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49

Is it rude to ask my opponent to resign an online game when they have a lost endgame? Yes, it is rude, although you are in good company. In one Olympiad Victor Korchnoi is alleged to have asked his opponent - "Do you speak English?" When they said "Yes" he replied "Then please resign". I may be misquoting. He may not have said "please" :-) Strictly ...


41

It's quite a fun problem to think about, before getting to the calculation of long variations, try to first spot the key idea needed to crack the problem. Here are the first observations that come to my mind which eventually led me to spot the solution, let's break them down step by step: a) With our bishop eyeing g7 and our doubled pawn formation on g6-g7,...


34

Brian Towers answered the question, but to help you understand why people don't resign, I recommend you watch this lecture by GM Finegold Blunders, with GM Ben Finegold. The gist of it is: Never resign, and look for resources no matter how bad your position is. And when you are winning, don't let your guard down.


31

In short, the key idea is to prevent white from playing h2-h3! Bc4 forces the exchange of light square bishops, and thus, sets up Rh3 which blocks the h2 pawn and keeps both the h2 and g4 pawns weak. Concretely, the only piece currently covering h3 is the light squared bishop on f1, so by trading the bishop with Bc4, which white cannot prevent as Bg2 leaves ...


29

It's always rude to ask your opponent to resign. They should resign of their own accord once they're convinced that you're overwhelmingly likely to win the game. In my case, that always meant you'd have to convince me that you knew how to play the endgame in question and that both of us knew how you would win it. If your opponent hasn't resigned yet, it ...


20

Honestly it's rude to ask your opponent to resign in any position. The one exception may be them deliberately letting their clock run to 0 in a completely lost position, but in this case they're being deliberately malicious and you can't really hope to reason with them. Even though you're absolutely justified in thinking your opponent should resign, that ...


16

Yes, given that the opponent helps the capturing side, it is possible to capture en passant two times or more in a row. Here's an example from a real game. Click on the arrows to view the game moves in forwards and backwards play. I have typed in a command to show the moment just before the two captures occur, specifically just before Black does the first ...


16

Well, simply put, they chose to follow the USCF "Article 14: The Drawn Game rule 14E: Insufficient material to win on time, 14E3: King and two knights." While it is not a forced mate, there is a mating position that is possible, thus they could have easily followed the FIDE rule, and allowed the side with the knights to continue playing. It was probably a ...


16

All is fair in love, war, and blitz (at least with regards to winning on time, and short of outright cheating). In blitz, time is a major factor in the game, and it is fine to try and win on time in any situation. If you used too much time, and your opponent thinks he can flag you, there is nothing wrong with that. It is part of the game. I have seen ...


13

You might know that you are playing a game that is already decided, but your opponent might not. Your opponent might not realize that the position you now have is a won endgame. Even if your opponent realizes it, she might not be convinced that you know that you already won and that you know what mistakes you need to avoid in order to win. So they believe ...


12

Overall, that is totally fine, and it worked great. That said, without a detailed calculation of any promotion and stalemate possibilities on the k-side, the easiest win will be running to b2 and just queening the a-pawn since you may well have to do that anyway. That is best done with the p on g6 still far away, and white cannot ignore it, so he has to go ...


12

tl;dr: "Yes." Discussion: Technically, this position is governed by the basic concept of the "Outside Passed Pawn" and the winning method is to use that pawn to restrict the opposing king's ability to defend the other pawns on the board. The purest expression of that concept is in David's answer, which is to just use the one pawn and leave the other as a ...


11

The game ended because of the 50-Move-Rule. From Wikipedia: The fifty-move rule in chess states that a player can claim a draw if no capture has been made and no pawn has been moved in the last fifty moves (for this purpose a "move" consists of a player completing their turn followed by the opponent completing their turn). The last capture was made by ...


11

The rules applied on chess.com are explained here. Basically the rule says that if there are no pawns and the material is insufficient to force a mate on the lone king, then the game is declared a draw. This is contrary to FIDE rules and leads to some positions that are actually winning by force being declared draws, as noted here by Nigel Short. Actually, ...


11

Phonon's answer is great, and I might not otherwise try to add anything, but I thought that adding Anand's own words might be worthy. In particular, of note, is that his "bad" Be7 holds his position together while his rooks go to work. This is not uncommon in Sicilian lines with d6 and e5 (and f6), and worth remembering if you play similar lines. So, here ...


10

Right now Black can only move his/her pawns. There are 1+4 moves left. To win, White needs the black king to capture the g7 pawn but not the g6 pawn. Therefore, the King must protect it (probably from f5). Let's try to get the king there: 1. Kb3 a4+ 2. Kc4 a3 3. Kd5 a1Q 4. Bxa1 a2 5. Ke5 (conveniently blocking the long diagonal) Kxg7 6. Kf5+ Now 6... Kg8 ...


10

They are programmed to play the best chess, and there is simply no programming added in that attempts to account for the opponent being low on time. The way it played it was the best chess-wise. A human might try to flag you, but not the computer. Personally, I like it that way.


10

As a complement to previous answers, notice that although this endgame should be a theoretical win for the bishops, it is not as straightforward a technical task as one might think. Even at the highest level, in a World Championship Match, Black has been able to save his skin. The stakes were very high, since this rapid game was played during the tiebreak ...


10

You cannot get a definitive answer, but in all likelihood, 99.99% it is a draw no matter who is to move (I am the type of person, who never says I am positive unless there is 100% proof, and that is impossible here, however likely). The overwhelming factor in this position is that the black bishop does not control the a1 square, so even if white had no ...


9

There are actually two zones, depending on which side of the pawn the black king is. If it's already in the corner, the zone is small: If the black king on the other side (towards the center), the zone is larger. The white queen can force the king to stand in front of the pawn, giving the white king an extra tempo to reach the 'small' zone above. (This also ...


9

If the king is on the sixth and the pawn is on the fifth (and it's not a rook pawn), then it's a win for the side with the pawn, no matter who has the move: [FEN "4k3/8/4K3/4P3/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kd6 Kd8 2. e6 Ke8 3. e7 Kf7 4. Kd7 Kf6 5. e8=Q * With Black to move: [FEN "4k3/8/4K3/4P3/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... Kd8 2. Kf7 Kd7 3. e6+ Kd8 4. e7+ ...


9

White is in zugzwang so the basic idea of forcing white back using the pawns for extra tempos is perfectly correct. You still need to figure out how to queen without stalemating but you have the right idea.


9

Of course, this should be a win. Here is how future GM Robert Cvek did it as a 2265-rated player starting at move 33. The position is not exactly the same, but it is pretty close. He struggled for a little bit in the beginning, but then, he managed to bring his king up using the bishops to block the rook checks as Initial Ignorance mentioned, and then it ...


8

This position has six pieces on the board, and is hence present in a number of chess endgame tablebases. For example, the Syzygy tablebases show that this position is a theoretical draw, but that there is only one move which guarantees the draw: Kc8. All other moves allow black to force a win. If this position were to occur in an actual game, the result ...


8

Why don't you resign instead? It's a question that looks like it has an obvious answer: because I'm winning! But that begs the question "who cares?" Let the game end. What happens? Your record goes up by 1 win, and you get some rating points. In the end, other than the sheer enjoyment of the game, that's the only real consequence. A few bits in a ...


8

Personally, I love a number of great books, and there is still no substitute. You can then plug positions into a computer to test yourself. I still love Fine's "Basic Chess Endings". Despite the errors, many corrected later in the Pal Benko edition, it gives a great sense of WHAT you are trying to accomplish in any type endgame. Simply by reading over all ...


8

There is nothing wrong with winning on time. You just have to understand the risk loosing game by position. In a competition time is also the factor. To avoid brutal play on time Fisher and similar time controls where invented, but if your competition uses old style controls without increment is totally fine to win on time, especially a blitz game. Managing ...


8

There is no valid human reason. The difference between Kc4 (mate in 12), and Kc2 (mate in 10) is fairly irrelevant. It simply appended the "?!" based on the algorithm that 10 is slightly worse than 12. Either way, it is, indeed, a simple win from there. By the way, my plan would be Rd7, then bring the king to h1/g1, and only then, bring the rook over via ...


7

Endgame studies are a particular form of tactical problem. I think variety is always good here, but, most importantly, since consistency is critical for improvement at chess, I would suggest you to focus on the type of exercise you enjoy most! (You won't train for too long if it's a sacrifice rather than a pleasure.) I disagree with the "tactics can lead to ...


7

Generally, the computer plays the moves leading to the best objective result. Taking the pawn or doing what you said both lead to a draw objectively, so there's no big reason to prefer one over the other. There are some adjustments that can be made to the engine, such as getting it to avoid repetitions early on (even if going for the early draw makes sense ...


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