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16

Yes, given that the opponent helps the capturing side, it is possible to capture en passant two times or more in a row. Here's an example from a real game. Click on the arrows to view the game moves in forwards and backwards play. I have typed in a command to show the moment just before the two captures occur, specifically just before Black does the first ...


15

How can we teach this rule to a Beginner? (in a plain language or simplified way or associating any story to it) The history gives the story. At one time pawns could only move one square at a time even on the first move. But this made the game a bit slow. To speed it up the rule was changed to allow a pawn to move either one square, as before, or two ...


9

In simple words: if a pawn jumps two squares and lands right next to an opponent's pawn, then the opponent can capture that pawn in the following turn as if it had moved only 1 square. That is, only right after you made your jump, your opponent has the option to take by en passant, past that turn it is no longer allowed. So keywords to remember: two square ...


6

En-passant can only occur immediately after a pawn moves two squares from its starting square, where it could have been captured had it only moved one square. You cannot wait a move: if you choose not to immediately capture en-passant, you lose the ability to do so next move.


5

The point was to win the queen. Yes, White gets two passed pawns, but a passed pawn won't necessarily get to be promoted. Sure it happened in the game, but that's not really the point here.


4

After some research I could not find any "official" definition by a chess association/federation. This doesn't really surprise me, as there really is no need for a definition of "e.p. checkmate" to ensure correct play. However the general internet consensus on the usage of the term seems to agree on the following requirements: The game has to end with ...


3

Thanks, inspired by Brian's response, I have tried the following input: begi prot outputp.txt piec White Kf5 Qf8 Ph5 Black Kh7 Pg5 stip #1 opti enpa g7g6g5S next piec White Kf5 Pg4 Rf6 Black Kh4 Pf4 stip h#1 opti enpa g2g3g4 end which successfully gives the following outputs: 1.h5*g6 ep. # 1.f4*g3 ep. Rf6-h6 # So I think that's it. Thanks again.


3

The github page lists several help files in various languages: English, French and German. These are text files which can be downloaded. English is clearly not Thomas Maeder's mother tongue, I'm guessing German. Perhaps the German help file is clearer than the English. As far as I can tell from the English file there is a long list of options you can pass ...


2

Overall the game would be slower and opening attacks would be more aggressive at times at times. The purpose of implementing the double-step was to speed up the game. That way, those pesky pawns wouldn't have to waste so much time, i.e. moves, moving forward to mount an attack or to develop an area of advantage/control. But with the double-step gone, we ...


2

If nothing else, it does help to make similar looking pawn structures, behave similarly independent on which row they occur. For instance with en-passant: white: pawn h5, black pawns on h6, g7 would be somewhat equal to the position where white: pawn on h4, black pawns on h5, g6. Without en-passant however black would be able to achieve a protected ...


2

This is an important corner case for programming and also comes up in certain chess problems. I begin explanations by saying that castling and en passant are handled slightly differently, but don’t worry about this. Each is handled in the most sensible way. Ideally one would look ahead in the game to find out whether the moves are actually playable. For en ...


2

Although this question has been well answered, I wish to share a chess problem that uses the weird mechanism of the pawn being pinned by the taken pawn. Enjoy! This problem can be found here on Yet Another Chess Problem Database. [Title "Brunner, Erich Anselm, Deutsches Wochenschach (8515) 1908-12, White To Move And Selfmate Themselves"] [FEN "8/8/5Q2/...


2

I don't think it is defined at all. But in your first case, the pawn is delivering the mate. So I think that would be the 'en passant mate'. The 2nd case is 'just' a discovered mate.


1

Although not directly answering the question, here is a problem that I recently came across that demonstrates how the right the castle affects caluclating threefold repeition. [Title "Petrović, Nenad, Problem (Zagreb) 1959, 1st Prize, White To Move And Mate In 8"] [FEN "r3k2r/p2p4/p1pP2p1/5pN1/5p2/1Q3p2/PP4b1/KB6 w kq - 0 1"] 1. Qb7 {In the intial position,...


1

Your programming description relies on variable name specific to your program, so it's hard to understand what you're saying, but one way to program this is to to have a "double pawn move" boolean. To makes things simpler, let's assume that white is the one making a double pawn move. To move a pawn two space, white first moves the pawn one space, and set ...


1

The best way to think of en passant is that it's a normal move in all regards, except that the opportunity to play it expires on that move. The move can be carried out so long as it doesn't break any rules, just like any other move. So it can be used to block a check, give a check, give a checkmate, etc. But let's say your pawn is pinned to your king. If ...


1

Thanks for the question. If an officer could indeed be captured en passant, then one would need to undo any capture it had just made, which is potentially awkward. This doesn't apply to pawns, because the famous double hop is defined to be a non-capturing move.


1

This is just a bit of though experiment of mine regarding the rules of chess. Enjoy! While a pawn can only capture en passant once in today's rules, as @Seth points out in his wonderful answer, it wasn't always so cut and dry in the 19th century. Many joke compositions have been made that exploited the fact that you could apparently promote to an enemy ...


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