37

While I'm not sure exactly how "fēənˈketō" would be pronounced (I'm not a native English speaker), that's more correct as to the pronunciation of the "ch" (following the Italian pronunciation). The pronunciation written in English would be something like fee-ahn-keh-toh, with the accent on the third syllable (keh). I just found this website in which there ...


29

According to Wikipedia: In chess, the fianchetto (/ˌfiænˈtʃɛtoʊ/; Italian: [fjaŋˈketto] "little flank") is a pattern of development ... Hence English speakers pronounce the "ch" as in "chess" and Italian speakers as in "kettle". Which suggests that there is no "true, and proper, pronunciation".


15

All the things you say are true! But fianchettoed bishops have some advantages as well. Here are a few: They control multiple central squares at once. A fianchettoed bishop attacks half of the center four squares (e.g., a bishop on g2 attacks e4 and d5). Bishops not on the long diagonals can't do this. They also can attack multiple squares around the ...


12

There are two reasons for doing this and immediately taking the fianchettoed bishop is not one of them: Provoke Black into playing BxB when you hope to follow up with Ng5, drive the f6 knight away and then mate on h7 Prevent black from playing h5 until you have been able to play h2-4-5 to pry open the black king's position. It can even be worth ...


10

There are a few benefits behind exchanging off the fianchettoed bishop. For this example, I'll assume the stage is Black's kingside after ...g6 and ...Bg7 are played. Weakening the surrounding squares. Without the fianchettoed bishop, the squares weakened by pushing the pawn (such as h6 and g7 when Black plays ...g6) are less protected. Making the enemy ...


9

In a lot of cases you just rely on your intuition. With enough experience you can tell whether a fianchetto makes sense in setups like the Sicilian. But here are some tips for when to do it: If the long diagonal is open, since the bishop will not be blocked along it. If your opponent doesn't have a bishop on the same colour as the soon to be fianchettoed ...


7

1) The diagonal it controls is often blocked by the knight in its natural square. It's not too bad, the knight is a dynamic piece and sooner or later it will be moved. 2) The diagonal it controls is often blocked by central pawns of the same team or of the opponents. Maybe the main strategy in the opening and middle game after fianchetto is try to ...


7

Many responses will be good against g3 - if you have problems against it - actually its indicator that you have problems with general chess principles, so just study chess, get some good book on middle-game strategy and don't think of g3 for now. g3 is very slow and has no real opening threat for black - it takes on middle-game understanding though.


6

[FEN ""] 1. d4 c5 2. d5 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 d6 5. e4 Nf6 6. Bf4 O-O 7. Qd2 Re8 8. Be2 e6 9. Nf3 exd5 10. exd5 a6 11. O-O Bg4 12. h3 Bxf3 13. Bxf3 Qc7 14. a4 Nbd7 15. Rfe1 Bf8 16. Ne4 Nxe4 17. Rxe4 Rxe4 18. Bxe4 Re8 19. Re1 Bg7 20. b3 Be5 21. Bxe5 Rxe5 22. Bf3 Qd8 23. Rxe5 Nxe5 24. Bd1 Qf6 25. f4 Nd7 26. Qe3 Kf8 27. Bg4 Nb6 28. a5 Na8 29. Bc8 Qa1+ 30. Kh2 ...


6

By far, the most aggressive and direct response to 1.g3 is prepare for king-side pawn storm with h7-h5-h4. That doesn't mean you play 1...h5! I'm afraid there're too many setups for ...h5. You have to see what White do. A possibility is: ...Bf5, ...Qd7, ...0-0-0, ...h5, ...h4, ...hxg3, ...Bh3 Sorry, there's no way to cover all the possibilities. The ...


6

Attacking/Defending the empty house This is going to be a long answer that will require several edits to complete, but I wanted there to be an answer started. Not moving a pawn in front of the king leads it to be vulnerable to back rank mates. Moving a pawn in front of the king (making luft) creates holes that can be exploited (particularly by knights). ...


5

The main reason why Black tends not to fianchetto in this position is because she has already played ...e6, which in conjunction with playing ...g6 to develop the bishop, unnecessarily weakens the dark squares on the black kingside without gaining anything; instead ...e6 has wasted a tempo that could otherwise be saved, and potentially hindered development ...


5

I have only ever played the Maroczy Bind against the sicilian and in the light of this limited knowledge all your propositions make some sense. 1./2. Be2 is where you normally place your bishop in the sicilian binds and it makes sense to refrain from e4 (at least for a time) if you fianchettoed the bishop. I have also read that after the fianchetto the ...


