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9

Well, it is funny that 4.Nc3 is then the most popular move, with 4.d4 a distant second. In practice though, 4.d4 scores a very high 73.3% for white, compared to only a typical 56.7% for 4.Nc3. In addition, Stockfish much prefers 4.d4, and it is not even close (-.54 to +.92). I will take that big center, and get my pawn back with an open f-file any day. The ...


8

While it's a gambit by Black, what about Tal's gambit? Black is scoring 55% in 228 grandmaster and elite correspondence games after 1 e4 c5; 2 f4 d5; 3 exd5 Nf6. I'd call Black doing better than 50% in that many top games an advantage. (And 55% is better than Black's score in any of the main non-gambit responses to 2 f4.)


8

The Evans Gambit is probably one of the most sound. It's still occasionally played at GM level and most of the critical lines are rarely if ever tested. The Vienna Gambit and Blackmar–Diemer are probably playable. The Scotch gambit is playable although I wouldn't be surprised if there isn't a forced draw. With black the Benko is probably sound and the ...


7

About the second line, 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d6: This line is known as the King's Gambit, Fischer defense. One thing it isn't is "ignoring your gambit" - Black is stopping you from playing Ne5 after the well-known Black maneuver ...g5-g4 in the King's gambit main lines. The most common line now is 4. d4, when 4...g5 5. h4 g4 forces White to play 6. Ng1 (...


6

It is safe to say that it is nothing more than a joke. First, as a reasonably strong player, I cannot see any redeeming reason to play that...no tricks, no nothing. Second, in Mega 2020, there are only three games out of more than 8 million total, which I will give below; and looking at them, it is clear that black did not take any of them seriously. Maybe ...


6

As a person who has experience in the Bird's and Dutch openings, I would say that both of them are somewhat bad responses to the Birds or Dutch. In the From's, generally white has the edge but its not as if black doesn't have counterplay. In the Lisitsin, usually something like 1Nf3 f5 2e4 fxe4 3Ng5 Nc6 4d3 e3 is something close to equal. There is a version ...


5

Two sound gambits for Black: The Marshall Attack in the Spanish: [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4 14. g3 Qh3 This is the main line. Be aware that you need to know lots of theory to play this opening, as most lines are analysed ...


5

Games 61/62 of the 17th TCEC season featured such a gambit: [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c5 3. d5 Qb6 4. Nc3 White gambits the b2-pawn. After 4...Qxb2 5. Bd2, Stockfish evaluated the position as +0.61 for White. In the reverse game, Leela gave White a +0.49 advantage after the same moves.


5

Sense of Humor There are several real but somewhat silly openings that gets its name. Sodium Attack (1. Na3), Ammonia opening (1, Nh3), Meadow Hay Gambit (1. a4 e5 2. Ra3 Bxa3), Picklepuss Defence (1. e4 h5 2. d4 Nf6). No one will actually play these in tournaments or something, they serves no useful purpose (except maybe training), but they're funny. ...


5

I think that a lot of the answers to your various questions about "why this or that" come down to the fact that it is just very unexplored theory, and the black players are just using their best judgment, probably mostly on-the-fly since Rg1 is so rare. I have just 18 games in my database after 9...Bxe4, and 7 of those games were played by white players ...


5

It comes down to flexibility. In most cases, Nb4 will end up in the same position, as you said, but Bb4 give you at least two more common alternatives, and a couple less common ones. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Nb4 5. c3 Nc6 (5...Na6?) 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 Compare this with this line where black can play Ba5, Be7, Bc5, and even Bd6 have ...


3

Normally you sacrifice material for the initiative or a positional compensation, but this opening clearly has nothing in it and all you are doing by bringing the queen out early is allowing white to gain a tempo on it. I would say it's like a Scandinavian a pawn down and the Scandinavian by itself is quite bad.


3

In my database it actually appears in 131 games, or roughly 1.5%. The move also isn't objectively bad. But it's unpopular partly because it unnecessarily limits Black's options. After 4...Nxb4 5.c3, Black is practically forced to play 5...Nc6, which transposes to 4...Bxb4 5.c3 Bc5 (as you mentioned). Meanwhile, after 4...Bxb4 5.c3, Black has many options (5....


