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1

Stockfish with tablebases gives flat 0.00 so it seems highly likely to be a draw. A problem for White is they can't even take the c6 pawn with the king, 1.Kc7 Qh2+ 2.Kxc6 is a draw. So since Black can just keep giving checks and force the white king on awkward squares this seems hard to ever be winning. (especially since Black can always threaten to pick up ...


3

Could someone please confirm that he became a stronger player by using that method of studying? I can confirm, I was 2000-FIDE, struggling to beat players of the same rating. After a month of serious endgame study, I increased my rating to 2200 fairly quickly. Since then, I am continuously studying endgames. A lot of players at that level have a gap in their ...


2

Nice mate! [Event "Forced Mate in 5"] [Date "2020.11.05"] [White "White"] [Black "Black"] [WhiteElo "2622"] [BlackElo "2622"] [Annotator "Bateman, David"] [FEN "2r1qbnr/1b4p1/p2pNk1p/npp1pP2/4P1Q1/2PPB3/PP4PP/RN3RK1 b - - 0 1"] [SourceVersionDate "2020.11.19"]


2

The position appears to be a win for White. To win the position White needs to bring their king. So the first step of a the winning plan is to put the white rook to f4. The position after a rook trade is easily winning for White, so Black's response would have to be to defend f7 from the 7th rank. For instance: 1.Ra4 Re2 2.Rf4 Re7 Now White can bring their ...


0

Without running any analysis. I can't see any moves that are deemed "Strong" for black. I ran a quick computer analysis through three engines and in each instance white is winning in the starting position; Results - Starting Position ~Stockfish 12 : +2.32 ~Leela Zero : +2.31 ~Komodo Dragon : +2.44 The below is the best result for black is the ...


2

BCE (Basic Chess Endings) by Fine was the one I used. It is long out of print. There are some newer books but I can't say which of them might be good now. Also online has the sort of info you want and would be easier to find what you think is good for you.


5

Three options I can think of immediately: https://chess-endgame-trainer.firebaseapp.com/home is a fantastic chess endgame trainer. Chessable also lets you create your own courses (for free) which you can then do spaced repetition on. Listudy is another option.


2

I would strongly suggest looking into chess.com as they have an extensive "Learning" module on end game and end game tactics. You are limited to the amount of modules you can complete per day unless you are willing to pay for a subscription. This isn't necessarily a bad thing as learning to much can result in concepts not necessarily taking hold. ...


2

Technically, you could add an extra piece to the well-known mate in 549 position, thereby adding at least a move or two. But I suppose by "proven," you wish for an endgame that has been verified by the usual brute force. In that sense, the longest candidate that I know of for a proven 8 piece position checkmating sequence is a mere 64 moves long. ...


2

b4 fixes the black pawns a to c, because they cannot advance without support. In the original position, 1. b4 would not fix the pawns. Black could play ...b6 followed by ...c5 at the right moment. After 2. ...a6, ...b6 is not possible anymore without support. And without ...b6, ...c5 is not possible. So the black pawns need support by their King or Rook to ...


1

It does not fix the pawns directly. As black pawns can still move without being captured. But it ensures that black cannot force a passed pawn even if they sacrificed one pawn to do it.


3

b4 is just weak here. Instead 1. Re7 (get your rooks on the 7th rank!) almost wins on spot. One can then try 2. b4 according to what black plays.


6

It definitely prevents Black from playing ...c5, at least temporarely. I wouldn't say Black pawns are "fixed" though. Anyway, isn't Re7 a much stronger move?


5

Black doesn't actually wins a piece. After 1.Rb8 Kg7 2.g5!? Nxe2, White will parry the check by playing 3.Kf1, when both the Bf6 and the Ne2 are under attack. You cannot save both pieces with 3...Nd4 attacking f3 and hoping for 4.Nxd4? Bxd4 because 4.gf6 is check. As a consequence, Black wins a pawn and retains a winning position, but he doesn't pocket a ...


-5

White is a patzer. Or this was a very fast speed game or he was in severe time trouble. Or the position is wrong. After white g5, black plays nxr and white plays pxb losing the exchange. white has no way to mate with the horsies and black wins easily.


4

This is an easy position for Stockfish with tablebase, but very hard without it. The only way Stockfish can work out it's a draw is search all the way through 50-move draw. Otherwise, it'd think the position is winning for Black because Black has a knight up. Your browser may not have the capability to search such high depth. That's exactly the reason why we ...


15

Depth 64 means 64 half moves, it includes moves both by white and black. It isn't close to being able detect draws by means of the 50 move rule (100 plies). Especially since that is only the depth of the deepest line in the search, and to conclude it was certainly a draw, Stockfish would have to look at a huge number of lines that all eventually draw by the ...


3

Is this a stamina issue? (as in I start to lose concentration as the game goes on?) No. If you are consistently reaching the endgame then it is a "lack of endgame knowledge" problem. Do you know when KP v K is a win and when it is a draw? Do you know how to win the Capablanca pawn endgame as white? Do you know what you have to do as black to draw (...


3

As with any matter on the laws of chess, the application of the laws is to some degree at the discretion of the arbiter. Therefore, the result may be different whether the arbiter is sympathetic or unsympathetic towards your position. If the arbiter is sympathetic one course of action may be to use 7.4b: ... for the first two illegal moves by a player the ...


0

Why would you want to claim a draw when you can win? Would someone turn down a draw when they are obviously going to lose based on the material? To answer the question: to protect people from their own bad ideas.


-1

Actually, if one has particular material that can checkmate a lone king (for example: anything except a single knight or bishop), one CAN force one's opponent to take the material or allow stalemate. A queen is obvious: chase the king down to one end or side of the board, then place the queen on the square "in front of" the king. For a rook or ...


23

Why is there no rule allowing a player to claim a draw in lonely king endgames? For the simple reason that there is no need. If you are the player with the extra material you can offer a draw and be almost guaranteed that your opponent will accept the offer. If you have an opponent who is ignorant of the rules you can walk away and let your clock time ...


4

That excerpt from Wikipedia doesn't necessarily cover all cases where one can claim a draw. I haven't checked how this applies to FIDE specifically, but in many tournaments with no increment/delay, you can claim a draw if it's clear you can stop your opponent from winning. For example, in a king and rook vs king and rook, most good TDs would accept your ...


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