5

Optimal piece setup in openings are determined by pawn structures. If you compare the common pawn structures of the openings KID, Gruenfeld, Queen's Gambit, Queen's Indian with the Dutch you will notice a substantial difference: The existence of the black f5-pawn and white's pawn on e2 rather than e4. The black pawn structure of Stonewall Dutch is usualy c6-...


5

The g3 and Bg2 setup is strong defensively and strong offensively. White wants to play e4 to challenge the f5 pawn and Black's kingside white square complex. g3 and Bg2 is one of the best ways to support e4 with Nd2/c3 and Qc2 along with defending the king.


5

Fianchetto is commonly pronounced in English as /fiænˈtʃɛtoʊ/ (soft ch as in "cherry") but the original Italian word is pronounced /fjaŋˈketto/ (hard ch as in "chaos"). Note the word is cognate to English flank. It is common for terms borrowed from other languages to take on 'erroneous' pronunciations if the inherited orthography is ...


5

It seems to me that it's the best way to quickly develop the bishop and castle. The pawn on d6 prevents the bishop from developing immediately to (say) b4. Developing to g7 puts the bishop on a long diagonal, which is a great place for a bishop to be. Even if it doesn't make immediate threats, it will likely have a lot of mobility as soon as the knight moves,...


4

This is a typical Sicilian Dragon position. The fianchetto Bishop controls the long diagonal which helps protect the King, by protecting the h8 square and providing luft, and attacks the opposing King. The Bishop is able to control two center squares while one posted on c4 can only control one center square. The Knight does currently obstruct the Bishop, ...


4

Richard Reti's book 'Modern Ideas in Chess' can be read in full here. It is an amazing book! Disclaimer: I am among the authors of the site ;)


4

Play purposefully... What does it mean? From a high-level point of view, white is giving up control of the center by playing on the flank - the best way to counter that is for you to play in the center. Pawn advances in the center and piece activity will get you there. For example, if white castles king side and starts pushing h-pawn, that will make g3 pawn ...


4

A weakness is only a weakness if it can be tortured by the opponent. In example 1, White has already castled, so Re1-e4-h4, Q-d2-h6 seems to be the only way to bring on some scary firepower against the king. Also, the Pe7 still protects f6, so at least not a double weakness (Ph2-h4-h5-h6, Qf6 would be otherwise the standard plan). Still, the computer ...


3

Most of the reasons given by NoseKnowsAll are correct for this particular position. Put shortly, Black's bishop was a "worse bishop" and the remaining pieces leave White in a disadvantageous endgame. Please take into account that chess decisions cannot be taken based on a fixed set of rules that applies in all situations. If that were the case, we would be ...


3

First of all, to sit back and wait isn't a good strategy for black, as white has many useful moves to make: h3, Be3, Qc2, Rfe1, Rad1. If white can get these moves in with black doing nothing, white will be clearly better. So black has to look for counterplay. Most of black's options involve c6 to activate the queen on the d8-a5 diagonal. If you absolutely ...


3

When in Rome speak Roman. They may say fi an Ket oh in Italy, but the rest of the world says fi an CHet oh. Words change meanings and pronounciations over time and the majority usage eventually wins out. I always have heard fi an Chet oh and that is how I say it.


3

One additional point: While a fianchetto structure in front of your own king might seem quite massive at first glance, it's usually more vulnerable to a pawn storm. When your opponent's pawns reach h5 or f5 it is hard to avoid that lines are opened towards your king. That's why white is so often going for opposite side castling in the Dragon or the Pirc.


3

In the first position you mentioned, I'm guessing the reason why the engine recommends Bg7 is because Re8 weakens the f7 pawn, which could conceivably get loose later on. In the last position, before your last line I was going to say that I liked f6 there rather than Bf6. I'm not completely sure why, but I think the reason is that the bishop is awkward on f6....


2

I'd recommend against a Grunfeld white play reversed Catalan lines Against a KID either the Torre or... Or.. Play the French vs KIA lines as white!!! Pretty solid lines Stonewall against delayed c5! Sure! Chances are your playing a Sicilian fanatic who plays that set up against everything... And who at the very least is gonna hate you for A) playing an ...


2

4...g6 just gives you a bad version of a Grunfeld where Black has played the pointless weakening move ...e6, blocking in the light squared bishop. It doesn't fit with Black's strategy in the QGD, which is to hold onto d5 with ...e6, exchange pieces, and carefully neutralize white's opening advantage. The kingside fianchetto belongs to the alternate ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible