Hot answers tagged

68

It's checkmate in 20 moves. White's queens circle around the board giving checks, and Black interposes horizontally/vertically moving pieces. Black only has one choice because the other piece is pinned from the previous check. That goes well, until the pawn needs to move sideways: [FEN "3Q4/7Q/3rp3/2rkr3/2rrr3/7K/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qb7+ Rc6 2. Qa5+...


51

I believe that the game you speak of is the extremely famous Lasker-Thomas match in which Lasker forces Black to accept his queen "sacrifice" on move 11. It is followed by a king hunt in which Black's king is forced to the last rank by White, who then finishes the game with the king giving a discovered check from the unmoved a8 rook. The game is ...


39

White is one tempo short of catching the pawn - if White could make two moves immediately it would be a draw as white would just take the black pawn. But they can't, so white has to find a threat which black has to respond to which gains them that move. The only threat they can make is to queen their pawn, and apparently black can stop that with their bishop ...


35

This position is a draw, the game is over. It is not possible for either side to checkmate the other from this position, not even if the side with the bare king would try to help. The same is true for king and knight vs king. A single knight or bishop without any pawns or other pieces is not enough to win the game. With king and two knights vs king it is in ...


32

The position given by Akavall is indeed a draw by perpetual, but it's a bit difficult to see because White has many different options at some moves. They can even choose to sacrifice the h2 queen, which effectively ends the perpetual (but it's still a draw). A position where this is much easier to see is the following one: [FEN "5k2/8/8/8/8/5q2/7Q/6QK w ...


26

The simple and obvious answer is that it all depends on the position of black's pawns and king. In general the further up the board the pawns the better for black provided the king is in contact with the pawns, preferably in front of them. Worth pointing out that the position you give is winning for white because the pawns aren't far enough forward. From ...


26

OK The check must come from the knight (D'uh!) The black king must be on c5 for the mate The white king must be used to cover any empty squares to the right of the black king - thus the white king must move, thus there must be at least one non-checking move On a non-checking move Black can try to release the prison by Ra4 The only way white can cover this ...


24

If White can get the Black king to the first rank, then it will not be fast enough to catch the g-pawn from promoting. White starts by playing 1. Qg5, and after 1...Kh7 2. Qf6 Kg8 3. Qh6, the White queen can simply imitate the Black king's movements until she can start forcing the king down towards the first rank. [FEN "7k/8/8/8/6p1/4QpPb/5PpP/6K1 w - -...


23

Why is there no rule allowing a player to claim a draw in lonely king endgames? For the simple reason that there is no need. If you are the player with the extra material you can offer a draw and be almost guaranteed that your opponent will accept the offer. If you have an opponent who is ignorant of the rules you can walk away and let your clock time ...


15

Depth 64 means 64 half moves, it includes moves both by white and black. It isn't close to being able detect draws by means of the 50 move rule (100 plies). Especially since that is only the depth of the deepest line in the search, and to conclude it was certainly a draw, Stockfish would have to look at a huge number of lines that all eventually draw by the ...


14

First, Then Meanwhile [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h4 Qa2 3. h5 Qa1 4. h6 Qa2 5. h7 Qa1 6. h8=N Qa2 7. Ng6 Qa1 8. Ne5 Qa2 9. Nxc4 Qa1 10. Na5 c4 11. Nxc4 Qa2 12. Na5 Qa1 13. Nxb3# However, So let's try [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h3 Qa2 3. h4 Qa1 4. ...


14

considering my 41.75 per cent winning chance, how do I have to play in order to defeat my opponent if he/she and I both get a queen? First of all you need to understand what is meant by "41.75% winning chance". It does NOT mean that your chances of winning are 41.75%. What it means is that in 41.75% of the games considered the game ended in a win ...


13

Intuitive plan Notice that black's last check is pushing the white king one row away from their passed e-pawn. Once black promotes the b-pawn, white will have to give up the rook for it. After which white's king is simply not in position to cover the advance of the e-pawn and therefore additional tempi will have to be spent with king moves to try and reach ...


13

This is a very common kind of endgame, where you have a pawn majority on one side and fight against a single pawn in the center. Winning this is not difficult, but let's first look at your game... You fixed the position of the queenside pawns by playing b6 (to which white cleverly replied b5 ran with your king towards the queenside Basically you should ...


13

Yes, it is possible. Here is an example: [Variant "From Position"] [FEN "5k2/1Q6/8/8/7q/8/8/6QK w - - 0 1"] 1. Qh2 Qe1+ 2. Kg2 Qe2+ 3. Kg3 Qe5+ 4. Kh3 Qh5+ 5. Kg2 Qe2+


13

Generally speaking, it's a draw. Most pawnless endgames are drawn, unless one side has a material advantage of more than a minor piece. Either side can win if there are short-term tactics. To check the outcome of a position, you can use an online tablebase. In particular, it's nice to view the longest wins for either side, which are (according to this page) ...


13

When a "total newbie" achieves such an overwhelming position against a computer, it most probably means that the computer was forced to make a "sub-optimal" move from time to time - to give the player a chance to win the game. The problem is that the computer has no clue what is a "reasonable" mistake from a human point of view. ...


12

As I do not have access to the full Lomosonov tablebases, here is an answer based on the Syzygy tablebases, which are available online in machine-readable format. I interpret your question as "how often does the side to move win, lose or draw". As the Syzygy tablebases only include positions where White has material advantage, we have to add the ...


12

I'm not sure about the fastest checkmate, but this should be the general procedure: Then Black After


11

You have three choices: Always play with an increment, then this won't arise because you can always move within the increment Try and fork your opponent's king and knight. Either he takes your knight or you take his knight next move - result = draw. Or the best and simplest with so much time left Just play very fast until you have made 50 moves without any ...


11

After white plays the first move in the forced sequence, black's best move (with USCF rules) would be to let the clock run out because it would be a draw. No, it wouldn't be a draw if there was a forced mate and the losing side ran the clock out. Under USCF rule 14E: The game is drawn even when a player exceeds the time limit if one of the following ...


11

Very simple. Learn endgames. If you knew much about endgames then you would know that in rook and pawn endgames your rook belongs behind your passed pawn. Knowing that on move 39 you wouldn't have played the pointless Kd5. Instead you would have played 39...a5 with the intention of following this with 40...a4 41...Ra5 and then just keep pushing the a pawn. ...


10

In short, the plan you proposed is possible, but it is just too slow, even if black allows it, which is not mandatory. If black permits it, here is a simple win that, although I checked it with a computer, I could see it in my head fairly easily, which means those two could see it that much more easily. [FEN "8/8/1R4p1/4P1P1/2r2K1p/7P/1p6/2k5 w - - 0 1"] ...


10

This is indeed a draw. You can check such positions with 7 or fewer pieces in the Sygyzy tablebases to see if they are a draw, a win, or a loss. If you want the depth to mate for 6 pieces or fewer, use the Shredder databases. However, I suppose would like to know why this is a draw. If White was trying to win, the best option is to take Black’s pawn of ...


10

Possible queen and any other piece The queen can on its own push the king to the edge of the board by following it a knight-distance away and making use of zugzwang. Once on the edge, it is easy to bring the second piece and mate with the queen in front of the king. The only exception would be if the second piece is a pawn on the next to last row Example ...


10

You can do something like this in SCID, which is a free program. It takes a little effort, but it's not too bad. First, load the desired database. Then use a filter to select only games from the opening of your choice. You can filter either by a position, or by ECO code, to get the desired opening. Note how many games meet the filter criteria. Next, use the &...


10

If your opponent's pieces aren't well positioned and/or their king is in danger, it's important to refrain from exchanging pieces (generally). The reason is that each of your pieces has a higher relative value than their opposites. They tend to control more space, or have more opportunities to prove dangerous to the enemy king. Assuming it's White to move (...


10

If the tablebase says that it's a draw with optimal play from both sides, then you can always ignore whatever Stockfish or any other engine says. The tablebase knows the objective evaluation for any position with 7 pieces or less. What Stockfish 11 (or any earlier version) does is calculate as far as it can ahead, evaluate the positions it reaches in its ...


10

First of all, White wins in the diagram you provide, although it's not obvious at a glance how. White plays Qf2 first to stop the king from advancing. Black can't just sit there forever because the White king will eventually eat that a-pawn and come back, so they have to play h4, and then another pawn move. If Black plays g3, White responds with Qf3, and now ...


10

So white obviously has to start with Then, So [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h3 {Queen is on black, so the pawn goes to white! Now we keep it that way} Qa2 3. h4 Qa1 4. h5 Qa2 5. h6 Qa1 6. h7 Qa2 7. h8=N Qa1 8. Ng6 Qa2 9. Ne5 Qa1 10. Nd7 Qa2 11. Nxc5 Qa1 12. Na4 Qa2 13. Nb6 Qa1 14. Nxc4 Qa2 15. Na5 Qa1 ...


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