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59

In this game Kasparov is showing a perfect demonstration of the triangulation technique in order to Zugzwang the white king. To be in a Zugzwang means, any move loses or more generally, worsens your position, and one cannot simply pass the turn and maintain the position. In the diagrammed position, the key idea to spot is that white would be in Zugzwang ...


52

Is it rude to ask my opponent to resign an online game when they have a lost endgame? Yes, it is rude, although you are in good company. In one Olympiad Victor Korchnoi is alleged to have asked his opponent - "Do you speak English?" When they said "Yes" he replied "Then please resign". I may be misquoting. He may not have said "please" :-) Strictly ...


39

White is one tempo short of catching the pawn - if White could make two moves immediately it would be a draw as white would just take the black pawn. But they can't, so white has to find a threat which black has to respond to which gains them that move. The only threat they can make is to queen their pawn, and apparently black can stop that with their bishop ...


35

Brian Towers answered the question, but to help you understand why people don't resign, I recommend you watch this lecture by GM Finegold Blunders, with GM Ben Finegold. The gist of it is: Never resign, and look for resources no matter how bad your position is. And when you are winning, don't let your guard down.


31

It's always rude to ask your opponent to resign. They should resign of their own accord once they're convinced that you're overwhelmingly likely to win the game. In my case, that always meant you'd have to convince me that you knew how to play the endgame in question and that both of us knew how you would win it. If your opponent hasn't resigned yet, it ...


29

In short, the key idea is to prevent white from playing h2-h3! Bc4 forces the exchange of light square bishops, and thus, sets up Rh3 which blocks the h2 pawn and keeps both the h2 and g4 pawns weak. Concretely, the only piece currently covering h3 is the light squared bishop on f1, so by trading the bishop with Bc4, which white cannot prevent as Bg2 leaves ...


21

Honestly it's rude to ask your opponent to resign in any position. The one exception may be them deliberately letting their clock run to 0 in a completely lost position, but in this case they're being deliberately malicious and you can't really hope to reason with them. Even though you're absolutely justified in thinking your opponent should resign, that ...


16

This was a great game! Hou Yifan brilliantly outplayed her opponent Fabiano Caruana in a very positional middle game, and mind you using the Petroff's defence in the opening, which is Caruana's specialty by any stretch of the word! The endgame was very tricky, and Caruana proved his resilience and held the game to a draw in a very resourceful way, despite ...


15

You might know that you are playing a game that is already decided, but your opponent might not. Your opponent might not realize that the position you now have is a won endgame. Even if your opponent realizes it, she might not be convinced that you know that you already won and that you know what mistakes you need to avoid in order to win. So they believe ...


15

Well, simply put, they chose to follow the USCF "Article 14: The Drawn Game rule 14E: Insufficient material to win on time, 14E3: King and two knights." While it is not a forced mate, there is a mating position that is possible, thus they could have easily followed the FIDE rule, and allowed the side with the knights to continue playing. It was probably a ...


15

All is fair in love, war, and blitz (at least with regards to winning on time, and short of outright cheating). In blitz, time is a major factor in the game, and it is fine to try and win on time in any situation. If you used too much time, and your opponent thinks he can flag you, there is nothing wrong with that. It is part of the game. I have seen ...


14

tl;dr: "Yes." Discussion: Technically, this position is governed by the basic concept of the "Outside Passed Pawn" and the winning method is to use that pawn to restrict the opposing king's ability to defend the other pawns on the board. The purest expression of that concept is in David's answer, which is to just use the one pawn and leave the other as a ...


13

Note: This is an analysis of the position at move 34. Obviously, White's play in the beginning of the endgame was poor and he should never have entered such trouble. Black's advantage is clear and long-lived because he has the better minor piece, a knight vs a bad bishop with a locked center. Whether this advantage is enough for a win requires analysis, of ...


13

Intuitive plan Notice that black's last check is pushing the white king one row away from their passed e-pawn. Once black promotes the b-pawn, white will have to give up the rook for it. After which white's king is simply not in position to cover the advance of the e-pawn and therefore additional tempi will have to be spent with king moves to try and reach ...


13

This is a very common kind of endgame, where you have a pawn majority on one side and fight against a single pawn in the center. Winning this is not difficult, but let's first look at your game... You fixed the position of the queenside pawns by playing b6 (to which white cleverly replied b5 ran with your king towards the queenside Basically you should ...


