New answers tagged

16

All is fair in love, war, and blitz (at least with regards to winning on time, and short of outright cheating). In blitz, time is a major factor in the game, and it is fine to try and win on time in any situation. If you used too much time, and your opponent thinks he can flag you, there is nothing wrong with that. It is part of the game. I have seen ...


8

There is nothing wrong with winning on time. You just have to understand the risk loosing game by position. In a competition time is also the factor. To avoid brutal play on time Fisher and similar time controls where invented, but if your competition uses old style controls without increment is totally fine to win on time, especially a blitz game. Managing ...


11

Phonon's answer is great, and I might not otherwise try to add anything, but I thought that adding Anand's own words might be worthy. In particular, of note, is that his "bad" Be7 holds his position together while his rooks go to work. This is not uncommon in Sicilian lines with d6 and e5 (and f6), and worth remembering if you play similar lines. So, here ...


31

In short, the key idea is to prevent white from playing h2-h3! Bc4 forces the exchange of light square bishops, and thus, sets up Rh3 which blocks the h2 pawn and keeps both the h2 and g4 pawns weak. Concretely, the only piece currently covering h3 is the light squared bishop on f1, so by trading the bishop with Bc4, which white cannot prevent as Bg2 leaves ...


2

Let \path\to\endgame\tablebase\files be ... the path to endgame tablebase files. This means that the directory should contains only tablebase files, and not for instance folder for up to 5 pieces tablebase files and a folder for 6 pieces tablebase files. The files are .rtbw or .rtbz files. (These are Syzygy files, I don't know how it works for Gaviotta files ...


10

As a complement to previous answers, notice that although this endgame should be a theoretical win for the bishops, it is not as straightforward a technical task as one might think. Even at the highest level, in a World Championship Match, Black has been able to save his skin. The stakes were very high, since this rapid game was played during the tiebreak ...


9

Of course, this should be a win. Here is how future GM Robert Cvek did it as a 2265-rated player starting at move 33. The position is not exactly the same, but it is pretty close. He struggled for a little bit in the beginning, but then, he managed to bring his king up using the bishops to block the rook checks as Initial Ignorance mentioned, and then it ...


7

The key is to create weaknesses in Black's position, while also not exchanging off too much material. For example, if you exchanged down and got a K+B+B+h-pawn vs K+R, Black could sacrifice his rook for your dark-squared bishop, resulting in the wrong bishop drawn endgame. My strategy would be to fix Black's pawns on a certain colour complex, ideally ...


0

No. If that were possible then KN could stalemate the lone King by force (WTM 1 Nb5, 2 Na7, 3 Nc6; BTM Kb7 2 Kc6 Ka8 3 Kb5! Ka7 4 Ka5 etc.), and I already checked (as reported in this answer) that stalemate cannot be forced in general.


3

I think that is limited to just a few positions. A lone king vs. king. king and bishop vs. king. A king and bishop vs. king and same colored bishop as the other side. A king and multiple bishops of the same color vs. king. A king and knight vs. king. Any barrier position, where neither side can cross over to the other side. Even king and knight vs. king ...


1

Unless the opponent has at least one pawn (in KNN vs K), you are not able to reach checkmate because stalemate should occur first. This is the reason that the position is a draw. However, in KNN vs KP or KNN vs KPP, for example, there is some possibility that the pawn can take away moves from its own King. This is why the checkmate can sometimes be forced.


1

It depends a lot since if you are playing a bullet game then he might expect blunders so he might not be resigning so, in this case, it is a little rude to ask him to resign. On the other hand, if it's a rapid or classical game and your opponent isn't resigning then perhaps it's disrespectable on his part. I would still say that you shouldn't be asking ...


16

Well, simply put, they chose to follow the USCF "Article 14: The Drawn Game rule 14E: Insufficient material to win on time, 14E3: King and two knights." While it is not a forced mate, there is a mating position that is possible, thus they could have easily followed the FIDE rule, and allowed the side with the knights to continue playing. It was probably a ...


11

The rules applied on chess.com are explained here. Basically the rule says that if there are no pawns and the material is insufficient to force a mate on the lone king, then the game is declared a draw. This is contrary to FIDE rules and leads to some positions that are actually winning by force being declared draws, as noted here by Nigel Short. Actually, ...


1

I found a game where castling takes place on the 40th move in a postion that is truly that of an endgame. Tim Krabbe lists as the 103rd most fantastic move in chess history. [Title "Viktors Pupols-Jerald Meyers, Lone Pine California USA, 3/13/1976"] [FEN ""] [startply "78"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d5 g6 4.c4 b5 5.cxb5 a6 6.bxa6 Bxa6 7.Nc3 Bg7 8.Bg5 h6 9.Bd2 O-...


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