Bishop, but the weakness around the Black King will cause Gelfand to lose anyway. After h6 and Ne4, d6 will fall and mate is always possible on g7. A ...


3

Both players played a solid game and were unable to gain an advantage. Trying to force an advantage where there is none to be found is asking for a loss at that level of play.


2

Why? Probably because of subjective pressure of the first game of World Championship match. From what I recall when watching this game - the commentators were also surprised that Gelfand offered/agreed to a draw. His advantage was also not only in the passed pawn (which could e either a strength or a weakness) but also in having two bishops.


1

Here's my take (FWIW): Black's remaining queenside pieces are undeveloped, He's lost control of the dark squares, He can't conquer either White's back or 2nd rank, His queen is trapped, He's about to get a spike pawn shoved down his throat at h6, All of this has happened in 17 moves, meaning Anand must have foreseen this variation in his home preparation,...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible