10

A good opening for Black seldom is a great choice for White even with a tempo up. Grandmaster Alex Yermolinsky discusses reasons for this in his book "The Road to Chess Improvement". One of the main reasons is that the opening goals are not the same for both sides in the opening, and schemes that are suitable for defense or counterattack are much less ...


6

I personally play 1. f4 quite a lot, and as with EVERY opening, White gains and loses something with his first move. The pros are that White can clamp down even tighter on the e5-square from the get-go and possibly save tempos with not having to navigate Nf3. The downsides are that this move is committal (not a terrible thing, just that White has ...


6

You raise a very interesting point - you're absolutely correct in saying that 3...f5 is not a common response to the Blackmar-Diemer gambit. However, the gambit can be reached in another way where Black doesn't have the option of playing this move: [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. e4 dxe4 4. f3 In the Dutch, Black can sidestep White by playing this move: [...


5

I am still not sure whether this answers your question, but: Scandinavian tends to lead to more open/tactical games while the Dutch tends to lead to more closed/positional games. If you want to profile openings I suggest to take a database and check game positions of master players around move 10-15 and see whether you like any of those positions. But ...


5

This isn't necessarily an answer; it's some amusing searches and information that might help others get a "real" answer. (It just seemed too much for a comment.) I'm not familiar with this setup, so I resorted to "Google-fu". A quick Google search found A10 English, Anglo-Dutch defense. Following forward with 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d4 e5 shows only a single game (...


5

Optimal piece setup in openings are determined by pawn structures. If you compare the common pawn structures of the openings KID, Gruenfeld, Queen's Gambit, Queen's Indian with the Dutch you will notice a substantial difference: The existence of the black f5-pawn and white's pawn on e2 rather than e4. The black pawn structure of Stonewall Dutch is usualy c6-...


5

The g3 and Bg2 setup is strong defensively and strong offensively. White wants to play e4 to challenge the f5 pawn and Black's kingside white square complex. g3 and Bg2 is one of the best ways to support e4 with Nd2/c3 and Qc2 along with defending the king.


5

The main reason is to exchange black's good bishop, and what would probably end up being white's bad bishop after a later e3. Another common way of doing this is Bg5xNf6. This also highlights black's dark-square weakness problem that he will have to watch out for for quite a while. This exchange on a3 leaves black's other bad bishop on c8 more markedly bad, ...


4

In the pawn structure of the Stonewall Dutch the light squared bishop is the sick piece in black's position and the dark squared bishop is the star. If white can exchange the dark squared bishops then white already stands much better because of all the resulting weak dark squares in black's position, particularly e5. Consequently it is a mistake for black ...


4

"If you look at the first move, you can see that the two openings are similar, due to the fact the initial pawn structures of both openings are actually mirror images of each other." That's one of the most patzerish things I've ever read in a book written by a strong player. Flip the board around, and I don't think anyone (not even Simon Williams) ...


4

The game 1/2‒1/2(40) Dietze, Sebastian (2129) – Lorenz, Mark (2250) / Regionalliga NW 0506 (7.1), Bayern 2006, gave me a hint on how to proceed: [FEN ""] 1. d4 f5 2. f4 Nf6 3. e3 b6 4. Nf3 Bb7 5. c3 e6 6. Bd3 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Nbd2 d5 9. b3 Ne4 After ... f5 I believe its necessary to stop that pawn with 2 f4; ... Nf6 was the best continuation ...


3

As a former Stonewall/Bird/Dutch player, I would suggest the anti-Dutch Bg5. This is annoying for black, and you solve the problem of your worst piece. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chesscollection?cid=1029579 Transposing into a Colle is not good as the king side attack is blunted by the f5 pawn. The suggested method is to break with f3/e4 and saddle ...


3

After 1...d6 you could consider playing 2.e4. One of the biggest advantages of 1.Nf3 is it's flexibility and if you are looking for a quiet(ish) game then perhaps a Be2 (Classical) Pirc is your answer. Against 1...f5 2.d3 has an excellent reputation I believe. (Idea is 2...Nf6 3.e4 and black is advised not to take the gambit pawn). Worth noting is that 1....


3

The Dutch has definitely a sound positional base, that is, with f5 you take under control the center (e4), prepare to develop your knight behind a pawn (which is usually good as the squares diagonally to the pawn are now defended twice. This is the reason you play c4 in the Queens Gambit and only after Nc3 btw) and aim for fast counterplay or a solid setup. ...


3

The World Championship Match between Botvinnik and Bronstein in 1951 contains quite a number of Dutch Defense games. I didn't find many books about the match, but there was one by Botvinnik that may provide a good reference point.


