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59

In this game Kasparov is showing a perfect demonstration of the triangulation technique in order to Zugzwang the white king. To be in a Zugzwang means, any move loses or more generally, worsens your position, and one cannot simply pass the turn and maintain the position. In the diagrammed position, the key idea to spot is that white would be in Zugzwang ...


17

This was a great game! Hou Yifan brilliantly outplayed her opponent Fabiano Caruana in a very positional middle game, and mind you using the Petroff's defence in the opening, which is Caruana's specialty by any stretch of the word! The endgame was very tricky, and Caruana proved his resilience and held the game to a draw in a very resourceful way, despite ...


13

First, the good: You are probably winning this throughout the game, and thus, improving your position gradually was the perfect plan. It also was one of the best examples of Shereshevsky's "Do Not Hurry" principle that I have ever seen. Black could do nothing, so gradually improving, and eventually converting, was perfect since you had all the time in the ...


11

Note: This is an analysis of the position at move 34. Obviously, White's play in the beginning of the endgame was poor and he should never have entered such trouble. Black's advantage is clear and long-lived because he has the better minor piece, a knight vs a bad bishop with a locked center. Whether this advantage is enough for a win requires analysis, of ...


10

You left out THE single biggest factor in the position, at least initially: The knight has zero mobility. That said, she did, indeed miss two opportunities to win involving a queening scenario, but they were very tricky for a human. I remember this endgame when they played it, and now, the winning idea comes back to me. [Event "Grenke Chess Classic 5th"] ...


9

What a beautiful domination of black's king by the knight and pawn setup on c5,e5, white is essentially up a king in this endgame! Given that black is completely unable to create any threats, you have all the tempi to centralize your king and aim for a specific setup thereafter. One potentially simpler plan that springs to mind is, targeting black's weak ...


8

First, cheer up, this is not an easy endgame and you should not kick yourself for missing a winning move. That said, it is possible to see that 34...Kf5 is your best bet. I'm not a particularly strong player, but: The queenside is locked. You can't make progress based solely on the pawn structure. If White plays a5 you'll never get through. Given enough ...


8

This is a stunning endgame. It is impressive how Kasparov perfectly used reserve tempi to reach the winning position in the diagram where triangulation is all that remains after Seirawan's 40. e4?? which was the last move of time-control. After this Seirawan is lost. Seirawan annotates this game in his book full of stories "Chess Duels : My Games with the ...


7

Your question meanders a lot, but I think what you are asking is, “What factors other than king centralization and piece activity are crucial to the endgame?” I have highlighted three areas below in bold that not more important than the other areas discussed, but just that they are not often discussed, so you can take note of them. You hit on a lot of them ...


7

In this position, black clearly is better with heavy pressure down the c-file, but it is clear that c4 is also well defended, and that black cannot bring any additional pressure on c4 except with d5. So, can black do anything else like try and infiltrate with Kg6-h5? I ran some logical lines with Stockfish, but they are labyrinth-like, and while it is clear ...


6

Your evaluation of the position is incorrect, and you are not better, so the idea that you have a win is out of the question with decent play. The white bishop is only partially bad. If he gets in e4, there are really only two pawns then fixed on dark squares. In fact, my initial gut feeling is that it is you, who has more opportunities to go wrong due to ...


5

It would be very helpful if you would post a couple of those games you mentioned that you gave up perpetual check. I would say, "no", there are no stock positions that are meant to avoid perpetual check (at least I cannot think of any now that I would call "common"). You just have to be careful, and be aware of king safety. Sometimes, you just cannot avoid ...


4

More often than not, the Bishop pair will compensate for doubled pawns in an endgame. Your unopposed bishop would have to be pretty bad (and therefore your overall position) if it's influence did not compensate. In general doubled-pawns are not that bad if you have active piece play. Look at the games from the Kasparov-Short world championship match. ...


3

You're overthinking a lot of details and missing the big picture. The first thing you look at in an endgame is the pawn structure. How many pawns on each side, passed pawns, potential passed pawns etc. Where are you able to create a passed pawn and how are you able to turn that into a win. Only after that do you consider the pieces. Try to trade into a ...


3

Much wisdom in all of the above, but nobody has yet mentioned the principle of two weaknesses. If the weaker side has a weak pawn that can be attacked, they will be limited in their freedom to manoeuvre, and may be squeezed into zugzwang. However the defender may be able to maintain a defence (Just by keeping a B on a certain diagonal for example) However, ...


3

There are two key factors in endgames which you haven't touched on. These are: Calculation Evaluation You need to be able to calculate very well. The endgame is generally the best area of the game for computers because calculation is basically what computers do best. Excellent calculation will allow you to work out the consequences of your alternative ...


3

The position with the longest known sequence away from checkmate haa a mate in 553 moves. It is a computer verified extension of the famous 549 mover (as mentioned in @Phishmaster's answer) found by Lutz Neweklowsky. By "verified," I mean Stockfish agrees with the moves that occur until a 7-piece position occurs, and then we know 100% it is correct from ...


2

After the Rook exchange you were clearly better. White has a very bad Bishop (which is much less valuable than your Knight) and no opportunity for initiative. Your doubled Pawn is no disadvantage because it cannot be attacked. Both your King and your Knight threaten to infiltrate the weak light squares. Your Knight can walk all over the board while White can ...


2

Winning! This is where you convert those small positional advantages into an actual win. Mating happens but is rare as the theme. Promoting a pawn is a big theme in many endgames. Gaining material so you can promote a pawn is important and often involves tactics. Subtlety such as the opposition and timing is important in many endgames. What looks ...


2

You seem to have everything covered. Do you have a sample game to share? Perhaps the challenge is to know when to convert one kind of advantage to another, or lack of knowledge of the basic end game positions like in a KRP vs KR ending when the pawn is on the fifth rank and the enemy king is cut off by one file... Maybe it is just that endgames are ...


1

It depends on the position, but a bishop is generally considered strong of play is on both sides of the boards and it's an open board. I would think that a sample position would help to understand what are you trying to point out.


1

White has a possible way to break in. Just one way. But there is a risk that white might lose if he does that. but the b on h8 is dead so it really does not cost that much to try. I have not analysed in depth so you run through an engine if you care. horsies on a3 and c3, bishop on b2 or c1 and Q on d3 or e2 or f1. and it looks like q on e2 and ...


1

It is a local rule and is not that popular outside a few small areas. In Spain there was a 20 move rule. THE rule is 50 moves, per the laws of chess, without any captures or pawn moves. In special cases more moves are allowed because of the difficulty of mating. One example is the wKKN vs KP endgame in which one knight blocks the pawn from moving while ...


1

I find Secrets of Pawnless Endings (Gambit, 2002) by John Nunn (pages 49 to 69) to be the ultimate reference about the KQvKR ending. All steps needed to force Philidor's 1777 position are described precisely, each position showing how to reduce to a previously seen position. The book of course covers stalemate cases (which are all obvious) and what I call "...


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