12

Overall, that is totally fine, and it worked great. That said, without a detailed calculation of any promotion and stalemate possibilities on the k-side, the easiest win will be running to b2 and just queening the a-pawn since you may well have to do that anyway. That is best done with the p on g6 still far away, and white cannot ignore it, so he has to go ...


10

First, cheer up, this is not an easy endgame and you should not kick yourself for missing a winning move. That said, it is possible to see that 34...Kf5 is your best bet. I'm not a particularly strong player, but: The queenside is locked. You can't make progress based solely on the pawn structure. If White plays a5 you'll never get through. Given enough ...


10

First, the good: You are probably winning this throughout the game, and thus, improving your position gradually was the perfect plan. It also was one of the best examples of Shereshevsky's "Do Not Hurry" principle that I have ever seen. Black could do nothing, so gradually improving, and eventually converting, was perfect since you had all the time in the ...


10

In short, the plan you proposed is possible, but it is just too slow, even if black allows it, which is not mandatory. If black permits it, here is a simple win that, although I checked it with a computer, I could see it in my head fairly easily, which means those two could see it that much more easily. [FEN "8/8/1R4p1/4P1P1/2r2K1p/7P/1p6/2k5 w - - 0 1"] ...


10

This is indeed a draw. You can check such positions with 7 or fewer pieces in the Sygyzy tablebases to see if they are a draw, a win, or a loss. If you want the depth to mate for 6 pieces or fewer, use the Shredder databases. However, I suppose would like to know why this is a draw. If White was trying to win, the best option is to take Black’s pawn of ...


10

You can do something like this in SCID, which is a free program. It takes a little effort, but it's not too bad. First, load the desired database. Then use a filter to select only games from the opening of your choice. You can filter either by a position, or by ECO code, to get the desired opening. Note how many games meet the filter criteria. Next, use ...


10

As I do not have access to the full Lomosonov tablebases, here is an answer based on the Syzygy tablebases, which are available online in machine-readable format. I interpret your question as "how often does the side to move win, lose or draw". As the Syzygy tablebases only include positions where White has material advantage, we have to add the ...


9

If the king is on the sixth and the pawn is on the fifth (and it's not a rook pawn), then it's a win for the side with the pawn, no matter who has the move: [FEN "4k3/8/4K3/4P3/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kd6 Kd8 2. e6 Ke8 3. e7 Kf7 4. Kd7 Kf6 5. e8=Q * With Black to move: [FEN "4k3/8/4K3/4P3/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... Kd8 2. Kf7 Kd7 3. e6+ Kd8 4. e7+ ...


9

This position has six pieces on the board, and is hence present in a number of chess endgame tablebases. For example, the Syzygy tablebases show that this position is a theoretical draw, but that there is only one move which guarantees the draw: Kc8. All other moves allow black to force a win. [FEN "1K6/1P3q2/1P6/P7/3k4/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kc8 Qe8+ 2. ...


9

Why don't you resign instead? It's a question that looks like it has an obvious answer: because I'm winning! But that begs the question "who cares?" Let the game end. What happens? Your record goes up by 1 win, and you get some rating points. In the end, other than the sheer enjoyment of the game, that's the only real consequence. A few bits in a ...


9

White is in zugzwang so the basic idea of forcing white back using the pawns for extra tempos is perfectly correct. You still need to figure out how to queen without stalemating but you have the right idea.


9

Phonon's answer is great, and I might not otherwise try to add anything, but I thought that adding Anand's own words might be worthy. In particular, of note, is that his "bad" Be7 holds his position together while his rooks go to work. This is not uncommon in Sicilian lines with d6 and e5 (and f6), and worth remembering if you play similar lines. So, here ...


9

You cannot get a definitive answer, but in all likelihood, 99.99% it is a draw no matter who is to move (I am the type of person, who never says I am positive unless there is 100% proof, and that is impossible here, however likely). The overwhelming factor in this position is that the black bishop does not control the a1 square, so even if white had no ...


9

The key here is zugzwang - White has an ideal defensive position at the moment, his king stops yours penetrating, his bishop covers the weak pawns on g4 and c4, and the pawn on a5 you can't easily get at is it is on a black square. BUT when white has to move he will either have to move his king (letting your king in), or move his bishop (leaving a pawn ...


9

Let's note the following: 1.Rxc2 and 1.Kxf4 and 1.Rd8+ are equally good, since they all draw. If we ignore 1.Rd8+ for now, 1.Rxc2 is clearly at least as good as 1.Kxf4 in the position, since it drives black's king back one square, meaning that black will at some point have to 'waste' a move with the king to get to white's remaining pawns (the option of 1.Rd8+...


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