3

Even if you play the Dutch a tempo up, you don't have great chances of gaining an advantage (especially if your opponent is completely satisfied with just equalizing). As White you typically want to maximize your chances of getting some edge, and a better way to do this is by controlling more of the centre with 1.e4/1.d4, or perhaps developing a piece with 1....


2

There may be a psychological element. My impression is that 1.f4 is often played by weaker players, just to avoid the main line "book" that they fear from a strong opponent (although I dont want to impute that motive to anyone here). On the other hand, I think that 1..f5 is often played by strong opponents to prevent a weak White player from playing it safe.


2

You're all missing a rather obvious point. An f5 setup by black is strongest when white plays d4, weakening his e4 square (which f5 of course attacks). In the Dutch, black already KNOWS white has played d4, so there is already strategic logic in the reply. However in Bird's, white is committing to f4 quite speculatively and black can if he wishes avoid d5, ...


2

The fianchetto of the light squared bishop is a "double barreled pistol" against the Dutch. It is strong defensively against Black's king side attack. It is strong offensively in the center. Most games resolve themselves into a "race." Here, the issue is can White get a winning position in the center before Black's king side attack breaks through? The ...


2

The Killer Dutch by GM Simon Williams includes 24 annotated games, as well as a lot of great advice and new ideas for Dutch players. It focuses mainly on the Classical Dutch, so it sounds ideal for you. There's also an accompanying DVD that's very decent, available from Simon's own site here or as a digital download from OCL.


2

...e6 is fine with the option of transitioning to a stonewall setup and gaining a tempo against the Bc4 with d5,c6,Be7/Bd6,Qe7. The bishop on the a2-g8 diagonal is now a bit offsides. that is how I look at it. Don't fall in love with the "Leningrad" and hang on to dear life to it's precepts if transitioning into another system warrants it. That seems the ...


2

My suggestion would be to go for the g6 setup right away, and then if White plays Bc4 or Qb3 you can counter with d5 or e6. In this case you could combine the Stonewall setup with the Leningrad setup, for example. While not perfectly ideal, Nakamura himself has played it a few times (in the main line!), and it's a respectable setup in the Leningrad. The ...


2

When you look at the position, you see a horrible light Bishop for Black, and you see a dark Bishop for White that doesn't have a whole lot to do, effectively. It's biting on the d-pawn, its 'natural prey' (the Black Knight on f6) cannot be effectively pinned, as the queen will be wanting to slide to e8 in this position anyway, so what's it going to do? The ...


2

It helps to think about it at a very basic strategic level: With white you're supposed to play for the initiative and not induce a weakness on move 1... 1.d4 for example is a safe first step towards claiming the centre, while creating active squares for the queen, b1 knight and activating the c1 bishop, all while stopping black from any immediate e5 attempt (...


2

In most Dutch games, Black labors mightly to get 1...e5 in (and prevent White from playing e4). If you're a Dutch player and someone plays 1. c4 on you, and you don't play 1...e5, you might have missed the point. (A good reminder that understanding the principles and ideas behind an opening is more important than memorizing the moves.) Here's a good primer ...


2

Lets forget the game is a Dutch as you leave opening theory extremely quickly with amateur moves. I recommend you learn basic principals which are available for free in many places such as this Susan Polgar video: https://youtu.be/U9cIr7P9gkg


2

The most similar variations probably come in some of the closed lines (Grand Prix, Closed Sicilian...) where each side plays in an opposite side of the board. The Morra Gambit is also "similar" to 1.d4 f5 2.e4 in the sense that White sacrifices a pawn for activity, but that's pretty much it. The fact that in the Sicilian White can freely play d2-d4 ...


2

The pin of the e6 pawn doesn't seem important at all in this position. In fact, it is hard to see what White is trying to accomplish with Bc4. By "going into Stonewall" I guess you mean .. d5, and that is certainly tempting, seeing as White will have to lose a tempo just to put his Bishop on another not-great square. For an alternative, consider .. Nc6, ...


2

From my experience in playing the dutch(leningrad and stonewall) and the bird(typically reverse leningrad dutch), I feel its very tough to get an edge but lets people get a levelled game. You also don't really surprise people. Half my games goes something like this f4 d5 Nf3 c5 g3 g6 Bg2 Bg7 O-O Nf6 d3 O-O, and from here white has several options but even in ...


1

Honestly, I'd put to use the study you've already done, and play the other side of the Stonewall with a move in hand. Have a look through your preparation to play the Stonewall Attack, and see what ideas from Black seem to be the soundest, seem to give you the move trouble, and play for those sorts of positions with the White pieces. If Your opponent ...


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