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Although it might not be possible to realise chess in a database in this universe, the abstract structure of the game can be said to exist as a finite mathematical object. One can reason about it and conclude that it has a definite result, although we might not know what that is. And then if you view it as a matrix you can ask questions like what is the ...


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Strange as it may seem, you want to start a Kingside attack. This puts black in a quandary. He can stop the attack by exchanging pieces, but then he will be without counterplay in the ending. A lot of technique in a winning positions has to do with the "principle of two weaknesses". If you Google this phrase you will find a lot of very useful stuff. This is ...


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Starting out, it is worth mentioning that Stockfish 11 gives an eval of +3.02 at a depth of 32. I think that this is objectively a win, but in practice, for a human, it could present some practical problems, but they should be something that a strong player should be able to overcome without much difficulty. The obvious basic plan is to advance the pawns, ...


1

I know that this is three years late, but Stockfish with partial 7-piece tablebases immediately says 0.00. Now, at a depth of 71, it still says 0.00. I think it is, indeed, a draw. Of course, there is no harm in trying, and the plan in such endings is to try to walk the king toward your own pawn. Clearly, it should not work based on the computer assessment, ...


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A lot of endgame work is dry, and there is no getting around that. I learned endgames long before those books were available, and although it was a lot of work, I loved Ruben Fine's "Basic Chess Endings". In it, there would be a base example, but then often, many other similar examples. By going through it, I saw multiple examples that were similar, thus ...


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I disagree that it is a draw. In practice, it might not be a good practical decision to trade the rooks there if you are not sure it is a win, but it was almost certainly a win. Despite the opposite-colored bishops, you are up two pawns, but more importantly, and the reason it is still a win, is that the black pawn is on the h-file, and the unbalanced pawns ...


2

Is the position after 31. Re8+ a draw? Yes. With opposite coloured bishops you need to be able to generate two passed pawns and they must also be far enough apart. If they are too close then the opponent's bishop and king can cover both of them. This is why you need to know your endgames. Without this knowledge it is very easy to turn a winning position ...


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So just why is that f7-g6-h5 setup so important? Compare the two pawn structures below, one on the kingside where Black has achieved the f7-g6-h5 structure and one on the queenside where White has achieved an advanced equivalent pawn structure. [FEN "8/p4p2/Pp3Pp1/1Pp3Pp/2P4P/8/8/8 b - - 0 23"] Now imagine kings on the board and one minor piece, say a ...


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This is a very common rook endgame at higher levels, and it is considered very important to know how to defend it at the 2000-rating level and above, and maybe even a little lower. The answer as to why the f7-g6-h5 formation is so important is that it combines a relatively safe pawn structure for hiding the black king, and it makes it almost impossible with ...


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I did some further searching and found an article about an endgame tablebase that takes into account the 50-move rule that was created by Galen Huntington, which is an interesting concept. The article gives a position that is mate in 154 that accounts for the 50-move rule-a new length record! However, I am not taking into account the other positions that ...


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Imagine there'd be no other pawns on the board, except for the b2 pawn and the e5 pawn. Then ask yourself the question: is black's position won? If the answer is yes, there is no need for calculation, right? The answer is yes, because of an elementary (yet crucial) manoeuvre: keeping the black rook on the fourth rank, thereby cutting off the enemy king. ...


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In short, the plan you proposed is possible, but it is just too slow, even if black allows it, which is not mandatory. If black permits it, here is a simple win that, although I checked it with a computer, I could see it in my head fairly easily, which means those two could see it that much more easily. [FEN "8/8/1R4p1/4P1P1/2r2K1p/7P/1p6/2k5 w - - 0 1"] ...


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While it may appear that White can whisk around Black's rook and promote, there is a indeed problem that you have missed: Black can promote first! White's king is currently in check from Black's rook, so the monarch must be moved to either the f3 or e3, cutting the king off from half of the board. Since White lost a tempo moving their king, Black now ...


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