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0

this would be tough to win OTB with many ways to end up drawn a computer might do it but I doubt it would be quick and easy


1

I am unsure what version of Stockfish you were using so I ran analysis 12 times; 4 seperate engines for each version of Stockfish. Stockfish 10 vs ( Ethereal , Komodo, LC0 , Stockfish 12 ) Stockfish 11 vs ( Ethereal , Komodo, LC0 , Stockfish 12 ) Stockfish 12 vs ( Ethereal , Komodo, LC0 , Stockfish 12 ) Results were Stockfish (white) at the end of 20+ ...


4

This answer is intended to expand upon my comments, and give some concrete lines. Let's discuss the position as I (mistakenly) first thought it was presented: [fen "R7/6p1/P3p1k1/7p/8/6PP/r7/4K3 w - - 0 1"] This position is a draw, no matter who is to move. If White doesn't play a7, then Black's rook will have the option to pick off one of White's ...


1

1 - Play faster. 2 - Lose your knight and then the program will call it a draw. 3 - Move your king around for 50 moves and claim a draw; see answer 1. 4 - Play OTB instead of online. Find the Director and claim the draw for lack of material to mate.


9

You have three choices: Always play with an increment, then this won't arise because you can always move within the increment Try and fork your opponent's king and knight. Either he takes your knight or you take his knight next move - result = draw. Or the best and simplest with so much time left Just play very fast until you have made 50 moves without any ...


1

White must have two bishops of one colour and a bishop of the other to get checkmate. White can then attempt to pin Black's lone bishop, which is. easier as more pieces get on the board. Then, White can checkmate.


2

Just move your pawns and your kings up solidly, avoid giving counterplay. At some point you will get the opportunity to get a passed pawn, that you can then usually trade to get several pawns on a wing. Two short game examples played against stockfish with just king and pawns in initial position while removing black d pawn. First one is very simple without ...


0

The opening. It's common sense. Is it easier to manage something with 32 moving parts, or 5? Purdy said that it's relatively easy to play a fair opening (though impossible to play a perfect one), because one or two slips in the opening won't kill you, whereas one or two slips in the ending swing wins into draws, draws into losses. Chess players do better to ...


3

Thats an extremely opinionated question. Example, I study end games more and generally ignore openings. Middle games to me is largely tactics driven. I find studying end games easier than openings which seems purely rote in learning. I know folks who can recite openings , love studying them and think studying openings is easy. They are horrible with end ...


1

Queen endings are among the most difficult. We usually say "win by force" when there's a definite winning line. You're asking if White is certain to win, not at all certain. A human player would look first to winning the queenside pawn and then with an advantage on both wings, many chances to win. But while that pawn sits on a black square White ...


2

As ever, it depends. In general, given adequate king shelter, the rooks have good chances when there are targets to coordinate against.


5

A more practical form of your question relates to the Exchange Lopez and Tartakover Caro-Kann. Euwe did a complete analysis of how White wins the Exchange Lopez pawn ending if you set up the pawn structure with no pieces on the board: 4k3/1pp2ppp/p1p5/8/4P3/8/PPP2PPP/4K3 w - - 0 1 While the Tartakover Caro=Kann is the same thing on the other wing. In this ...


13

Generally speaking, it's a draw. Most pawnless endgames are drawn, unless one side has a material advantage of more than a minor piece. Either side can win if there are short-term tactics. To check the outcome of a position, you can use an online tablebase. In particular, it's nice to view the longest wins for either side, which are (according to this page) ...


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