10

There's a 12-page chapter on this position in Cristoph Wisneski's "Play 1...Nc6!: A complete chess opening repertoire for Black." In that book it's reached via 1.e4 Nc6, 2.d4 d5, 3.Nc3 e6. More generally you're probably more likely to see this discussed in books on the Nimzowitsch defense (with d5, not e5) rather than French defense books.


9

In the French Defense, the modest pawn advance in e6 simply plans to challenge the e4-pawn by d5, without having to recapture with the Queen after a possible capture in d5. The idea is thus similar to the Caro-Kann. The differences are that the Caro-Kann takes away the best square for the b8-Knight, while the French blocks the natural diagonal for developing ...


8

I apologize for posting a comment as an answer, but this is the only way for me to include diagrams, which I find helpful. You have entered Advanced French defense by transposition. After 1.e4 d5 2. e5 e6 3.d4 we get the following position: [StartFlipped "0"] [fen "rnbqkbnr/ppp2ppp/4p3/3pP3/3P4/8/PPP2PPP/RNBQKBNR b KQkq - 0 3"] The usual way of reaching ...


7

There's also a chapter on it in "Dangerous Weapons: French" by John Watson from Everyman (2007)


6

Three most common replies to the French are 3.Nc3, 3.Nd2 and 3.e5, in your question you are ruling out 3.Nc3 and 3.e5, so 3.Nd2, the Tarrasch, seems like a natural suggestion, and it is less sharp than Winawer and if closing of the center happens it is on better terms for white than in Advance variation, so it might be worth a look. But if you want to avoid ...


6

Since the question is posed very generally, I'll only give a rough overview of some of the more typical ideas behind the Winawer for black. I'll mostly focus on positions after 4.e5 as that is the key line allowing white to fight for an advantage out of the opening. It must be noted that the ideas tend to vary somewhat greatly depending on which specific ...


5

No source, and I understand you're not asking about this, but I'm writing this anyway because I suspect you'll be interested. I'm told at the highest level (correspondence chess), 1. e4 e6 is at best a draw for Black. In other words, if you play the French defense as Black, you are playing for a draw - actually even worse than that, since you'll be suffering ...


4

As explained in the fine answer by AlwaysLearningNewStuff, you have transposed into the Advanced French. Such transpositions are common in chess. That's why, if you are assigning an opening to a game you would normally go backwards and base it on the last known theoretical position in that game. Concerning the moves of that game. 2. e5 is objectively not ...


3

The fact is that you will need to pick a good book, which is difficult since there are a million books out there on the French. When starting out with a new opening, picking a book that is heavy on theory is not so important as is a book that presents ideas well. For this purpose, I suggest the book "Mastering the French" by GM Neil McDonald. I also ...


2

Your best bet is to play the Exchange Variation with 3. ed. [fen ""] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 Yes, white's advantage after this is very small but you will get a more open game which is probably not what your opponent was hoping for. It has a bit of a dull, boring reputation because one line is symmetrical but there is lots of scope for both ...


2

I was not sure that I could answer this question because there are so many non-standard types of positions in the Winawer, and it covers entire books. I am primarily going to discuss the famous main line, and what its basic ideas are for both sides. The main line is where white plays an early Qg4, and attacks the black kingside. The main ideas for both ...


2

The pawn isn't considered a piece in chess, so it doesn't break the rule of moving the same piece twice. Also, many books and engines have 2. ...d6 as a good reply. However 2. ...c5 is the best move.


1

Sadler QGD book is fantastic - I know some pretty strong players who don't even play QGD as black (or 1.d4!) who read that book just for the instructive value. Don't use the lines themselves (very old book) as a repertoire if you are >2200 FIDE (lichess I don't know how to translate but it is probably lower than FIDE) but QGD is more about understanding - ...


1

I am 2300 USCF and I recommend Boris Avrukh's books. His main focus has been the Catalan for some years now but the QGD is well covered.


1

People (like myself) who occasionally play 1.Nc3 regard this as a main line and are not unhappy to see it. The book by Keilhack mentioned by @mleonard is excellent (as a general chess book) and points out all the transpositional possibilities that White might try to confuse you with. As a counter to some of the remarks made above, White does not always ...


1

It is immediately punishable with 2...d6. White doesn't have a good way to protect the e-pawn. f4 is going to get crushed by dxe5 followed by Qh4+ d4 is just bad. After 3...dxe6 4. dxe5, Qxd1 5. Kxd1 black is better Nf3 is probably best but after 3...dxe5 4. Nxe5, Bd6 white doesn't really have anything other than moving the knight back to f3 and now black ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible