New answers tagged

2

This is an easy draw thanks to the opposite-colored Bishops, each of which defends all of its own side's pawns and cannot attack the opponent's, so neither side can make any progress. Black's extra pawn is academic. Black to move can force the draw by just moving the King "randomly", keeping the Bishop on d4 where it already defends both the d4 and ...


3

In addition to the other answer, you can see the results from Stockfish 13+ NNUE at depth = 78 (half moves, so 39 moves). All lines are evaluated at 0.0 (Position on Lichess). This is a draw (with perfect play). There is no way to make progress. There's always enough time for the other side to hold against your attempt to make progress. Note: diagrams below ...


6

Preface: When two players agree to play a timed game, they have agreed to take a loss if their timer ends before they can defeat their opponent. As such, time is a resource that affects every such match - time management should not be considered secondary to advantage on the board. Chess skill is not simply about being able to find the right moves, it's ...


13

If you are sure not to make it over 50 moves for a draw, another option not yet mentioned is to try to trick your opponent. Likely they will also premove. For example if in a R+K vs R+K you are both moving the king around at some point prepare to move your rook to attack their rook even in an undefended way. Chances are they will have premoved the king and ...


2

Yes it is a draw. The most basic thing about this game is that only black can push(or try) for a win. So if I see this position from black prospective only one idea come to my mind for pushing:- Bringing black king to b5 or a5 and then pushing e4 hoping white will capture from pawn or from bishop but because of white king having squares like e4,d3,d5,f5 ...


45

K+R vs. K+R is a draw, but K+R+10 sec vs. K+R+20 sec is not a draw. Your opponent won because they had an advantage brought on by having better time management. Nothing to complain about -- time is an essential resource (sometimes more important than material) in blitz (or similar) chess. The only real answer to your question "How could I have better ...


4

Exchange off all the pawns, and enough material to ensure that your opponent no longer has enough material to checkmate you (e.g. your opponent just has a king + bishop versus your king). Find a repetition of position and repeat it three times, e.g. a perpetual check, or a forcing sequence where your opponent can only break the sequence to their disadvantage....


1

I would say you gave yourself an answer. If a computer analysis with depth 43 does not find a clear solution, the game would end probably in a draw if both sides play perfectly. Nevertheless, this situation is extremely complicated to analyze for a human and therefore I would say that for both sides a win is possible. If you would like to know how to advance ...


2

Since this position has less than 6 pieces, the full checkmating line can be produced with the Shredder's online 6 piece DTM tablespace. Here is the full checkmating line that I obtained by playing through it. [FEN "8/5p2/5k2/8/3K2p1/6P1/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kd5 Kf5 2. Kd4 Ke6 3. Ke4 f5+ 4. Kf4 Kf6 5. Ke3 Ke5 6. Kd3 f4 7. Ke2 f3+ 8. Ke1 f2+ 9. Kxf2 ...


2

As long ago as 1895 KNNNvKN was treated as winning: [Title "Moritz Lewitt; Deutsches Wochenschach 14 Jul 1895"] [fen "3K2NN/8/8/8/8/8/1P6/n2k4 w - - 0 1"] [StartFlipped "0"] 1.b4 Nc2 2. b5 Na3 3. b6 Nc4 4. b7 Na5 5. b8=N! FEN: 3K2NN/8/8/8/8/8/1P6/n2k4 This is in PDB with no further moves given, even though the bK is out of ...


4

To assume that the game has reached the endgame just because the Queens have been exchanged is a bad conceptual mistake that can lead to disaster. A classic example is a game Verlinski-Alekhine where Queens are traded very early in the game and white plays the early middlegame "as if" it was an endgame already with the result of getting run over by ...


6

Some say the endgame begins when the kings can come out and join the fight. Usually it's not safe for them to do so until queens are off the board.


1

Topalov's 47. .. Bh3!? is not a novel concept, but the assumed 48. gxh3? gives up the game. Proper play doesn't give Black the third and overwhelming passed pawn. The thematic-in-opposite-color-bishops draw is held with 48. g3 followed by bringing the king out to prevent the Black's king from invaded holds the draw.


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