3

The Luccini Gambit sacs a rook. [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. d3 f5 5. Ng5 f4 6. Nf7 Qh4 The Nakhmanson gambit sacs some pawns and a bishop [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nf3 Nc6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. Nc3 dxc3 7. Bxf7+ Kxf7 8. Qd5+


3

The Stafford is getting popular because of the Youtube videos I guess. I saw it earlier today and just played 5.Be2 to take it out of book and won easily. It's a trappy opening and you're going to have to accept the fact that not every white move gives you a mate in 2. The best move is probably Bf5. The downside to Qe2 is that 1) white hinders his own ...


3

Rats. I thought I had a 5. Qe2 somewhere... Crap, that colllection of Stafford games was on the stolen laptop. ...Bf5 was a suggestion earlier, right? Then if d3 kicks you back to c5, and d4 hits you again, you can drop back to e6 without blocking the bishop, or go in for ...Ne4 f3 Qh4+ Qf2 (what a mess) .


2

You can try for Zukertort Trap in the Lisitsin Gambit line. After 1. Nf3 f5 2. e4 the trap-line is Ng5 then if the opponent sticks with his pawn on f5, and pushes d5, then, simply play d3, followed by exd3 and then play Bxd3, and notice that the king has serious weakness on one of its diagonals. Now, if opponent replies with Nf6, then the best option is Nxh7....


2

It's possible to keep the pawn but at the expense of seriously weakening the queenside and fall behind in development. Keeping the pawn is certainly playable but you will need to know how not to be busted in the centre. Keeping or giving the pawn, both possible in Catalan. Whether you like it or not depend on your personal preference.


2

Chessplayers need to think of the opening more in terms of plans than in moves. Whether either the From or Lisitsin is good or bad, and any benefit from White's additional move in Lisitsin isn't as important as familiarity with this pattern: rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 [Result ""] 1. g4 e5 2. f3 Qh4# Oh, everyone ...


2

Naman Kumar asks "Now what am I supposed to do?" if the gambit pawn is declined. Naman, you play the King's Gambit for sharp, tactical games (although I think it was David Bronstein who played it as a positional opening?) so by declining the gambit you already have a small concession by Black. Your play should be to rapidly develop and castle: so ...


2

I just want to save 2 gambits from being classified as "bad", the fried liver and the king's. 3 cooks fried an GM with the fried liver, the fried liver is +1.67, and the king's gambit's only "refutation" is the keene's defense, weakening the kingside (1.e4 e5 2.f4 Qh4+). You could say the froms is good, but in fact, if white plays ...


2

Sometimes there's some practical value in taking a line others feel is unplayable and making it somewhat playable. At best, you should be aiming for a line that gives the opponent lots of chances to go wrong but allows you drawing chances if the opponent plays perfectly. I could give ideas but your opponent could be reading this too. It's best to come up ...


2

A variation of the Caro Kann, Advance: Tal Variation called Caveman Variation is a "gambit" where White can gambit mere pawns, or whole pieces, but probably will mate. If Black should go for the rook, the imbalance most often is 2 rooks + 2 pawns for the queen in a structure that favors the queen. [FEN ""] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. ...


2

the fried liver is one of the 2 only real gambit stockfish likes, or the queens gambit. it appears that the benko gambit is one gambit that have big pressure against whites Q side


2

The line given by Allure is the standard refutation of the Danish however the line given by Hamish might be even better. That line was played by Capablanca and I don't realistically see white having any winning chances.


1

After 4...Nxb4 5.Nxe5 looks like a very strong reply, gaining the important e5 Pawn almost for free and posing an immediate threat to f7.


1

A qualified yes. I played in Philadelphia in the mid 50s and ran into a weird opening that is probably sound if not the best and had trouble with it. Turns out it was very popular in the Philly area but unheard of , back then, anywhere else. Now it is in opening books and even has a name.


1

I used to play this a lot as black and the line that worried me most was 1. e4 e5 2. f4 d5 3. exd5 e4 4. d3 Nf6 5. dxe4 Nxe4. White is completely fine here and if black presses too hard it can become a wildly tactical position where black is just struggling to survive. If you're confident in your tactics, you should be okay but that depends a lot on your ...


1

Maybe black hopes the practical advantages give him a better chance. Or maybe black just likes the position. I, myself, would much rather be down a pawn and dictating the position than up a pawn and defending.


1

The Damiano Defense, also known as the five pawns gambit, is practically refuted. You can find the details on the Wikipedia page. The key line is: e4 e5 2. Nf3 f6? 3. Nxe5! fxe5? 4. Qh5+ Ke7 5. Qxe5+ Kf7 6. Bc4+ d5 7. Bxd5+ Kg6 8. h4 h5 9. Bxb7 After which Black cannot stop Bxa8 with a decisive material advantage for White.


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