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24

If White can get the Black king to the first rank, then it will not be fast enough to catch the g-pawn from promoting. White starts by playing 1. Qg5, and after 1...Kh7 2. Qf6 Kg8 3. Qh6, the White queen can simply imitate the Black king's movements until she can start forcing the king down towards the first rank. [FEN "7k/8/8/8/6p1/4QpPb/5PpP/6K1 w - -...


12

I'm not sure about the fastest checkmate, but this should be the general procedure: Then Black After


4

I think the following will happen at chess.com: If KNN runs out of time, KR wins. If KR runs out of time, it is a draw. If chess.com abides by the FIDE Laws of Chess then this is false. If the side with K+R runs out of time then they lose. K+R vs K+N will also lose. This is the relevant article: 6.9 Except where one of Articles 5.1.1, 5.1.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.2, ...


10

So white obviously has to start with Then, So [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h3 {Queen is on black, so the pawn goes to white! Now we keep it that way} Qa2 3. h4 Qa1 4. h5 Qa2 5. h6 Qa1 6. h7 Qa2 7. h8=N Qa1 8. Ng6 Qa2 9. Ne5 Qa1 10. Nd7 Qa2 11. Nxc5 Qa1 12. Na4 Qa2 13. Nb6 Qa1 14. Nxc4 Qa2 15. Na5 Qa1 ...


14

First, Then Meanwhile [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h4 Qa2 3. h5 Qa1 4. h6 Qa2 5. h7 Qa1 6. h8=N Qa2 7. Ng6 Qa1 8. Ne5 Qa2 9. Nxc4 Qa1 10. Na5 c4 11. Nxc4 Qa2 12. Na5 Qa1 13. Nxb3# However, So let's try [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h3 Qa2 3. h4 Qa1 4. ...


26

OK The check must come from the knight (D'uh!) The black king must be on c5 for the mate The white king must be used to cover any empty squares to the right of the black king - thus the white king must move, thus there must be at least one non-checking move On a non-checking move Black can try to release the prison by Ra4 The only way white can cover this ...


68

It's checkmate in 20 moves. White's queens circle around the board giving checks, and Black interposes horizontally/vertically moving pieces. Black only has one choice because the other piece is pinned from the previous check. That goes well, until the pawn needs to move sideways: [FEN "3Q4/7Q/3rp3/2rkr3/2rrr3/7K/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qb7+ Rc6 2. Qa5+...


1

Ng5 looks simple and should be game over. Then Nxf7 (sac) or Nxe6. If e5, Nxf7 Kxf7 Kxh5, and white is either going to stop the black e pawn with his king and maintain connected passers or promote first with his b (or a) pawn.


8

Zugzwang. OK, one word is a bit short for an answer. :-) Still, I would win that one for White probably on blitz time. Note that Black has only one passer and your knight easily can put a cork to that. Thus, with still one minute on the clock: Play the N to f4 to kill Ph5. Black of course will object to that, playing Pe5 in time. Fine, then play the N to d3....


7

As you rightly point out Kc4 is forced for white and then whichever king has to move first loses. It is worth quickly checking if white can abandon the d5 pawn and go for the a5 with the intention of queening the a4 pawn. You do this by counting to see who queens first. For white it goes Kb5, Kxa5, Kb4 (to threaten the c pawn), a5, a6, a7, a8=Q - 7 moves. ...


8

I think I need to first clear up a misconception you have: Forcing a mate with only one rook is impossible so white has no choice BUT to promote to a queen. I eventually took his pawn. The best case scenario is a draw for him now. This is false. A king and rook can, in fact, force checkmate upon a lone king. You should learn the technique ASAP. (It may be ...


1

Various authors have used the terms key squares and critical squares differently. In some places Muller & Lamprecht's explanation is only fair. The confusion is that these terms have been used for two concepts. The first is the square the attacking king must occupy to queen his pawn in a K vs K-P endgame. This is well described above. The second concept ...


2

In a pawn and king vs king endgame, key squares are those that guarantee a win. If the pawn is on e3 for example, the key squares for white are d5, e5, and f5. Critical squares (I think) are those where the king must get to promote the pawn (e.g., d7 or f7).


11

Very simple. Learn endgames. If you knew much about endgames then you would know that in rook and pawn endgames your rook belongs behind your passed pawn. Knowing that on move 39 you wouldn't have played the pointless Kd5. Instead you would have played 39...a5 with the intention of following this with 40...a4 41...Ra5 and then just keep pushing the a pawn. ...


3

Q: How long is the longest forced checkmate in chess? A: We will probably never know, but a naive extrapolation from known data might suggest about 18 billion moves. 50/75 move-rules don't apply Firstly, let's definitively remove one distraction: 50-moves (or 75-moves). The Codex for Chess Problem Compositions states: Footnote 12. Presently the rules ...


3

Here you can find a mate in 555 moves by Lutz Neweklowsky: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70FmRGd4qqU&ab_channel=LutzNeweklowsky In this kind of chesscompositions we don't have a 50-move-rule. Kind regards, Lutz Neweklowsky


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