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12

SCID has a text file that you can use. It begins like this: # scid.eco # # Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings file for Scid vs. PC # # Copyright (C) 1999- Shane Hudson and others. # Last updated: Febuary, 2014 # # In addition to standard ECO definitions, scid.eco allows for extensions: # Each basic code can have a lower case letter extension (a-z), and an ...


7

I am not sure what you are asking. This is not a question of any eco or opening but rather of tactics which you were missing. After Nxc3+ (discovered check), you lose the queen and basically the game. There are two main themes in this game: pin: of the knight on c3 by the bishop on b4; Therefore the pawn on e4 is not protected anymore as you cannot move ...


3

These codes are the extended ECO codes by SCID, and have no meaning outside it. When classifying the games you can enable or disable the extended ECO codes to force SCID to use the standard ones, if you prefer so. There's a short explanation of the reason for the extended ECO codes here: https://sourceforge.net/p/scid/wiki/TheECObrowser/


3

My move by move analysis see below. Comments appear below the board as you play through the game. Generally a blunder rich game. White seems to like pushing pawns a bit too much, while black played too passively in the beginning. Black should have attacked the strong white center right from the start with b6. Both players neglected the development of their ...


3

There does not seem to be a consensus on this, but here is a relevant discussion: https://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-equipment/chess-opening-reference-books?page=1 For printed opening material (as you requested) I prefer ECO with Chess Informant updates for new opening ideas and analysis: http://www.chessinformant.org/about-chess-informant/


2

I have the 1981 editions of Volume C, and there is no g or q that I can find. It's possible that the creators of that file used lettering instead of numbering for the sub-variations, since q is the 17th letter of the English alphabet, and line 17 under C45 does match up with the variation listed.


1

I have created this list, but I'm not sure how well it matches your naming convention: http://cricketchess.pcriot.com/opg/ As a programmer, I can tell you it is very difficult to match an opening to PGN but much easier to match it to a FEN. In the case of the Caro-Kann, Accelerated Panov (and other openings as well), it is worthy to note that the opening ...


1

I maintain one here that you might like to take a look at to see if it is any use for your purposes: PGN for ECO descriptions with moves


1

After 4...Bb4 5. e5 makes Black look scattered. White mobilizes nicely after 5...Nh5 6.Nd5 Nc6 7.Bb5 Be7 8. 0-0 0-0 9. d4. The problem with 5. d4 is it makes good on the Bb4 pin on the Nc3. 5... Nxe4 is possible immediately, instead of ...0-0. But even so, as in the game, after 5... 0-0, 6. Bxf4 is simply not paying attention to the e-pawn, and as ...


1

The ECO system, invented by the publishers of Informator chess magazine, has 2 levels that represent valid coding, just as the United States Postal Service and the Post Office in the UK do. The first is the 3-character code structure of X99, where X is in the set {A-E} and 99 are any numeric digits. The second is the first triplet, then a "/" slash ...


1

IMO, this is an area that needs work. I developed a small computer program to check for duplicates in openings and found that most opening categorizations contain duplicate positions. For example, Schiller's opening list has duplicate openings. The same positions arise through different move orders but are named differently. ECO is far too general.


1

In the very first pages of the book you will find code system. It is described in 5 world languages and Serbian. This is important to know so you can see at the end of the line what is the final evaluation of the position, if there are any novelties or alternative moves and so on. Then you can skip the pages all the way to the line you wish to investigate....


1

First of all, I do not know if trying the feature Opening Report on a single game (or a database composed of a single game) would show the variations in the ECO tree. If you have not tried it, this would be my first step. I also don't know if the ECO table can be directly printed as on ChessBase (it certainly is a great feature), but what you can do, albeit ...


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